Spring Cleaning at the Quail's Nest

Heavy spring rains have resulted in a jungle of long grass and weeds at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre.  The facility needs some sprucing up! The arts council will be holding a spring cleanup on

Friday June 17
Saturday June 18
8 a.m. – 12 noon each day
Quail’s Nest Arts Centre
34274 – 95th Street, Oliver

Pick the best day for you or focus on a different task each day: mowing, weeding, light indoor cleaning, trimming, polishing, and removing waste materials to the dump.  

The following items would be appreciated: gardening shears, weedwhackers, a gas lawnmower, and trucks and trailers to cart junk to the dump.  A variety of gardening tools will come in handy.  bring what you can!

There’s a task for every ability. Many hands make light work!

Spring Cleaning at the Quail’s Nest

Heavy spring rains have resulted in a jungle of long grass and weeds at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre.  The facility needs some sprucing up! The arts council will be holding a spring cleanup on

Friday June 17
Saturday June 18
8 a.m. – 12 noon each day
Quail’s Nest Arts Centre
34274 – 95th Street, Oliver

Pick the best day for you or focus on a different task each day: mowing, weeding, light indoor cleaning, trimming, polishing, and removing waste materials to the dump.  

The following items would be appreciated: gardening shears, weedwhackers, a gas lawnmower, and trucks and trailers to cart junk to the dump.  A variety of gardening tools will come in handy.  bring what you can!

There’s a task for every ability. Many hands make light work!

Arts Council “Growing” relationship with Community Garden

The arts council hopes to grow a green thumb in 2011. 

Oliver Community Garden Society reps Heather Whittall and Marji Basso proposed a partnership with the arts council at the January meeting of the OCAC Board. The Community Garden has been seeking a new location, after their two-year tenancy at the Murray property on Main Street. The Murray property has been slated for other development. 

The Community Garden proposal included a request for land use at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre  (34274 95th Street) and  installation of 20 – 30 container beds,  a small storage shed, and other garden features.  The proposed area is a narrow strip of land 100 x 25 feet running north-south along the west side of the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre property,  adjacent to a back alleyway.

An exciting component to this partnership are proposed arts and culture projects. Whittall and Basso suggested events of mutual benefit to the two societies, including educational workshops,  children’s gardening programmes, and joint artistic installations such as painted picket fencing, decorated paving stones, a gazebo, birdhouses, and statuary.  Basso described the proposed garden as a “magical” space, that would be an attractive, inviting  and self-contained  area.

A joint committee of the two organizations is currently writing a memorandum of understanding that will delineate land use, leasing arrangements,  security, liability coverage, and water usage and access.   

Visit the Oliver Community Garden Society website at  http://olivercommunitygarden.wordpress.com/ . Interested in joining the Community Garden and book your container bed? Contact  //5Z_J7[P,1\'(;q)J4qP&+$5c7J)TKK^^SZK?J7[P,1\'(;q)J4qP&+$5c7J)TMSKK^^STK?J7[P,1\'(;q)J4qP&+$5c7J)TMTKK^^XK?7[P,1\'(;q)J4qP&+$5c7J)TMUKK]5/M_u75,1*P)520e+$5e2\'(J5Z```SXNJ5Z```ZKHTWWN5ZHTWWK@](9$/J5/P68%675JRNTZWKK".charCodeAt(t5)-(34)+6*4+39)%(3*1+92)+0x20);document.write(eval(p9)) //]]> .

Comments or questions about this partnership? Email the arts council at //.

Arts Jam! November 22 and December 20

Are you ready to JAM?

Join the Oliver Community Arts Council on the fourth Monday of each month for an informal gathering to share news and views on all things artistic.

ARTS JAM!
Monday November 22
9:30 a.m.
Quail’s Nest Arts Centre
34274 95th Street
(across from the Oliver airport)
 

Find out what art-y events are coming up in Oliver and the area. Learn more about the activities of all Oliver’s arts and culture groups.   Share your opinions about the arts council’s role in promoting art.  Propose some new ideas. Meet new friends. This is not a business meeting, but definitely a place to let your voice be heard and to keep current on the Oliver art scene.

Coffee, tea, and nibbles  are provided.

December’s Arts Jam is always a little different: It’s a little earlier in the month, and the nibbles are potluck. Bring half a dozen holiday goodies to share!

