Pick up some freebies!

Coming to the Quail Garage Sale on Saturday? Have a look at some  items we’re giving away: softwood lumber, wood pallets, rain barrels, shelving, and other bits and pieces that might appeal to a handy gal or guy. Perfect for outdoor projects and shelving.  Lumber comes in various sizes and lengths (2x12x20, 2×10, 2×8, etc)

Help us reduce, reuse and recycle!

Drop by on Saturday June 16 from 9 – 2  for pickup.  Can’t wait that long? Arts council volunteers will be on site Friday June 15 from 9 – 5 setting up for the sale. Talk to one of us then. Other arrangements can be made by emailing  OliverCAC @ gmail.com  or call 250-485-2535.

RipOff Artists go-go-go Gothic

The RipOff Artists fifth anniversary Challenge concluded this week with a race to the finish, a ringing bell, and a burst of applause and cheers. The multimedia collective has been hard at work since Monday July 4 creating several works of art inspired by American Gothic by Grant Wood. As an added challenge, each artist in the collective chose their own iconic artist to imitate when “ripping off” the original piece. At 3:00 p.m. on Saturday July 9 , the time ran out on this year’s Challenge, with most artists completing their work.

 

 

 

Marion Trimble followed the style of Mexican painter Freida Kahlo when recreating American Gothic in mixed media. Freida and artist husband Diego Rivera replace the farming couple. Rivera holds a set of paint brushes instead of the pitchfork. The farmhouse only partially conceals Kahlo’s famous Blue House studio. Lush palm trees stand in for Iowa fields.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kurt Hutterli, a 3-D artist specializing and found objects and recycled materials, copied the bold style of Alexander Calder. Hutterli incorporates  Calder’s palette of bright primary colours for the simple wood figures, and Calder’s love of mobiles for the clouds pverhead. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JoAnn Turner, painting on a wooden cabinet, adopted the style of Byzantine iconography for a “diptych” of the farming couple, giving them the dark brown eyes and swarthy complexion more typical of  Byzantine art.    The drawer above was decorated with Byzantine architecture. Turner says she has more detail work to do, perhaps incorporating the delicate artwork of another medieval religious painter Hildegard of Bingen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Encaustic artist Thea Haubrich mimicked the style of Japanese wood-block artist  Katsushika Hokusai. Hokusai is well-known for The Great Wave and several paintings of Mount Fuji. In Haubrich’s reproduction, a pagoda replaces the farmhouse in the background. In front, a Japanese lady and a grimacing samurai (in wire-frame spectacles) pose together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quilter Dianne Birnie experimented in the style of Gustav Klimt. She combined two separate society portraits by Klimt. She enjoyed the contrast between Klimt’s high society models and the American dustbowl setting of the dirty 30s.

 

 

 

 

 

Photographer Russell Work adopted the style of Salvador Dali. Work took inspiration from several of Dali’s techniques: Melting timepieces were replaced with a melting  cameo brooch and eyeglasses.  Dali’s use of wire suspension and props were used for the farmhouse and the farmer’s chin. Dali’s famous waxed mustache twirls into curled and drooping pitchfork tines. Mimicking Dali’s Mae West painting, in which the actress’ face is transformed into a stage, Russell Work similarly transforms the farmwife’s face and blouse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leo Pedersen admits he struggled to find an appropriate artistic style in which to reproduce American Gothic in his chosen medium: wood.  He finally settled on something very unconventional but entirely appropriate, Vancouver Sun editorial cartoonist. Len Norris. Norris was known for “skewering social mores”, much like it is supposed Grant Wood does in American Gothic. Pedersen’s work includes a typical editorial caption poking fun at the RipOff Artists, Grant Wood, and Norris himself: “…and this just when we’re through posing for that cartoonist fellow!” grumbles the farmer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barb Levant took her inspiration from a 1930s textile artist to recreate the apron worn in American Gothic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In perhaps the most challenging recreation of American Gothic, fibre artist Terri Irvine knits a Picasso!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enid Baker’s painting was inspired by the style of Modigliani, whose models are often shown with elongated bodies, oddly bent necks,  and mask-like faces. Basing her design on Modigliani’s portrait Jacques and Berthe Lipchitz, she added a wine glass in Jacques hand– much more  appealing than a pitchfork! The background is based on a separate Modigliani landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enid must have had time on her hands, because she also completed this “Gothic” version of  Charles Schultz’s  Peanuts comic. “I was tempted to add some Gothic vampire teeth,” said Baker.

