Fall Art Show and Sale: A Winning Weekend

The 2010 Fall Art Show and Sale  wrapped up Sunday October 3 with visitors remarking that it was one of the best shows ever. Many comments referred to the successfully represented theme: “Those Were the Days”. Not only did the competitive entries reminisce about days gone by, but the other exhibits and events reflected the same nostalgic theme. The Oliver and District Heritage Society mounted an attractive and interesting display of 1920s and 30s pop culture (toys, games, and film stills) and early Oliver life (home appliances, machinery and housewares).  Guest artist Marianne Parsons demonstrated quilting techniques, surely a homesteading skill from Oliver’s early days. Two fund raising paintings also waxed nostalgic about summers in the South Okanagan.

A two-day silent auction of antiques and collectables from the early to mid 20th century drew many bids. Pictured at right, a bakelite vanity set from the 1930s commanded some competitive bidding. The Jazz Out West trio entertained at the Saturday reception with classic standards by Gershwin, Berlin, Cole Porter and more. 

Almost 400 visitors signed the guestbook over two days, with an estimate of a few hundred more who didn’t stand in line to sign! Many of the art enthusiasts crowded around artwork that ended up winning or placing in their category.

Sue McCarrell’s two New Media entries, including best-in-show “Moment in Time”, attracted many questions about her transfer techniques. McCarrell combed the Oliver archives looking for old sepia photographs, letters and newspapers to create transfer images which, by means of a gel process, were then adhered to wood panelling.

A hushed audience gathered around Merle Somerville’s depiction of a snowy orchard in his giclee-on-canvas entry called “Days Gone By”. His photograph aquired a painterly quality by being reproduced on artists canvas with ink jet printing techniques (“giclee”) rather than on photo paper. It was easy to be drawn into the photograph by its skillful use of perspective and light. 

The brash brushstrokes of Michael Randle’s primitive style abstracts  reflected both his sense of humour and his love of bold colour. Wayne Borthwick’s “Home on the Range” got the most attention from children and the young at heart. The enormous model of a farmhouse, complete with walls that opened outward revealing furnished rooms within, was tempting to touch. Shirley Nilsson’s quilted hanging “School Days” glowed with fall colour; three-dimensional fabric leaves  decorated the border. Emerging artist Megan Pedersen’s piece, “Ghost of a Memory” was a touching reminiscence about one of the most painful of memories, a lost love.

The Oliver Community Arts Council thanks all the entrants to the Fall Art Show and Sale. Together you have created an experience several hundred people will never forget! Here is the complete list of winners. Congratulations everyone!

List of 2010 Fall Art Show Winners

Best Interpretation of Theme
Sue McCarrell: “Moment in Time”
  
Painting (Representational)
First: Eleanore Dempster ~ “The Way We Were”
Second: Kerry Chung ~ “Past and Future”
Third: Sandy Boblin ~ “The Coach”
 
Painting (Abstract)
First (tie): Tara Hovanes ~ “Untitled”
First (tie): Michael Randle ~ Number 1 Project
Third: Dona Smithson ~ “Last Tree Standing”
 
Photography
First: Merle Sommerville ~ “Days Gone By”
Second: Val Friesen ~ “Oh yes, those were the days…”
Third: Russell Work ~ “Oliver”
 
Fibre Art:
First: Shirley Nilsson ~ “School Days”
Second (tie): A. Carole Grant ~ Relics
Second (tie): Terry Irvine ~ The Past Revisited
 
Three Dimensional
First: Wayne Borthwick ~ “Home on the Range 1945”
Second: Donna McLean ~ Beauty from the Forest
Third: Donna McLean ~ A Look from the Past (3 pieces)
 
New Media
First: Sue McCarrell ~ “Moment in Time”
Second: Marion Trimble ~ “Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow”
Third: Sue McCarrell ~ “Vintage Pleasure”
 
Emerging Artist (Under 19)
Certificate of Merit: Megan Pedersen ~ “Ghost of a Memory”

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Fall Art Show and Sale: Those Were the Days

The 2010 Fall Art Show and Sale  waxes nostalgic this year, with a competition, exhibit, and sale that reminisces: “Aaaah, those were the days!”  Paired with Oliver’s Festival of the Grape for several years now and held at the same venue, the Oliver Community Arts Council event always draws a huge crowd of locals and tourists.

The Fall Art Show and Sale is held on Saturday October 2 and Sunday October 3 at the Oliver Community Centre Hall.  The Saturday event opens at 3 p.m. with an exhibit, sale, and public voting on the competitive entries.  Free admission on Saturday from 3 – 9 p.m. 

This year, 71 works of art will compete across seven categories: Painting – Representational, Painting – Abstract, Photography, Fibre Arts, Three – Dimensional, New Media, and Emerging Artists (under 19) .  The winners are selected by public ballot. An overall best-in-show category requires the winning entry to reflect “Best Interpretation of the Theme”.  The theme, “Those Were the Days”,  is broad enough to allow artists a wide interpretation: last summer’s vacation to the last century’s pioneer culture.

