RipOff Artists bring colour to Ansel Adams’ Warehouses

As their name suggests, the RipOff Artists are a cheeky bunch. Not content to let famous artists rest, the group chooses lesser-known works by the great masters and reinterprets them — each in their own medium.  In previous years, this multimedia collective of local artists has tackled van Gogh, Klimt, the Group of Seven’s Lawren Harris, Georgia O’Keeffe , and others.

In 2012 the artists took on the challenge of  “ripping off” the famous American landscape photographer, Ansel Adams, by reimagining his black and white images as colour.  The group gathered for their annual Challenge Week August 6 – 11 at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre.  Working in colourful yarn, paints, threads, cloth, and digital images,  the RipOff Artists brought new energy and life to one of his little-known photographs, “San Francisco Warehouses”.  Not simply adding colour,  many of the RipOff artists added humourous touches, changed the geographical location, or even included sociological and environmental messages in their adaptations.

Their week in studio is set as a “challenge” in which each artist must complete their interpretation within a set time, before the bell rings on Saturday afternoon.

The public was invited to watch them at work throughout the week. Besides chatting with each RipOff Artist about their work, they could view displays outlining Adam’s life, work, and theories of photography, as well as the RipOffs’ own background research on colour, materials used, and artistic styles.

Enid Baker, quilter, selected warm tones that contrasted with the Depression era black and white photograph, first painting on cloth, then sewing the pieces together (top photo). Baker decided the Depression definitely needed a facewlift!

Terry Irvine, fibre artists first dyed her fibres choosing symbolic colours representing the various zodiacal signs in her family. She then wet felted the wool fibres until they formed a bright and whimsical picture. Terry envisioned a post-apocalyptic version of the San Fransisco warehouses, when  flora and fauna have taken over the dingy neighbourhood. Sheep, birds, and even honeybees cavort among the abandoned, vine-covered buildings.

Russell Work, photographer, found new inspiration at the last minute. Originally he had planned to digitally add single colours to a series of black and white reproductions of Adams’  photo, creating a panel of repeating images, each in their own hue.  During the RipOff Artist challenge week, he was suddenly inspired by the sight of Oliver’s rooftops to hunt out buildings around town with similar  architectural designs to those in the original artwork, photograph them, and digitally cut and paste them together to form a modern-day collage  with the same geometric angles in Adam’s work.

Russell spent considerable time looking for a smokestack to incorporate into the photo, but trips to the industrial area proved fruitless. He even stopped the driver of a transport truck, asking him to belch some fumes from his exhaust. he was told, by the driver and others working in the industrial area, that current practices have eliminated harmful smoke and exhaust. Russell was happy to eliminate the smoke from his digital adaptation, saying the ecological message was a profound one.

Besides printing a finished photograph, he displayed the image on computer as a “transmogrification” from Ansel’s original black and white, to Russell’s “Oliver Warehouses”. A separate photograph labels each roof and piece of corrugated siding with building names and streets for easy Oliver reference.

JoAnn Turner, painting on wood, revelled in having four “canvases” to work on. Her choice of material was a plain pine firewood box. Each side of the box was painted in a different style: a faithful reproduction of the original black and white, a sepia-toned version, a colour reproduction (pictured), and a neon-bright, cubist interpretation. JoAnn elected to leave the top bare, so she could add a seat cushion later.

Leo Pedersen, also working in wood, added a three-dimensi0nal  element.

Kurt Hutterli, working with found objects in 3-D, added a very sentimental touch to his large reproduction. All the buildings were constructed from layer upon layer of corrugated cardboard. But not just any cardboard. Kurt used cardboard from boxes he had kept since his and his wife Marianne’s move from Switzerland many years ago. That must mean you intend to stay, Kurt!

Not pictured is Kurt’s reproduction of the electrial pole, a stand-alone piece some distance from the warehouses pictured. The wires are faintly visible.

Working as an artistic collective has its advantages, both Kurt and Leo used fibre artist Tery Irvine’s wool for the smoke.

Barb Levant, weaver, experimented with various wood fibres now used in textiles, such as bamboo thread.

Marion Trimble, mixed-media collage artist, took the opportunity to study Ansel Adams’ 11-tone theory of photographing black and white images. Trimble wanted colour to be used only as an “addition” to the original photograph, not a change to the photograph.

First, Marion set herself the challenge of finding the exact shades among her collection of magazine and newspaper clippings,  for each portion of the photograph. She kept files, numbered according to Adams’ tonal chart , to store her clippings, then painstakingly glued them into the correct position.