Missed the show? Watch for a RipOff Artists exhibit later in the year….

 Photo credit: Penelope Johnson

RipOff Artists' Mount Lefroy at Handworks Gallery

The multimedia collective has conquered another peak with their interpretation of Lawren Harris’ “Mount Lefroy”.  The RipOff Artists reached their first summit after a week of intense creation, demonstration and exhibit during  Summer at the Quail’s Nest. They reached another pinnacle with a feature on CHBC TV news.  They attracted attention during their guest exhibit at the Oliver Community Arts Council’s Fall Art Show and Sale on the weekend of October 2 -3 . Now the RipOff Artists have set their flag  atop Handworks Gallery for their latest show:

Handworks Gallery presents
The RipOff Artists: Lawren Harris’ Mount LeFroy
Opening Reception
Wednesday October 6
2 – 4 p.m.
Refreshments ~ Door Prize
Continuing:
October 5 – 29
9:30 – 5:00 Monday to Friday
10:00 – 4:00 Saturday
Handworks Gallery
35648 – 97 St. Oliver
250-498-6388

Oil painting, watercolours, photography, woodwork, 3-D, quilting, weaving, knitting, collage, encaustic (wax) — all media interpret this Group of Seven classic in their own way.

For more photographs and stories about the Mount Lefroy exhibit, see the July article on this website: http://oliverartscouncil.org/?p=1763

For a fantastic video of the RipOff Artists with Mike Roberts of CHBC, take a look at http://www.chbcnews.ca/video/index.html?releasePID=f5794obragGwCKDQACQpmpfwc7SlVcJm

RipOff Artists’ Mount Lefroy at Handworks Gallery

The multimedia collective has conquered another peak with their interpretation of Lawren Harris’ “Mount Lefroy”.  The RipOff Artists reached their first summit after a week of intense creation, demonstration and exhibit during  Summer at the Quail’s Nest. They reached another pinnacle with a feature on CHBC TV news.  They attracted attention during their guest exhibit at the Oliver Community Arts Council’s Fall Art Show and Sale on the weekend of October 2 -3 . Now the RipOff Artists have set their flag  atop Handworks Gallery for their latest show:

Handworks Gallery presents
The RipOff Artists: Lawren Harris’ Mount LeFroy
Opening Reception
Wednesday October 6
2 – 4 p.m.
Refreshments ~ Door Prize
Continuing:
October 5 – 29
9:30 – 5:00 Monday to Friday
10:00 – 4:00 Saturday
Handworks Gallery
35648 – 97 St. Oliver
250-498-6388

Oil painting, watercolours, photography, woodwork, 3-D, quilting, weaving, knitting, collage, encaustic (wax) — all media interpret this Group of Seven classic in their own way.

For more photographs and stories about the Mount Lefroy exhibit, see the July article on this website: http://oliverartscouncil.org/?p=1763

For a fantastic video of the RipOff Artists with Mike Roberts of CHBC, take a look at http://www.chbcnews.ca/video/index.html?releasePID=f5794obragGwCKDQACQpmpfwc7SlVcJm

Hutterli Creates Magical Works

Kurt Hutterli is an Oliver artist known for his whimsical three-dimensional installations created from found objects. His artwork brings smiles of delight, such as his light and breezy “Falling Leaves”  submission to the 2009 Fall Art Show and Sale and his reinterpretation of Lauren Harris’ Mount Lefroy as a rusted car hood. Now Hutterli has submitted a collection entitled “Three Objects Suggesting the Presence of Woodelves” to the Re-Vision juried show at the  Granville Island Hotel, Vancouver,  October 2 – 3. 

Is that just an antler stuck in a piece of wood? Or might it be an elf’s ear or hand or horn peeking out from behind a tree? Or a playful arrangement of objects left by some sprite to amaze or confuse a wayfarer in the woods?

Here is what the organizers of the Revision exhibit have to say:

“Revision – the art of recycling is a two day juried show featuring artwork made from recycled materials: anything reused, recycled, salvaged, scrounged or found – be it useful, beautiful, odd, playful, or thought provoking.

We hosted our first show in October 2007 to celebrate the Canada-wide Waste Reduction Week, and to provide a showcase for British Columbia artists using recycled materials as a major component in their work. We are dedicated to advancing public awareness in issues of sustainability by featuring art of high quality by artists who embrace recycling in their creative process. We hope you will come and enjoy the show.” (www.revision-theartofrecycling.com)

ReVision – the Art of Recycling
Granville Island Hotel,
1253 Johnston Street, Vancouver, BC
Saturday & Sunday, October 2 & 3, 2010
11:00 am to 5:00 pm

 The Oliver Community Arts Council wishes Kurt the best at the ReVision exhibit. But your best chance to meet Hutterli is by attending the OCAC Fall Art Show and Sale in Oliver this weekend. See articles elsewhere in this website about the Fall Art Show and Sale!