In addition to the competitive entries, two non-competitive displays will also be on show. The Oliver and District Heritage Society exhibits a slice of Oliver’s history with their display of Oliver’s Museum and Archives  treasures from the 1930’s. The popular RipOff Artists will present their latest multimedia interpretation of a famous artwork: Lawren Harris’ Mount Lefroy. The Group of Seven painting is recreated in wood,  quilting, weaving, oils, watercolours, encaustic (wax), photography, and three-dimensional installations.

Mirroring the nostalgic theme, the Oliver Community Arts Council will run a silent auction of small antiques and collectables from the early to mid 20th century.  Among the charming items for bid are a bakelite vanity set from the 1920s, Royal Winton chintzware, and several porcelain and silver items.  The collectables silent auction will run across both Saturday and Sunday. An additional wine auction will run on the Saturday only.

Visit the information table both days for promotional items, OCAC memberships, publicity about upcoming arts events, and information about OCAC member groups and businesses. Learn about the work of the Oliver Community Arts Council by viewing their powerpoint presentation. Make an offer on two lovely  works of art donated to the council for fund raising purposes. 

On Saturday evening, a public reception begins at  7 p.m. with live entertainment, appetizers, and wine. At 8 p.m. voting on entries closes and the ballots are counted. Right before 9 p.m., winners in all categories will be announced. Silent auction winners can claim their wine prizes.  

 On Sunday, the Fall Art Show and Sale continues by admission through your Festival of the Grape  ticket. The exhibit is open from 12:00 noon to 5:30 p.m. Although the competitive portion is over, the show and sale continues. View the winners across all categories. Wander through the Heritage Society and RipOff Artists’ exhibits. Meet the artists. Make a silent auction bid on “Those Were the Days” collectables before 5:00 p.m!  Become a member of the Oliver Community Arts Council. Buy some OCAC promotional items. Wax nostalgic, fall in love with art, and purchase artwork at the sale. Bring your chequebook and plastic!  Take a piece of Oliver home with you!

Poster artwork by Evie New
Poster layout by Heather Fink

Oliver is Bloomin’

submitted by Betty Lou Trimmer Bahnsen
Communities in Bloom Co-Chair

At the BC Communities in Bloom Conference held in Hope BC on September 24 – 26, Oliver was awarded “Four out of Five Blooms”, recognizing a year of intensive landscaping and cleanup across the district. This is an astounding feat, as this is only Oliver’s first of two years in the provincial Communities in Bloom programme. This date also marks the anniversary of the idea to have Oliver participate in Communities in Bloom. What a way to commemorate a years work with four lovely Blooms!

The Oliver Community Arts Council is basking in the reflected glow. The arts council was asked by the Communities in Bloom (CIB) committee to provide some motivation  and excitement among Oliver residents by organizing a competition to boost interest in the CIB programme.  In the spring of 2010, the OCAC’s “Best Bloomin’ Garden Contest” was off and running. A small group of arts council members solicited sponsors, organized several categories for the competition, determined criteria for each award category, arranged for judging by the Oliver Heirloom Garden Club, and designed and presented the awards. Thanks to Best Bloomin’ Garden Contest chair Penny Ruddy, and committee Stephanie Salsnek, Brian and Jennifer Mapplebeck, and Dot Cranston for their hard work!  Thanks to John Salsnek and Linda Blaschuk for designing the charming trophy. Although we were only a part of the overall cleanup efforts across the municipality and regional district, the OCAC-sponsored contest got competitive juices flowing, and gave incentive to residents and businesses to get involved.

Initially, the Oliver Communities in Bloom committee had planned to be in the non-competitive category in the first year thus, using the opportunity of the judges’ visit and evaluation to learn and to build on their adjudication for the following year, at which time Oliver would enter into the competitive category. However, at the final meeting with the judges during their July 2010 visit to Oliver, it was the judges’ suggestion that we upgrade to the competitive category. They indicated that the community had done very well and would gain more public recognition with an award, in addition to reaping the benefits of an evaluation. The Oliver Communities in Bloom committee followed the judges’ advice  — with full awareness that most communities take several years to attain the full Five Blooms. It therefore came as a complete surprise that Oliver was acclaimed with Four Blooms after only one year.

The achievement of the “Four Bloom” status and the community pride associated with this award could not have taken place without the total involvement of the Oliver community. We are thank ful for the support of individual participants , our many partners and sponsors, the local politicians (Town and Area C), the business community who gave so generously in kind, the Osoyoos Indian Band, the Bahvsagar Sikh Temple Council, the many service and cultural groups, the media, the untiring efforts of the special employees of the Town of Oliver administrative staff and Public Works, together with the happy band of Oliver Communities in Bloom volunteers which brought about this great result.

OLIVER, WE ARE A BLOOMIN’ GOOD COMMUNITY!