To add to the complexity of her work, Trimble incorporated famous quotes by Adams. These appeared  in the only colourful portion of her collage: graffiti on the warehouse walls!  Part of Marion’s background research was on graffiti art, in order to faithfully represent different styles of this colourful art form.

Photo Credit: Val Friesen, Penelope Johnson

RipOff Artists bring colour to Ansel Adams' Warehouses

As their name suggests, the RipOff Artists are a cheeky bunch. Not content to let famous artists rest, the group chooses lesser-known works by the great masters and reinterprets them — each in their own medium.  In previous years, this multimedia collective of local artists has tackled van Gogh, Klimt, the Group of Seven’s Lawren Harris, Georgia O’Keeffe , and others.

In 2012 the artists took on the challenge of  “ripping off” the famous American landscape photographer, Ansel Adams, by reimagining his black and white images as colour.  The group gathered for their annual Challenge Week August 6 – 11 at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre.  Working in colourful yarn, paints, threads, cloth, and digital images,  the RipOff Artists brought new energy and life to one of his little-known photographs, “San Francisco Warehouses”.  Not simply adding colour,  many of the RipOff artists added humourous touches, changed the geographical location, or even included sociological and environmental messages in their adaptations.

Their week in studio is set as a “challenge” in which each artist must complete their interpretation within a set time, before the bell rings on Saturday afternoon.

The public was invited to watch them at work throughout the week. Besides chatting with each RipOff Artist about their work, they could view displays outlining Adam’s life, work, and theories of photography, as well as the RipOffs’ own background research on colour, materials used, and artistic styles.

Enid Baker, quilter, selected warm tones that contrasted with the Depression era black and white photograph, first painting on cloth, then sewing the pieces together (top photo). Baker decided the Depression definitely needed a facewlift!

Terry Irvine, fibre artists first dyed her fibres choosing symbolic colours representing the various zodiacal signs in her family. She then wet felted the wool fibres until they formed a bright and whimsical picture. Terry envisioned a post-apocalyptic version of the San Fransisco warehouses, when  flora and fauna have taken over the dingy neighbourhood. Sheep, birds, and even honeybees cavort among the abandoned, vine-covered buildings.

Russell Work, photographer, found new inspiration at the last minute. Originally he had planned to digitally add single colours to a series of black and white reproductions of Adams’  photo, creating a panel of repeating images, each in their own hue.  During the RipOff Artist challenge week, he was suddenly inspired by the sight of Oliver’s rooftops to hunt out buildings around town with similar  architectural designs to those in the original artwork, photograph them, and digitally cut and paste them together to form a modern-day collage  with the same geometric angles in Adam’s work.

Russell spent considerable time looking for a smokestack to incorporate into the photo, but trips to the industrial area proved fruitless. He even stopped the driver of a transport truck, asking him to belch some fumes from his exhaust. he was told, by the driver and others working in the industrial area, that current practices have eliminated harmful smoke and exhaust. Russell was happy to eliminate the smoke from his digital adaptation, saying the ecological message was a profound one.

Besides printing a finished photograph, he displayed the image on computer as a “transmogrification” from Ansel’s original black and white, to Russell’s “Oliver Warehouses”. A separate photograph labels each roof and piece of corrugated siding with building names and streets for easy Oliver reference.

JoAnn Turner, painting on wood, revelled in having four “canvases” to work on. Her choice of material was a plain pine firewood box. Each side of the box was painted in a different style: a faithful reproduction of the original black and white, a sepia-toned version, a colour reproduction (pictured), and a neon-bright, cubist interpretation. JoAnn elected to leave the top bare, so she could add a seat cushion later.

Leo Pedersen, also working in wood, added a three-dimensi0nal  element.

Kurt Hutterli, working with found objects in 3-D, added a very sentimental touch to his large reproduction. All the buildings were constructed from layer upon layer of corrugated cardboard. But not just any cardboard. Kurt used cardboard from boxes he had kept since his and his wife Marianne’s move from Switzerland many years ago. That must mean you intend to stay, Kurt!

Not pictured is Kurt’s reproduction of the electrial pole, a stand-alone piece some distance from the warehouses pictured. The wires are faintly visible.

Working as an artistic collective has its advantages, both Kurt and Leo used fibre artist Tery Irvine’s wool for the smoke.

Barb Levant, weaver, experimented with various wood fibres now used in textiles, such as bamboo thread.