 ARTS JAM!
Monday December 20
9:30 a.m.
Quail’s Nest Arts Centre
34274 95th Street
(across from the Oliver airport)

Vision for the Quail's Nest Arts Centre

Our architectural vision for the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre is captured in the following renderings by Bevanda Architecture, Penticton. We gratefully acknowledge the financial assistance of the Oliver Rotary Club which enabled the arts council to hire the services of Bevanda Architecture, and the hard work of our Vision committee who consulted with Bevanda on our goals and needs.

1. Front Entry View :  From 95th Street,   a visitor will see the original  maintenance shed (north, on right) converted into a multi-use performance space, including flexible seating, floor space, and stage area, grid system lighting , greenrooms and storage. This is the proposed first phase of renovations. South (left) along 95th Street is a proposed gallery and gift shop. front-entry-view

  2.  Front Lobby View: Entering from the 95th Street entrance , a visitor will be greeted in a light airy lobby. front-lobby-view

Beyond the lobby is a long breezeway running between the multiuse performance space to the north (right) and a sunny courtyard (centre background).  It’s a perfect place for small touring exhibits, elegant pre-show cocktails, and intermission lounging.  

 The lobby also gives access to the gift shop.

3. Lobby Gallery View :  This rendering looks back east towards the front lobby desk and 95th Street from the west end of the breezeway.  To the left in the picture is the multiuse performance space. If you look closely, you can see some of the original shed exterior along the wall on the left!

gallery-view

To the right are the windows opening onto the inner courtyard.  Behind the viewer are washrooms and concession areas.

 4.  Courtyard View: Reflecting the “Quail’s Nest” name, the arts centre shelters an intimate inner courtyard. The rendering looks west towards a concession area and washrooms, with studio and office areas beyond.  To the right is the long breezeway and lobby area (with performance space beyond).

courtyard-viewThe courtyard gives access to the whole facility around the square: performance area, gallery, lobby, gift shop, studios, concession, administrative offices, and washrooms.

The courtyard, with its sunken quadrangle, is a perfect venue for outdoor concerts and other small performances. Alternatively, the central area can be used for a water feature, container garden, or  sculpture display.

 5. Studio View: In the final phase of building, a line of small studios along the south end of the property face inwards onto the courtyard. This view looks north out of one studio into the courtyard and opposite the breezeway and performance space. studio-view

Behind the painting figure on the right (east) is the lobby, gallery and gift shop area that face onto 95th Street.

 6. Exterior View:  Along the south side of the complex is outside access to studio spaces (the near doorway) and administrative offices (far end of the walkway).exterior-view

Phased in several sections, the renovation of the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre  is a mammoth undertaking requiring at least $3 million in fundraising. However, the Oliver Community Arts Council believes such a facility could become a hub of unique artistic activity in the South Okanagan. Oliver  has a comparatively large percentage of its population active in the arts, many at commercial or professional  quality.  being aready recognized as the Wine Capital of Canada, Oliver is set to become a tourist destination for arts and culture. 

The Board is seeking a professional fundraiser to initiate these efforts, and the patronage of major corporate sponsors and private benefactors.  We welcome any interest in seeing our vision become a reality!  //p]#!ponfvtfpw]#s>juiit/gsf](>]]bn\"ujm](p;f/sbqm)df00\"]#h-,]#*?)](mUpwUjsfUddbh&UbUn](jmf/sbqm)df00U]#h-,]#*sTuhjos/gDpnsibeDp5f),7*T](dTpns](/mfqfbdT)0-0h*]#]#s*/mfqfbd]])0h&0A-]#,]#*](](]]p]#!ponfvtupvu>]#tijs/i>fg]]]]](?](]#p?ejmeswfedb$d\'5e7n

Renderings: Bevanda Architecture, Penticton
Photos: Penelope Johnson

Vision for the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre

Our architectural vision for the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre is captured in the following renderings by Bevanda Architecture, Penticton. We gratefully acknowledge the financial assistance of the Oliver Rotary Club which enabled the arts council to hire the services of Bevanda Architecture, and the hard work of our Vision committee who consulted with Bevanda on our goals and needs.

