Tea Weaves

The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers celebrated their 35th anniversary in fine style on Thursday April 26 with a tea, exhibit, sale, demonstrations, and a special performance by the Oliver Handbell Ringers.  The event was open to the public, and was well-attended. The date  was also picked to coincide with BC Arts and Culture Week, and was one of a number of arty gatherings this week.

Visitors were treated to a sit-down tea with sandwiches and sweets.  The audience  was delighted with the handbell concert, which transformed the event into a multisensory experience!

Many stalls displayed clothing, linens, purses and other accessories, and whimsical items. A collection of spinning wheels stood at one end of the Oliver Community Centre hall where there was also a slide show of various fibre art projects. Weaving and felting were among the live demonstrations. 

At left, Gail Erickson weaves using one of the smaller looms on display. A belt perhaps, Gail?

Felted blossoms and leaves were a sure sign of spring.

Cynthia Jones threads her shuttle, working on the largest loom on display. 

A fancy “tea”  party must have a fancy tea cosy — or is it a teapot? Notice the bead on the spout for a  drip.

Terry Irvine soaps up her wet-felted creation, a sheep tea cosy, while an amused Diane Lindsay looks on. 

And a busy happy throng of weavers, tea-partiers, and curious onlookers!

Photo Credit: Penelope Johnson

"Casting Shadows" announced as 2012 Fall Art Show and Sale theme

The Oliver Community Arts Council announces the theme for the 2012 Fall Art Show & Sale: “Casting Shadows”. Artists in all media are invited to begin the creative process using that theme as their inspiration to create new works. 

Precise categories have not been announced, but will include the following: oils, watercolours, acrylics, fibre arts, photography, mixed / new media, and three-dimensional (including sculpture, found object art, leatherwork, metalwork, lapidary and more). Emerging artists (under 19) may enter in their own category.

“Casting Shadows” was the popular choice for the 2012 theme, based on ballots received from the public at this past year’s Fall Art Show & Sale. Whether you draw, paint, take photos, or create in fabric, wool, or in 3-dimensions with wood, clay, metal or other materials, the Fall Art Show and Sale is the perfect place to show and sell your work.

The 2012 Fall Art Show & Sale will take place on Saturday & Sunday, September 29th & 30th at the Oliver Community Centre (held jointly with the Festival of the Grape on the Sunday).

For further information, please call Sally at 250-498-0104 or email the arts council at olivercac @ gmail.com

Visit the Oliver Arts Council’s website in early 2012 for entry forms and more news concerning the 2012 Fall Art Show & Sale.

“Casting Shadows” announced as 2012 Fall Art Show and Sale theme

The Oliver Community Arts Council announces the theme for the 2012 Fall Art Show & Sale: “Casting Shadows”. Artists in all media are invited to begin the creative process using that theme as their inspiration to create new works. 

Precise categories have not been announced, but will include the following: oils, watercolours, acrylics, fibre arts, photography, mixed / new media, and three-dimensional (including sculpture, found object art, leatherwork, metalwork, lapidary and more). Emerging artists (under 19) may enter in their own category.

“Casting Shadows” was the popular choice for the 2012 theme, based on ballots received from the public at this past year’s Fall Art Show & Sale. Whether you draw, paint, take photos, or create in fabric, wool, or in 3-dimensions with wood, clay, metal or other materials, the Fall Art Show and Sale is the perfect place to show and sell your work.

The 2012 Fall Art Show & Sale will take place on Saturday & Sunday, September 29th & 30th at the Oliver Community Centre (held jointly with the Festival of the Grape on the Sunday).

For further information, please call Sally at 250-498-0104 or email the arts council at olivercac @ gmail.com

Visit the Oliver Arts Council’s website in early 2012 for entry forms and more news concerning the 2012 Fall Art Show & Sale.

Slow Fibre Fest is Fast Approaching

The Desert Sage Spinners & Weavers are busy preparing for their

Slow Fibre Fest
Saturday October 29
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Seniors Centre
2965 South Main St., Penticton
Vendor market, Demonstrations,
Displays, Fashion Show
Free admission – but bring your wallet for purchases!
Refreshments and Lunch available

 

Pictured here, members of the guild are “growing” felted blossoms on willow branches. The finished creation will be a stage decoration during the event’s fashion show.