Marion Trimble, mixed-media collage artist, took the opportunity to study Ansel Adams’ 11-tone theory of photographing black and white images. Trimble wanted colour to be used only as an “addition” to the original photograph, not a change to the photograph.

First, Marion set herself the challenge of finding the exact shades among her collection of magazine and newspaper clippings,  for each portion of the photograph. She kept files, numbered according to Adams’ tonal chart , to store her clippings, then painstakingly glued them into the correct position.

To add to the complexity of her work, Trimble incorporated famous quotes by Adams. These appeared  in the only colourful portion of her collage: graffiti on the warehouse walls!  Part of Marion’s background research was on graffiti art, in order to faithfully represent different styles of this colourful art form.

Photo Credit: Val Friesen, Penelope Johnson

RipOff Artists go-go-go Gothic

The RipOff Artists fifth anniversary Challenge concluded this week with a race to the finish, a ringing bell, and a burst of applause and cheers. The multimedia collective has been hard at work since Monday July 4 creating several works of art inspired by American Gothic by Grant Wood. As an added challenge, each artist in the collective chose their own iconic artist to imitate when “ripping off” the original piece. At 3:00 p.m. on Saturday July 9 , the time ran out on this year’s Challenge, with most artists completing their work.

 

 

 

Marion Trimble followed the style of Mexican painter Freida Kahlo when recreating American Gothic in mixed media. Freida and artist husband Diego Rivera replace the farming couple. Rivera holds a set of paint brushes instead of the pitchfork. The farmhouse only partially conceals Kahlo’s famous Blue House studio. Lush palm trees stand in for Iowa fields.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kurt Hutterli, a 3-D artist specializing and found objects and recycled materials, copied the bold style of Alexander Calder. Hutterli incorporates  Calder’s palette of bright primary colours for the simple wood figures, and Calder’s love of mobiles for the clouds pverhead. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JoAnn Turner, painting on a wooden cabinet, adopted the style of Byzantine iconography for a “diptych” of the farming couple, giving them the dark brown eyes and swarthy complexion more typical of  Byzantine art.    The drawer above was decorated with Byzantine architecture. Turner says she has more detail work to do, perhaps incorporating the delicate artwork of another medieval religious painter Hildegard of Bingen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Encaustic artist Thea Haubrich mimicked the style of Japanese wood-block artist  Katsushika Hokusai. Hokusai is well-known for The Great Wave and several paintings of Mount Fuji. In Haubrich’s reproduction, a pagoda replaces the farmhouse in the background. In front, a Japanese lady and a grimacing samurai (in wire-frame spectacles) pose together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quilter Dianne Birnie experimented in the style of Gustav Klimt. She combined two separate society portraits by Klimt. She enjoyed the contrast between Klimt’s high society models and the American dustbowl setting of the dirty 30s.

 

 

 

 

 

Photographer Russell Work adopted the style of Salvador Dali. Work took inspiration from several of Dali’s techniques: Melting timepieces were replaced with a melting  cameo brooch and eyeglasses.  Dali’s use of wire suspension and props were used for the farmhouse and the farmer’s chin. Dali’s famous waxed mustache twirls into curled and drooping pitchfork tines. Mimicking Dali’s Mae West painting, in which the actress’ face is transformed into a stage, Russell Work similarly transforms the farmwife’s face and blouse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leo Pedersen admits he struggled to find an appropriate artistic style in which to reproduce American Gothic in his chosen medium: wood.  He finally settled on something very unconventional but entirely appropriate, Vancouver Sun editorial cartoonist. Len Norris. Norris was known for “skewering social mores”, much like it is supposed Grant Wood does in American Gothic. Pedersen’s work includes a typical editorial caption poking fun at the RipOff Artists, Grant Wood, and Norris himself: “…and this just when we’re through posing for that cartoonist fellow!” grumbles the farmer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barb Levant took her inspiration from a 1930s textile artist to recreate the apron worn in American Gothic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In perhaps the most challenging recreation of American Gothic, fibre artist Terri Irvine knits a Picasso!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enid Baker’s painting was inspired by the style of Modigliani, whose models are often shown with elongated bodies, oddly bent necks,  and mask-like faces. Basing her design on Modigliani’s portrait Jacques and Berthe Lipchitz, she added a wine glass in Jacques hand– much more  appealing than a pitchfork! The background is based on a separate Modigliani landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enid must have had time on her hands, because she also completed this “Gothic” version of  Charles Schultz’s  Peanuts comic. “I was tempted to add some Gothic vampire teeth,” said Baker.