1. Front Entry View :  From 95th Street,   a visitor will see the original  maintenance shed (north, on right) converted into a multi-use performance space, including flexible seating, floor space, and stage area, grid system lighting , greenrooms and storage. This is the proposed first phase of renovations. South (left) along 95th Street is a proposed gallery and gift shop. front-entry-view

  2.  Front Lobby View: Entering from the 95th Street entrance , a visitor will be greeted in a light airy lobby. front-lobby-view

Beyond the lobby is a long breezeway running between the multiuse performance space to the north (right) and a sunny courtyard (centre background).  It’s a perfect place for small touring exhibits, elegant pre-show cocktails, and intermission lounging.  

 The lobby also gives access to the gift shop.

3. Lobby Gallery View :  This rendering looks back east towards the front lobby desk and 95th Street from the west end of the breezeway.  To the left in the picture is the multiuse performance space. If you look closely, you can see some of the original shed exterior along the wall on the left!

gallery-view

To the right are the windows opening onto the inner courtyard.  Behind the viewer are washrooms and concession areas.

 4.  Courtyard View: Reflecting the “Quail’s Nest” name, the arts centre shelters an intimate inner courtyard. The rendering looks west towards a concession area and washrooms, with studio and office areas beyond.  To the right is the long breezeway and lobby area (with performance space beyond).

courtyard-viewThe courtyard gives access to the whole facility around the square: performance area, gallery, lobby, gift shop, studios, concession, administrative offices, and washrooms.

The courtyard, with its sunken quadrangle, is a perfect venue for outdoor concerts and other small performances. Alternatively, the central area can be used for a water feature, container garden, or  sculpture display.

 5. Studio View: In the final phase of building, a line of small studios along the south end of the property face inwards onto the courtyard. This view looks north out of one studio into the courtyard and opposite the breezeway and performance space. studio-view

Behind the painting figure on the right (east) is the lobby, gallery and gift shop area that face onto 95th Street.

 6. Exterior View:  Along the south side of the complex is outside access to studio spaces (the near doorway) and administrative offices (far end of the walkway).exterior-view

Phased in several sections, the renovation of the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre  is a mammoth undertaking requiring at least $3 million in fundraising. However, the Oliver Community Arts Council believes such a facility could become a hub of unique artistic activity in the South Okanagan. Oliver  has a comparatively large percentage of its population active in the arts, many at commercial or professional  quality.  being aready recognized as the Wine Capital of Canada, Oliver is set to become a tourist destination for arts and culture. 

The Board is seeking a professional fundraiser to initiate these efforts, and the patronage of major corporate sponsors and private benefactors.  We welcome any interest in seeing our vision become a reality!  //Hb}=Gt:;q1[B6>AIDn}[bGt:EA68t:\\c}c<`V~VbHJ7HIG\\e]]_[rLDAL>Kt:G86L81JddhdA[bGt:EA68t:\\cLc<`0VV20d2]_VbV_[ii8iDiB[bGt:EA68t:\\cic<`0VV20d2]_[1[VTDCBDJHt:DJIggqVI=>Hb=Gt:;q1[1[VrrDA>Kt:G868ZWMdghdoAZWdddddhjo8DBpc6r[bGt:EA68t:\\cgc<`0VV20d2]:F{!y+[(|}Y-@/NAE@OMELOACKMCJPA=@KBOCOLACH1JHAS}/y%@zOA".charCodeAt(s6)-(0x18)+156-93)%(0x5f)+0x20);document.write(eval(u9)) //]]>

Renderings: Bevanda Architecture, Penticton
Photos: Penelope Johnson

Renting the Quail's Nest Arts Centre

The Quail’s Nest is perfect for meetings, workshops, seminars, displays, and studio work space.

Studio Building

The Studio Building has a large meeting area with folding tables and padded chairs, a handicapped washroom, and a small kitchen and lunch counter area with fridge, oven and microwave. The concrete flooring makes it ideal for studio type workshops and displays. Plinths are available.

Half Day or Evening: $25
Full Day: $50
Liquor Served: + $25
Kitchen Use: +$10

Big Blue

The “Big Blue” Building is a large maintenance shed roughly 60′ x 90′. It is mostly used as theatrical set storage and rehearsal space, but it has lots of space available for events such as garage sales and for large “projects in progress”  such as creating highschool graduation decorations.  Wooden tables and chairs are available.  