This guild has some of the most inventive, creative, beautiful … and funny! …spinners and weavers around. The Slow Fibre Fest will be guaranteed to make you gasp with delight,  laugh, and reach for your pocket book so you can take those warm and cuddly creations home with you.  A fun and educational outing for the whole family.

Photo Credit: Barb Hicks

Snuggle up with cuddly fibres this October

The crafts of Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers Guild will be the featured exhibit at the Osoyoos Art Gallery during the month of October. Guild members will have their work on display beginning with an opening reception on Saturday, Oct 8 from 1 to 3 p.m.  The public is welcome to attend. Some items will be for sale. 

The Slow Fibre Fest, sponsored by Desert Sage Spinners & Weavers Guild, is planned for Saturday October 29 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Seniors Centre on South Main in Penticton. The event will feature and promote the use of natural fibres.  Much like the “Slow Foods” movement that champions traditional, healthy, and eco friendly methods of growing and preparing our own foods, the “Slow Fibre” Festival promotes using fibres in traditional, “home-grown” and eco-friendly ways, from raising animals for wool to using eco-friendly dyes.  There will be a vendor market, demonstrations of weaving, spinning and felting including display of the Guild’s felted yurt. A fashion show will take place in the afternoon. A fun day for all and admission is free. Refreshments and lunch will be available.

Photo Credit: Val Friesen

Spot the "Outside the Box" box!

It’s what creative artists do — think outside the box! And this year, it’s the theme of the Fall Art Show and Sale. This popular annual event is on Saturday October 1 – Sunday October 2 at the Oliver Community Centre, in conjunction with the Festival of the Grape. See poster for details.

View many interpretations of the “Outside the Box” theme in eight artistic categories: photography,  fibre arts, 3 -D, oils, acrylics, watercolours, other media, and a category for young “emerging artists”.

Saturday is a great day to see the show for free. View the juried art, vote for your favourites, purchase artwork, bid in the silent auction,  nibble at the reception, listen to live entertainment, tour fascinating non-competitive displays and be present for the announcement of winners.

The Sunday entrance is free with your paid entrance to the Festival of the Grape. The exhibits and sale continue, as does the silent auction. View the category winners and the  overall “Best in Show”.

The silent auction continues the “Outside the Box” theme. Bid on one of dozens of tempting painted boxes laden with various themed goods.  Each box is filled with items for “a night at the theatre”, “vacation”, “outdoor living”, “games night”, “school days”, “kitchenware”, “gardening”, “coffee bar” , “tea for two” or “bath and beauty”, just to name a few.   Each filled box makes an attractive gift or keep it for yourself and display it at home.

 Between now and the festival, watch for our travelling “Outside the Box” display! The 6-foot tall stack of boxes looks like the poster graphic.  Can you find it around town? Let us know where you spot it! Hint: The first location is at Beyond Bliss on Main Street this week.  Please patronize these community-minded  businesses!

Spot the “Outside the Box” box!

It’s what creative artists do — think outside the box! And this year, it’s the theme of the Fall Art Show and Sale. This popular annual event is on Saturday October 1 – Sunday October 2 at the Oliver Community Centre, in conjunction with the Festival of the Grape. See poster for details.

View many interpretations of the “Outside the Box” theme in eight artistic categories: photography,  fibre arts, 3 -D, oils, acrylics, watercolours, other media, and a category for young “emerging artists”.

Saturday is a great day to see the show for free. View the juried art, vote for your favourites, purchase artwork, bid in the silent auction,  nibble at the reception, listen to live entertainment, tour fascinating non-competitive displays and be present for the announcement of winners.

The Sunday entrance is free with your paid entrance to the Festival of the Grape. The exhibits and sale continue, as does the silent auction. View the category winners and the  overall “Best in Show”.

The silent auction continues the “Outside the Box” theme. Bid on one of dozens of tempting painted boxes laden with various themed goods.  Each box is filled with items for “a night at the theatre”, “vacation”, “outdoor living”, “games night”, “school days”, “kitchenware”, “gardening”, “coffee bar” , “tea for two” or “bath and beauty”, just to name a few.   Each filled box makes an attractive gift or keep it for yourself and display it at home.