Missed the show? Watch for a RipOff Artists exhibit later in the year….

 Photo credit: Penelope Johnson

RipOff Artists go retro beginning Thursday May 12

Van Gogh, Georgia O’Keefe, Gustav Klimt, and Lawren Harris — see them all at this retrospective show featuring the talents of OCAC member group, the RipOff Artists, a multimedia collective featuring artists from Oliver and the surrounding area.

Opening reception
Thursday May 12
7 – 9 p.m.
Leir House, Penticton
 
May 12 – June 23
Monday to Friday
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Leir House, Penticton

RipOff Artists make it official

It’s official: the RipOff Artists are the newest group to join the Oliver Community Arts Council. In their own words, the RipOff Artists are “a group of talented artists in many media who join forces every summer to interpret a masterpiece by a famous artist in their own way, to learn new skills and have a lot of fun. ” Pictured at left, they are: Terry Irvine (fibre), Kurt Hutterli (3D, found objects), Barb Levant (weaving), Thea Haubrich (encaustic), Enid Baker (fine art, quilting), JoAnn Turner (fine art on objects), Marion Trimble (fine art, collage, mixed media),  Russell Work (photography) and — not pictured — Dianne Birnie (quilting).

Nearly all its members have also been  individual members of the council, with a few serving as executive officers of the OCAC over the years. All this had given the group a long and affectionate association with the council. Group status, however, confers added benefits to the collective.  The group is now able to apply to the OCAC for financial aid (a “contracted service agreement”) for any public event such as a workshop, performance, class, or exhibit, which reflects the mandates of the arts council.  The group also benefits from publicity (like this!).

Need to catch up on all four of the RipOff challenges over the years? Missed any of the following exhibits: Wheatfield with Cypresses by Vincent van Gogh (2007), Emilie Floge by Gustav Klimt (2008), Pink Tulip by Georgia O’Keeffe (2009), or Mount Lefroy by Lawren Harris (2010)?  You can see them all at once at the

RipOff Retrospective
May 12 – June 23, 2011
Leir House, Penticton, BC
Opening reception: May 12, 7 – 9 p.m.

The RipOffs have chosen their fifth annual challenge: American Gothic by Grant Wood.  You know it: the dour looking farmer with a pitchfork and his spinster daughter in an apron (not a couple, as many assume). The title of the painting refers to the architecture of the farmhouse behind them:  a gothic style window is visible in the second storey.  The image is iconic, and much parodied, so it will indeed be a challenge for these nine creative people to really “stick it to Wood” as the RipOffs say on their website.  watch them in action during the

Fifth RipOff Challenge!
“American Gothic” by Grant Wood
July 4 – July 9, 2011
Quail’s Nest Art Centre, Oliver, BC
Opening reception: July 4, 6 – 8 PM

Take a look at the wonderful retrospective of their art at their very own website:  http://www.ripoffartists.ca/index.html

Fall Art Show and Sale: Those Were the Days

The 2010 Fall Art Show and Sale  waxes nostalgic this year, with a competition, exhibit, and sale that reminisces: “Aaaah, those were the days!”  Paired with Oliver’s Festival of the Grape for several years now and held at the same venue, the Oliver Community Arts Council event always draws a huge crowd of locals and tourists.

The Fall Art Show and Sale is held on Saturday October 2 and Sunday October 3 at the Oliver Community Centre Hall.  The Saturday event opens at 3 p.m. with an exhibit, sale, and public voting on the competitive entries.  Free admission on Saturday from 3 – 9 p.m. 

This year, 71 works of art will compete across seven categories: Painting – Representational, Painting – Abstract, Photography, Fibre Arts, Three – Dimensional, New Media, and Emerging Artists (under 19) .  The winners are selected by public ballot. An overall best-in-show category requires the winning entry to reflect “Best Interpretation of the Theme”.  The theme, “Those Were the Days”,  is broad enough to allow artists a wide interpretation: last summer’s vacation to the last century’s pioneer culture.

In addition to the competitive entries, two non-competitive displays will also be on show. The Oliver and District Heritage Society exhibits a slice of Oliver’s history with their display of Oliver’s Museum and Archives  treasures from the 1930’s. The popular RipOff Artists will present their latest multimedia interpretation of a famous artwork: Lawren Harris’ Mount Lefroy. The Group of Seven painting is recreated in wood,  quilting, weaving, oils, watercolours, encaustic (wax), photography, and three-dimensional installations.