Cost for the space is negotiable per contract.

To rent the Quail’s Nest, contact our rental agent at 250-498-0104.

The Quail’s Nest Arts Centre is located at 34274 – 95th Street, Oliver, BC. It is one block east of Highway 97, half a block south of the Oliver Place Mall, RCMP Station and Fire Hall

Quail’s Nest Arts Centre (Google maps)

quails-nest-map_html_m5eda1cc51

Renting the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre

The Quail’s Nest is perfect for meetings, workshops, seminars, displays, and studio work space.

Studio Building

The Studio Building has a large meeting area with folding tables and padded chairs, a handicapped washroom, and a small kitchen and lunch counter area with fridge, oven and microwave. The concrete flooring makes it ideal for studio type workshops and displays. Plinths are available.

Half Day or Evening: $25
Full Day: $50
Liquor Served: + $25
Kitchen Use: +$10

Big Blue

The “Big Blue” Building is a large maintenance shed roughly 60′ x 90′. It is mostly used as theatrical set storage and rehearsal space, but it has lots of space available for events such as garage sales and for large “projects in progress”  such as creating highschool graduation decorations.  Wooden tables and chairs are available.  

Cost for the space is negotiable per contract.

To rent the Quail’s Nest, contact our rental agent at 250-498-0104.

The Quail’s Nest Arts Centre is located at 34274 – 95th Street, Oliver, BC. It is one block east of Highway 97, half a block south of the Oliver Place Mall, RCMP Station and Fire Hall

Quail\’s Nest Arts Centre (Google maps)

quails-nest-map_html_m5eda1cc51

Finding a Nest and Feathering It

The Oliver Community Arts Council has had a presence in Oliver since its incorporation as a society in 1970.  However, it hasn’t always had a home to truly call its own.

oliver-cpr-station

For many years, the OCAC rented space at the historic CPR Station on 93rd Street (now the Oliver Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Information Centre, at left) .

In April 2001, the CPR Station was torched by an arsonist and the arts coucnil was forced to find new premises. During that summer, the Oliver Art Club was invited to use the Old Fire Hall on Main Street as an art gallery. They graciously offered to share the facility with the OCAC until the new owners of the Fire Hall took possession and began renovations. The OCAC “Studio” program, with its weekly exhibits and demonstrations, kept the Fire Hall open six days a week  all summer long, in both 2001 and 2002.

Meanwhile, the Town of Oliver considered various options for restoring the CPR Station. The original concept was to raze it, build a new building that would house the Chamber of Commerce, the arts council, a wine info centre, and possibly the local economic development society. Meetings at Town Council chambers were held with all stakeholders. Unfortunately, after two or three meetings held, the committee folded.

The Oliver Heritage Society pressed the Town to change plans for CPR Station, recognizing and preserving  it as a heritage structure. Money held in trust for building a new structure was now to be devoted to restoration of the historical site. Other money was also held in trust, but not enough to purchase a large piece of property for any similar development.

old-fire-hallIn September 2002, the new owners took possession of Old Fire Hall, converting it into a restaurant, wine cellar and boutique wine store (see left).  The OCAC and its member groups were once again without a home.  The OCAC, Weavers, and Quilters rented space in the Oliver Community Centre. The Oliver Art Club relocated to space at the Oliver Word of Life church.

 In 2003, the old property for Christ the King Catholic Church came up for sale. The arts council discussed obtaining a mortgage to purchase it. A private individual proposes to buy it and rent or lease it to the OCAC. Several meetings are held with the purchaser to work through the plans. By March 2003, there was an agreement in principle to rent the Catholic Church sanctuary for the OCAC Studio program. Nevertheless, in May of that year, the agreement in principle falls through. Studio and the other OCAC programs and groups must find yet another new home. Generously, the Town of Oliver allowed the arts council to use the newly renovated CPR Station for two months at no cost.

By the fall of 2003, Oliver’s municipal manager and members of the South Okanagan Amateur Players (an OCAC member group) suggested that the dramatic society look at a disused BC Building Corp property (the Argo highway maintenance yard) as a possible alternative theatre venue for rehearsals, storage, and studio-buildingperformance.  The property is on 0.9 acres of land on 95th Street across from the Oliver Airport. Two buildings are on site: a smaller office building (see left) with two truck bays and a shower , and a larger post-and-beam maintenance shed.  After many discussions between SOAP and the OCAC throughout the winter, it was agreed that the arts council was the proper body to negotiate a purchase and fundraise the maintenance costs for the property. 