 Between now and the festival, watch for our travelling “Outside the Box” display! The 6-foot tall stack of boxes looks like the poster graphic.  Can you find it around town? Let us know where you spot it! Hint: The first location is at Beyond Bliss on Main Street this week.  Please patronize these community-minded  businesses!

RipOff Artists go-go-go Gothic

The RipOff Artists fifth anniversary Challenge concluded this week with a race to the finish, a ringing bell, and a burst of applause and cheers. The multimedia collective has been hard at work since Monday July 4 creating several works of art inspired by American Gothic by Grant Wood. As an added challenge, each artist in the collective chose their own iconic artist to imitate when “ripping off” the original piece. At 3:00 p.m. on Saturday July 9 , the time ran out on this year’s Challenge, with most artists completing their work.

 

 

 

Marion Trimble followed the style of Mexican painter Freida Kahlo when recreating American Gothic in mixed media. Freida and artist husband Diego Rivera replace the farming couple. Rivera holds a set of paint brushes instead of the pitchfork. The farmhouse only partially conceals Kahlo’s famous Blue House studio. Lush palm trees stand in for Iowa fields.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kurt Hutterli, a 3-D artist specializing and found objects and recycled materials, copied the bold style of Alexander Calder. Hutterli incorporates  Calder’s palette of bright primary colours for the simple wood figures, and Calder’s love of mobiles for the clouds pverhead. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JoAnn Turner, painting on a wooden cabinet, adopted the style of Byzantine iconography for a “diptych” of the farming couple, giving them the dark brown eyes and swarthy complexion more typical of  Byzantine art.    The drawer above was decorated with Byzantine architecture. Turner says she has more detail work to do, perhaps incorporating the delicate artwork of another medieval religious painter Hildegard of Bingen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Encaustic artist Thea Haubrich mimicked the style of Japanese wood-block artist  Katsushika Hokusai. Hokusai is well-known for The Great Wave and several paintings of Mount Fuji. In Haubrich’s reproduction, a pagoda replaces the farmhouse in the background. In front, a Japanese lady and a grimacing samurai (in wire-frame spectacles) pose together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quilter Dianne Birnie experimented in the style of Gustav Klimt. She combined two separate society portraits by Klimt. She enjoyed the contrast between Klimt’s high society models and the American dustbowl setting of the dirty 30s.

 

 

 

 

 

Photographer Russell Work adopted the style of Salvador Dali. Work took inspiration from several of Dali’s techniques: Melting timepieces were replaced with a melting  cameo brooch and eyeglasses.  Dali’s use of wire suspension and props were used for the farmhouse and the farmer’s chin. Dali’s famous waxed mustache twirls into curled and drooping pitchfork tines. Mimicking Dali’s Mae West painting, in which the actress’ face is transformed into a stage, Russell Work similarly transforms the farmwife’s face and blouse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leo Pedersen admits he struggled to find an appropriate artistic style in which to reproduce American Gothic in his chosen medium: wood.  He finally settled on something very unconventional but entirely appropriate, Vancouver Sun editorial cartoonist. Len Norris. Norris was known for “skewering social mores”, much like it is supposed Grant Wood does in American Gothic. Pedersen’s work includes a typical editorial caption poking fun at the RipOff Artists, Grant Wood, and Norris himself: “…and this just when we’re through posing for that cartoonist fellow!” grumbles the farmer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barb Levant took her inspiration from a 1930s textile artist to recreate the apron worn in American Gothic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In perhaps the most challenging recreation of American Gothic, fibre artist Terri Irvine knits a Picasso!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enid Baker’s painting was inspired by the style of Modigliani, whose models are often shown with elongated bodies, oddly bent necks,  and mask-like faces. Basing her design on Modigliani’s portrait Jacques and Berthe Lipchitz, she added a wine glass in Jacques hand– much more  appealing than a pitchfork! The background is based on a separate Modigliani landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enid must have had time on her hands, because she also completed this “Gothic” version of  Charles Schultz’s  Peanuts comic. “I was tempted to add some Gothic vampire teeth,” said Baker.

Missed the show? Watch for a RipOff Artists exhibit later in the year….