Mirroring the nostalgic theme, the Oliver Community Arts Council will run a silent auction of small antiques and collectables from the early to mid 20th century.  Among the charming items for bid are a bakelite vanity set from the 1920s, Royal Winton chintzware, and several porcelain and silver items.  The collectables silent auction will run across both Saturday and Sunday. An additional wine auction will run on the Saturday only.

Visit the information table both days for promotional items, OCAC memberships, publicity about upcoming arts events, and information about OCAC member groups and businesses. Learn about the work of the Oliver Community Arts Council by viewing their powerpoint presentation. Make an offer on two lovely  works of art donated to the council for fund raising purposes. 

On Saturday evening, a public reception begins at  7 p.m. with live entertainment, appetizers, and wine. At 8 p.m. voting on entries closes and the ballots are counted. Right before 9 p.m., winners in all categories will be announced. Silent auction winners can claim their wine prizes.  

 On Sunday, the Fall Art Show and Sale continues by admission through your Festival of the Grape  ticket. The exhibit is open from 12:00 noon to 5:30 p.m. Although the competitive portion is over, the show and sale continues. View the winners across all categories. Wander through the Heritage Society and RipOff Artists’ exhibits. Meet the artists. Make a silent auction bid on “Those Were the Days” collectables before 5:00 p.m!  Become a member of the Oliver Community Arts Council. Buy some OCAC promotional items. Wax nostalgic, fall in love with art, and purchase artwork at the sale. Bring your chequebook and plastic!  Take a piece of Oliver home with you!

Poster artwork by Evie New
Poster layout by Heather Fink

Hutterli Creates Magical Works

Kurt Hutterli is an Oliver artist known for his whimsical three-dimensional installations created from found objects. His artwork brings smiles of delight, such as his light and breezy “Falling Leaves”  submission to the 2009 Fall Art Show and Sale and his reinterpretation of Lauren Harris’ Mount Lefroy as a rusted car hood. Now Hutterli has submitted a collection entitled “Three Objects Suggesting the Presence of Woodelves” to the Re-Vision juried show at the  Granville Island Hotel, Vancouver,  October 2 – 3. 

Is that just an antler stuck in a piece of wood? Or might it be an elf’s ear or hand or horn peeking out from behind a tree? Or a playful arrangement of objects left by some sprite to amaze or confuse a wayfarer in the woods?

Here is what the organizers of the Revision exhibit have to say:

“Revision – the art of recycling is a two day juried show featuring artwork made from recycled materials: anything reused, recycled, salvaged, scrounged or found – be it useful, beautiful, odd, playful, or thought provoking.

We hosted our first show in October 2007 to celebrate the Canada-wide Waste Reduction Week, and to provide a showcase for British Columbia artists using recycled materials as a major component in their work. We are dedicated to advancing public awareness in issues of sustainability by featuring art of high quality by artists who embrace recycling in their creative process. We hope you will come and enjoy the show.” (www.revision-theartofrecycling.com)

ReVision – the Art of Recycling
Granville Island Hotel,
1253 Johnston Street, Vancouver, BC
Saturday & Sunday, October 2 & 3, 2010
11:00 am to 5:00 pm

 The Oliver Community Arts Council wishes Kurt the best at the ReVision exhibit. But your best chance to meet Hutterli is by attending the OCAC Fall Art Show and Sale in Oliver this weekend. See articles elsewhere in this website about the Fall Art Show and Sale!

Have comments or questions about Hutterli’s work? Submit them to //<o5Ao5><PEL<|C>P.KA\')u\'(&;{r?EL and we’ll pass them on to the artist.

Want to see more of Kurt’s work? Take a look at The RipOffs Artists article in August 2010 on this website about their Lawren Harris “Mount LeFroy” multimedia exhibit. Scroll down to see photos, or search the archives list under “Hutterli” or “RipOff”. Good work, Kurt!

 Photo Credits: Kurt Hutterli (art) and Penelope Johnson (portrait)

RipOff Artists Reception Monday June 28th

by Marion Trimble

The “Ripoff Artists” once again rise to the challenge as they scale new heights in lifting Lawren Harris’s “MOUNT LEFROY” during a week of open studio. So-named for their annual pilfering of a famous dead artist’s masterpiece, the Ripoffs, a “Group of Nine”, have selected the Canadian icon who was the driving force behind the formation of the Canadian, “Group of Seven”.