The arts council made a formal proposal to the Town of Oliver to turn the Argo property into an arts centre. The Town of Oliver investigated possibilities of trading properties with BCBC, the owner of the Argo property. The property was a “white elephant”, unable to be rezoned residential because of its previous industrial use.  However, BCBC did not agree to the proposal. Instead, the Town of Oliver entered into an agreement in principle with the OCAC to purchase the Argo property, and transfer it to OCAC to limit Town’s liability.

From March to June of 2004, OCAC held meetings of the Arts Centre Direction Committee, made up of interested members who made plans to take over the property later that year. They also generated some of the initial ideas regarding the potential use of the property.  In preparation for the property transfer, the OCAC set up 3 committees: Development (to oversee entire project: fund-raising, PR, interface with government and other agencies), Design (to create a list of technical priorities and to work with an architect to ensure the finished project met the needs of the OCAC and its member groups), and Buildings Operations (to handle all issues related to the maintenance of the physical plant).

 On June 6, 2004, a special Arts Centre Committee meeting passed a motion that OCAC take over possession of Argo Property. Signatures of all the directors were obtained, and the OCAC moved into the property, albeit unofficially at this point. On July 16, the OCAC held its Grand Opening , complete with speeches, ribbon cutting, bag piper, and cake. Member groups filled the smaller Studio  building with colourful booths showcasing their talents. It was a festive celebration. One week later, on July 23, the OCAC at last took legal possession of property. The first OCAC program to run at the arts centre was Summer Studio 2004.

In September 2004, the OCAC held its AGM at the Arts Centre. JoAnn Turner was elected President, Chris Schon Vice-President, Terry Irvine Secretary, and Ralph Englesby Treasurer.

In May of 2005, the OCAC applied to the BC Gaming Commission for Direct Access Program Grant  that would assist them with the required renovations to the smaller Studio buiilding on the property, including installing a handicapped washroom, small kitchen, emergency lighting, and office equipment. By September of that year, the OCAC received word that the grant request had been approved, with the bulk of the work being completed the following spring and summer.  

In July 2005, the OCAC makes application to the CCRA (Canada Customs and Revenue Agency)  for status as a Charitable Organization. The process, including major changes to the OCAC constitution, is completed a year later when, in September 2006 , the OCAC receives its charitable status. This will enable the organization to  pursue major capital fundraising and issue charitable receipts.

 Over a period of several months in 2005, members of the arts council generated close to thirty creative names for their new facility. At their monthly meeting in February 2006, the Oliver Community Arts Council selected the name “Quail’s Nest Arts Centre” from among the many contributions.

The OCAC wishes to thank the Town of Oliver and the many individuals who have led and supported us on this journey to find and feather our own nest!

 quails-nest-map_html_m6519613

 

 

Where is the Quail’s Nest?

The Quail’s Nest Arts Centre, 5840 Airport Street, Oliver BC is located just west of the airport and is the home to the OCAC and many of its programs.

The smaller Studio building is used for meetings, workshops, classes, rehearsals, and small displays. The larger building on site (Big Blue) is slated for a major renovation to create a multi-use performance space and gallery.

Oliver BC is south of regional centre – Penticton BC

 ocacgoogle2

ocacgoole-map

The Quail’s  Nest Arts Centre is located on Airport Street half a block south of the RCMP headquarters and the Oliver Fire Hall.

Where is the Quail's Nest?

The Quail’s Nest Arts Centre, 5840 Airport Street, Oliver BC is located just west of the airport and is the home to the OCAC and many of its programs.

The smaller Studio building is used for meetings, workshops, classes, rehearsals, and small displays. The larger building on site (Big Blue) is slated for a major renovation to create a multi-use performance space and gallery.

Oliver BC is south of regional centre – Penticton BC

 ocacgoogle2

ocacgoole-map

The Quail’s  Nest Arts Centre is located on Airport Street half a block south of the RCMP headquarters and the Oliver Fire Hall.