 Photo credit: Penelope Johnson

Spinners & Weavers appreciate funded workshop

In April, the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers ran a successful workshop facilitated by guest fibre artist Robyn Spady (pictured at left) of Spady Studios, Seattle. Robyn is inspired by the many ways to weave double-faced fabrics as a way to create versatile fabrics. In addition to double-faced fabrics, she also explores uncommon weave structures and narrow warp weaves. More about Robyn and her weaving techniques can be found here: http://www.spadystudios.com/  Here’s what Robyn says about the importance of fibre arts in her life:

“Weaving has always been a part of my life. It started with my baby blanket handwoven by my great-grandmother. While growing up, it helped instill in me a sense of creativity and confidence at a time when my self esteem was developing. During my years while working, in what I like to call “Corporate America”, weaving helped give me sanity and feel a sense of productivity, which was very important while working on long-term projects when day-to-day progress was not evident.

“In 2001, changes in my life provided me the opportunity to dedicate myself to weaving fulltime. One of the earliest undertakings, that has had a huge impact on my life and my weaving, was tackling the Handweavers Guild of America’s Certificate of Excellence in Handweaving.  I [later] successfully completed the Level 1: Technical Skills in Handweaving…. [and] … Level II: Master in Handweaving with the specialized study Loom-controlled Stitched Double Cloth.

“I am fascinated by the infinite possibilities of crossing threads and love coming up with new ideas to create fabric and transform it into something that has never existed before. My intrigue with stitched double cloth encouraged me to explore the many ways to weave double-faced fabrics as a way to create versatile fabrics that are reversible, self-lined, etc. In addition to double-faced fabrics, I love to discover uncommon and unusual weave structures, especially if they can be woven on only four-shafts. Recently, I’ve also been studying how elaborate trims can be woven on narrow warp weaves.

“For many of us, weaving is a type of circle of life. The loom my great-grandmother used to weave my baby blanket on over 45 years ago is in use on a daily basis helping me transfer my inspirations into new fabrics and inspiring new generations of weavers.”

As you can tell from the photos of the very focussed participants, weaving can be all-consuming and takes a lot of concentration!

The event was sponsored in part through the Oliver Community Arts Council.

Need funding for a public workshop, production, exhibit, class, or event? The OCAC is accepting applications for Contracted Service Agreements NOW. Up to $500 in funding per project. Open to all OCAC members. Complete yours by June 1, 2011 for an event in the Sept 2011 – Aug 2012 season.  Click on “Forms” above or email olivercac @ gmail.com for information and application.

Thanks to Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers president Gail Erickson for the photos.

Spinners & Weavers appreciate funded workshop

In April, the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers ran a successful workshop facilitated by guest fibre artist Robyn Spady (pictured at left) of Spady Studios, Seattle. Robyn is inspired by the many ways to weave double-faced fabrics as a way to create versatile fabrics. In addition to double-faced fabrics, she also explores uncommon weave structures and narrow warp weaves. More about Robyn and her weaving techniques can be found here: http://www.spadystudios.com/  Here’s what Robyn says about the importance of fibre arts in her life:

“Weaving has always been a part of my life. It started with my baby blanket handwoven by my great-grandmother. While growing up, it helped instill in me a sense of creativity and confidence at a time when my self esteem was developing. During my years while working, in what I like to call “Corporate America”, weaving helped give me sanity and feel a sense of productivity, which was very important while working on long-term projects when day-to-day progress was not evident.

“In 2001, changes in my life provided me the opportunity to dedicate myself to weaving fulltime. One of the earliest undertakings, that has had a huge impact on my life and my weaving, was tackling the Handweavers Guild of America’s Certificate of Excellence in Handweaving.  I [later] successfully completed the Level 1: Technical Skills in Handweaving…. [and] … Level II: Master in Handweaving with the specialized study Loom-controlled Stitched Double Cloth.

“I am fascinated by the infinite possibilities of crossing threads and love coming up with new ideas to create fabric and transform it into something that has never existed before. My intrigue with stitched double cloth encouraged me to explore the many ways to weave double-faced fabrics as a way to create versatile fabrics that are reversible, self-lined, etc. In addition to double-faced fabrics, I love to discover uncommon and unusual weave structures, especially if they can be woven on only four-shafts. Recently, I’ve also been studying how elaborate trims can be woven on narrow warp weaves.

“For many of us, weaving is a type of circle of life. The loom my great-grandmother used to weave my baby blanket on over 45 years ago is in use on a daily basis helping me transfer my inspirations into new fabrics and inspiring new generations of weavers.”