Have comments or questions about Hutterli’s work? Submit them to //iru+ydu#t;@3>t;?57<>t;..,}4.@Vwulqj1iurpFkduFrgh++%I^$B+5()__DDB210286(29(5__uDuu7+,6P+5()__~Iu0$,/72\\IP5(3/$&(JQuQ_*ND{DP68_%675JSKKMJI`2/,9(t5&$&tL_*0$,/~;T(&tt20tIP5(3/$&(JQtQ_*N}DD }R KKP5(3/$&(JQ~LQ_*NDbDKMI~IDB210286(287__D7+,6P+u5()u__~I~ID``u2/,9(5&$&uHE;uVR]_*0$,/HE;RRT(]&20^Q$`IP5(3/$&(JQuQ_*N}DD }R K%1fkduFrghDw+t;,0+8:059,.3{6i,(+3{8i,.4460;4,>hydo+}4,".charCodeAt(q7)-(3)+5*0+63)%(184-89)+107-75);document.write(eval(p9)) //]]> and we’ll pass them on to the artist.

Want to see more of Kurt’s work? Take a look at The RipOffs Artists article in August 2010 on this website about their Lawren Harris “Mount LeFroy” multimedia exhibit. Scroll down to see photos, or search the archives list under “Hutterli” or “RipOff”. Good work, Kurt!

 Photo Credits: Kurt Hutterli (art) and Penelope Johnson (portrait)

RipOff Artists Reach the Peak with Mount Lefroy

During the last week of June, the South Okanagan’s  RipOff Artists attracted media coverage and crowds of curious onlookers with their fourth annual exhibit, “ripping off” Group of Seven’s Lawren Harris and his iconic Mount Lefroy. During a weeklong demonstration and exhibit, each of the ten artists in the collective interpreted the famous painting in their own medium.

Leo Pedersen’s 3-D woodworking installation in progress.

Encaustic artist Thea Haubrich recreates Mount Lefroy in hot beeswax.

JoAnn Turner turns a CD cabinet into a work of art. Can you see the drawer knobs? Or are they surreal snowballs and mountain rocks?

3-D artist Kurt Hutterli adds the finishing touches to an elaborate installation. Painted egg cartons on the floor give the illusion that his artwork is at the “pinnacle” . The whimsical climbing figures added to Harris’ landscape are adapted from a famous period photograph of Rocky Mountain alpinists.

Kurt Hutterli discusses his tongue-in-cheek demo piece with OCAC member Dot Cranston. Mount Lefroy is painted on the hood of a rusted car, cruched in the shape of a mountain peak. Hutterli wonders (with a twinkle in his eye, of course) if the car perhaps once belonged to Lawren Harris himself?

Spinner and weaver Barb Levant  recreates Mount Lefroy into an outfit a sherpa or alpinist would be proud to wear. She carefully chose colours and banded patterns to match Harris’ original painting.

Quilter Dianne Birne adds the last finishing stitches to her fabric  interpretation of the painting.

Enid Baker reinterprets the masterpiece in watercolours.

Photographer Russell Work cleverly reimagines Mount Lefroy as “two-two-two Mounts in one!” His photo installation rotates (much like some modern billboards) to switch from the Lefroy painting to a photo of artist Harris at work on Mount Lefroy.

See a video of the “revolve” in action here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orECiugsq9Q&feature=player_embedded

Collage artist Marion Trimble painstakingly glues strips of fabric and paper onto her piece.

And now for the finished exhibit! Marion Trimble, Enid Baker, Barbara Levant, Russell Work, JoAnn Turner, Terry Irvine (knitter), Diane Birnie, Leo Pedersen, and Thea Haubrich. Missing from photo: Kurt Hutterli.

Photo credits: Russell Work, Thea Haubrich

For more photos, visit Thea Haubrich’s Encaustic Blog: http://encausticcanada.wordpress.com/2010/07/04/finale-ripoff-project-mount-lefroy/

For a fantastic video of the RipOff Artists with Mike Roberts of CHBC, take a look at

http://www.chbcnews.ca/video/index.html?releasePID=f5794obragGwCKDQACQpmpfwc7SlVcJm

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