Photo Credit: Patrick Reid

****************

Want more information about the Communities in Bloom program? Here are some excerpts from the provincial CIB website (http://www.bccommunitiesinbloom.ca/)

All participating communities in either the national or provincial contests receive a rating of one to five ‘blooms’. All participants are promoted within BC and nationally, and are invited to attend the provincial Awards Ceremony which takes place in the fall, hosted by a different community each year. A top five bloom rating may result in an invitation to participate in the following year’s national program.

In addition to their rating, each BC CiB participant receives a comprehensive report, prepared by the judges (all qualified and experienced horticulturalists and specialists). This report reviews the particular features and projects in each of the eight criteria areas that the community has undertaken and presented. These criteria include tidiness, environmental awareness, community involvement, natural and cultural heritage conservation, tree/urban forest management, landscaped areas, floral displays, turf and groundcover. The judges offer constructive hints and recommendations for the following year.

Of course, all participants are winners with respect to increased civic pride, preservation of natural and architectural heritage, economic development, ehanced property values, decreased vandalism, improved environmental awareness, business development, increased tourism appeal, corporate relocations, new development, investment and general economic activity based on being more attractive, liveable communities!

Oliver is Bloomin'

submitted by Betty Lou Trimmer Bahnsen
Communities in Bloom Co-Chair

At the BC Communities in Bloom Conference held in Hope BC on September 24 – 26, Oliver was awarded “Four out of Five Blooms”, recognizing a year of intensive landscaping and cleanup across the district. This is an astounding feat, as this is only Oliver’s first of two years in the provincial Communities in Bloom programme. This date also marks the anniversary of the idea to have Oliver participate in Communities in Bloom. What a way to commemorate a years work with four lovely Blooms!

The Oliver Community Arts Council is basking in the reflected glow. The arts council was asked by the Communities in Bloom (CIB) committee to provide some motivation  and excitement among Oliver residents by organizing a competition to boost interest in the CIB programme.  In the spring of 2010, the OCAC’s “Best Bloomin’ Garden Contest” was off and running. A small group of arts council members solicited sponsors, organized several categories for the competition, determined criteria for each award category, arranged for judging by the Oliver Heirloom Garden Club, and designed and presented the awards. Thanks to Best Bloomin’ Garden Contest chair Penny Ruddy, and committee Stephanie Salsnek, Brian and Jennifer Mapplebeck, and Dot Cranston for their hard work!  Thanks to John Salsnek and Linda Blaschuk for designing the charming trophy. Although we were only a part of the overall cleanup efforts across the municipality and regional district, the OCAC-sponsored contest got competitive juices flowing, and gave incentive to residents and businesses to get involved.

Initially, the Oliver Communities in Bloom committee had planned to be in the non-competitive category in the first year thus, using the opportunity of the judges’ visit and evaluation to learn and to build on their adjudication for the following year, at which time Oliver would enter into the competitive category. However, at the final meeting with the judges during their July 2010 visit to Oliver, it was the judges’ suggestion that we upgrade to the competitive category. They indicated that the community had done very well and would gain more public recognition with an award, in addition to reaping the benefits of an evaluation. The Oliver Communities in Bloom committee followed the judges’ advice  — with full awareness that most communities take several years to attain the full Five Blooms. It therefore came as a complete surprise that Oliver was acclaimed with Four Blooms after only one year.

The achievement of the “Four Bloom” status and the community pride associated with this award could not have taken place without the total involvement of the Oliver community. We are thank ful for the support of individual participants , our many partners and sponsors, the local politicians (Town and Area C), the business community who gave so generously in kind, the Osoyoos Indian Band, the Bahvsagar Sikh Temple Council, the many service and cultural groups, the media, the untiring efforts of the special employees of the Town of Oliver administrative staff and Public Works, together with the happy band of Oliver Communities in Bloom volunteers which brought about this great result.

OLIVER, WE ARE A BLOOMIN’ GOOD COMMUNITY!

Photo Credit: Patrick Reid

****************

Want more information about the Communities in Bloom program? Here are some excerpts from the provincial CIB website (http://www.bccommunitiesinbloom.ca/)

All participating communities in either the national or provincial contests receive a rating of one to five ‘blooms’. All participants are promoted within BC and nationally, and are invited to attend the provincial Awards Ceremony which takes place in the fall, hosted by a different community each year. A top five bloom rating may result in an invitation to participate in the following year’s national program.

In addition to their rating, each BC CiB participant receives a comprehensive report, prepared by the judges (all qualified and experienced horticulturalists and specialists). This report reviews the particular features and projects in each of the eight criteria areas that the community has undertaken and presented. These criteria include tidiness, environmental awareness, community involvement, natural and cultural heritage conservation, tree/urban forest management, landscaped areas, floral displays, turf and groundcover. The judges offer constructive hints and recommendations for the following year.

Of course, all participants are winners with respect to increased civic pride, preservation of natural and architectural heritage, economic development, ehanced property values, decreased vandalism, improved environmental awareness, business development, increased tourism appeal, corporate relocations, new development, investment and general economic activity based on being more attractive, liveable communities!