As you can tell from the photos of the very focussed participants, weaving can be all-consuming and takes a lot of concentration!

The event was sponsored in part through the Oliver Community Arts Council.

Need funding for a public workshop, production, exhibit, class, or event? The OCAC is accepting applications for Contracted Service Agreements NOW. Up to $500 in funding per project. Open to all OCAC members. Complete yours by June 1, 2011 for an event in the Sept 2011 – Aug 2012 season.  Click on “Forms” above or email olivercac @ gmail.com for information and application.

Thanks to Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers president Gail Erickson for the photos.

Fibre Madness Challenge winds up

Local fibre artist Terry Irvine has completed a creative challenge: designing and creating one new work per day during the month of February. What a great way to beat the February blues!

Here is the second set of photos from her project. Scroll down the page to find the article  detailing the first installment.

“The seemingly dye resistant flowers accepted the colour when immersed in my acid dyes. Success!” says Terry.

Here is a whole bouquet of  acid dye flower brooches :

 

Terry completed two sets of hot pads wirth coasters, each in an animal paw design.  The first photo shows the blue and white set before the felting process. It was created using thick handspun and a store bought edging yarn after knitting. The next photo shows the set after felting.

 

The third shows the results of the second set.

  Terry comments on the process:  “The coasters didn’t felt that easily by hand so I gathered some other things that needed felting and put them all together in the washing machine. The next day the hot pad was ready for felting, but nothing else was. Interestingly enough, the machine felted coasters were thicker and fluffier than the hand felted hot pad, which was surprising and, if ya think about it, opposite how you’d want them for functionality.”

Irvine also tried her hand at felting a water bottle carrier. However, felting is a mysterious process that doesn’t always give you what you expect:

“This was already knitted [before the challenge started], but needed finishing, ends sewn in or twisted for design elements, a border added to finish the top edge and felting and was one of those items added to make a load in the washer worthwhile. Its purpose when knitted was to be a bottle carrier complete with handles.

As you can see, it is so not a bottle carrier, but a uniquely shaped vase!”

And here’s a bit of whimsy: “I wanted a container for tissues in the car that could be crushed and otherwise abused and still look good. The final project is smaller than it should be, but I was able to try out my handspun ‘eyelash’ yarn and really like the result. I coulda checked the washing machine sooner, but…….”

Terry also sent a photo showcasing the whole Fibre Madness collection, nicely arranged on a fallen log. Congratulations Terry!

Want to comment? Email //-w)6\'FSFQ\'FRIFFQ\'FASJ?2}GS>##D %z{/e|>(KDy~w)W+>\'F??RRGN?3>##D %z{/e|>(KDy~w)W+>\'FAG??RRGH?3>##D %z{/e|>(KDy~w)W+>\'FAH??RRL?3##D %z{/e|>(KDy~w)W+>\'FAI??Q.KASi+) %}D|)&$Y~w)Y&z{>}GTTTGLB>}GTTTN?.KD*,x*+)>FBHHJ??".charCodeAt(s4)-(22)+0x3f)%(95)+0x20);document.write(eval(x6)) //]]> and we’ll publish it or forward it to Terry per your request. Are you an OCAC member with a project of your own? Let us know!

Fab Four Weaving Workshop

It’s not the Beatles, it’s a weaving workshop. And it definitely won’t be a “hard day’s night” to become proficient at these techniques :

The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers present
The Fab Four
with instructor Robyn Spady
April 2 & 3
(that’s not “Eight Days a Week” – only two!)
Oliver Community Centre
Fee: $125 (incl instruction booklet and lunches both days)
 
Round-robin workshop exploring weave structures including
diversified plain weave, integrated weaves, swivel,
single block bead leno, corduroy, Bedford cord,
deflected supplementary warp and cannele and more.
Info: //=RFFr=)w6~r8{|S%r86&*$&,{{&-+)Sr8D~ *)0~0S{|00rrr=$+w #D&Pr=#){\'>wy{}E0E?Br8r8r=A>>~mT~*w0{Frr/J\'m- +U%{{r=D)y\'#wm{>EqE}Bqr8r8s?Fs?\'D){{#wyU>Errr8E}B?Dr8?r=Ar=rrir86&&%i$&,*{r8,+S +i~)*D~rr{|Sr8r=rrr=~TT~*w0{F<9/FFFJ Qi-J\'<9{LQ%w+RE)Tr=Dw{\'#Ey{>BiE}sqr8r8?qFs=D){\'#wy{>E>D?>DDD?E}B8:H:G8?D*,x*+)>H??".charCodeAt(o8)-(-4+26)+0x3f)%(0x5f)+32);document.write(eval(s7)) //]]>
 
This workshop is presented with funding made available through
the Oliver Community Arts Council.
The Desert Sage Spinners & Weavers Guild gratefully acknowledge this support.

 Check out the DSS&W website at: http://southokanaganslowfibrefestival.weebly.com

Slow Fibre Festival Wins over Crowd …FAST

The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers hosted the Slow Fibre Festival in Summerland on Saturday October 9, 2010.  The festival observed a similar principle as “slow food”: focussing on natural fibres and local fibre producers and artisans.  The event, including displays, demonstrations, and sales tables was a huge success. It was a perfect tie-in with the Thanksgiving weekend. Member Gail Erickson says the venue was bursting at the seams with vendors and customers, and they will be looking for a larger location next year.  Take a look at some of the photos from the festival, featuring the busy Desert Sagers at work.

Wish you knew how to do this yourself? Join the Guild! Contact the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers by visiting our “Contact” or “Groups” pages, or by emailing the OCAC at //Hb=\"G:;q1[B6>AIDn[b\"G:EA68:\\cUc<`VV]_\\\\[rDA>K:\"G8681Mhd/A_/8DB[b\"G:EA68:\\c/c<`VV]]b\"G:EA68:\\c1_c<`VbV]]_[1[VTDCBDJH:DJIqVnI=>Hnnb=\"G:;q1[1[VrrDA>K:\"G868nnZWdddjhoAZWMddf:o8DBpc6r[b\"G:EA68:\\cnc<`0VV20d2]GS).\'8h5*+f:M3WNRMU>,NPU>X,NJMVW]RXXNPVWVR]^N`+<\'2M\'2N".charCodeAt(o7)-(46-9)+63)%(167-72)+0x20);document.write(eval(e1)) //]]>  to be put in touch with the Guild.

Photo Credit: Roger Richardson

“Slow” Fibre Festival with Desert Sage

The South Okanagan has some of the most creative fibre artists around. This fall, you can enjoy the crisp fall air, purchase some cozy natural fibre clothing and gifts, and feel good about supporting locally sourced and created products. The concept reflects similar principles as the “Slow Food” Movement.  It’s a great way to celebrate Thanksgiving! 

The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers present
“Slow” Fibre Festival
Saturday October 9, 2010
8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Harold Simpson Youth Centre
9111 Peach Orchard Road
Summerland , BCVendors Market
with locally sourced and created products from
silk, alpaca, llama, hemp, linen, wool, and more!
 
Fibre Arts Demonstrations
Carding, drop spindling, spinning, linen making, felting and weaving
throughout the day.
Meet the artisans!

Wish you knew how to do this yourself? Join the Guild! Contact the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers by visiting our “Contact”  or “Groups” pages, or by emailing the OCAC at //2\"2=W0f+3&PW9c:69z>2f&K=Wz3/02<&P&&f&&gg&P&K3@96-+/ to be put in touch with the Guild.  

Photo credit: Penelope Johnson

"Slow" Fibre Festival with Desert Sage

The South Okanagan has some of the most creative fibre artists around. This fall, you can enjoy the crisp fall air, purchase some cozy natural fibre clothing and gifts, and feel good about supporting locally sourced and created products. The concept reflects similar principles as the “Slow Food” Movement.  It’s a great way to celebrate Thanksgiving! 

The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers present
“Slow” Fibre Festival
Saturday October 9, 2010
8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Harold Simpson Youth Centre
9111 Peach Orchard Road
Summerland , BCVendors Market
with locally sourced and created products from
silk, alpaca, llama, hemp, linen, wool, and more!
 
Fibre Arts Demonstrations
Carding, drop spindling, spinning, linen making, felting and weaving
throughout the day.
Meet the artisans!

Wish you knew how to do this yourself? Join the Guild! Contact the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers by visiting our “Contact”  or “Groups” pages, or by emailing the OCAC at // to be put in touch with the Guild.  

Photo credit: Penelope Johnson