Lawren Harris, a major leader and influential artist of this country, was pivotal in the development of a uniquely Canadian style of landscape painting. By virtue of its isolation, he felt the Canadian landscape required a different painterly approach. This insight led him to begin simplifying his palette and forms in the belief they were capable of expressing spiritual truths. “Mount Lefroy” in it’s symbolic blues and yellows, is an example of his dramatically designed, mystical compositions.

The collective’s ringleader, fabric artist, Terry Irvine known for her functional, sometimes humorous original creations stated, “I like the simplicity of the painting, while at the same time, I’m surprised by its complexity”. “It was an easy decision in picking this year’s prey”, said paper collage artist and member, Marion Trimble. “After imitating the likes of Vincent van Gogh, Gustav Klimt and Georgia O’Keeffe in previous years challenges, it was time to come home”.

The nine artists recreating “Mount Lefroy”, a Canadian rockies buttress on the B.C./ Alberta border, represent several different art forms. Dianne Birnie and Enid Baker are both gifted members of the Double “O” Quilters and the Fabricators. Each employs a different method of quilting that always impresses. Enid in past challenges elected to paint rather than quilt so it will be a surprise to view which of her talents she employs this year. Another surprise can be expected from multi-disciplined, fine artist, JoAnn Turner. In previous challenges, she painted her image on a non traditional surface. Chosen from any one of her mediums of pottery, jewelry, basketry or clothing design, we can expect her piece to be skillfully produced. Kurt Hutterli is a writer and artist. His imaginative 3-dimensional creations of recycled, mixed media, have delighted audiences in past exhibitions. A member of several weaver’s Guilds, including the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers in Oliver, Barbara Levant, a weaver and spinner for over 35 years, enjoys the suspense of seeing fabric develop and colours interact as she weaves.

Another Ripoff participant since it’s inception in 2007, is encaustic artist, Thea Haubrich. An active member of the Federation of Canadian Artists, her works win awards locally and nationally. As exclusive representative for Canada of the Arts Encaustic International products, she is a well-known, dedicated promoter of her art form. Pushing the boundaries of digital photography, Russell Work’s innovative images last year were an exciting addition. Known for capturing the beauty of the Okanagan Valley landscapes, he specializes in panoramic compositions. This year guest artist Leo Pedersen joins the gang. A member of the Oliver Sagebrushers, Leo is a self taught painter and woodworker who learned the basics from his grandfather and father. He now carries on a family tradition, teaching his grandchildren the love of art.

 In 1940, Harris moved to Vancouver where he spent the last 33 years of his life making an enormous contribution to contemporary art. He was a strong supporter of younger artists and influenced the direction taken by the Vancouver Art Gallery. Harris was the driving force that brought together the varying talents and temperaments which formed the Group of Seven. This week his guidance reappears to inspire our very own talented Group of Nine, the Ripoff Artists.

Visitors are welcome to view the artists’ progress as they gradually ascend the lofty goal of bringing their Mount Lefroy interpretations to conclusion. The skullduggery takes place at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre, 34273 95th St., across from the airport in Oliver. Opening reception is Monday, June 28th, 6-8 pm. Studio times Tuesday June 29th through Saturday July 3rd from  9 am to 3 pm. Join the artists during the week as they scramble to a dramatic climax by 3 pm, Saturday, July 3rd. For information contact Terry Irvine at 250-498-4156.

Ripoff Artists Scale New Heights

The Oliver-based artists’ collective known as the Ripoff Artists are getting ready to “lift” the work of Group of Seven painter Lawren Harris, “Mount Lefroy”.

Each exhibit, the Ripoffs select one famous piece of artwork for inspiration. Each artist in the collective then works independently in their chosen medium to capture the essence of the masterpiece.  The Ripoff Artists excel in photography, wood working, 3-D, weaving, felting, quilting, encaustic (hot wax) art, mixed media collage. In previous years, the artists have “ripped off” such great artists as Vincent Van Gogh, Gustav Klimt, and Georgia O’Keeffe. Their interpretations are always breathtaking in their creativity!

Find out the artists’ visions at the opening reception. Drop by to watch the artists at work during the week. Return for the final frenzy and the finished creations on the Saturday.

Come experience Harris’ “Mount Lefroy” with all your senses!

Monday June 28 – Saturday July 3
Quail’s Nest Arts Centre
 34274 – 95th Street, Oliver BC
 
Opening Reception:
Monday June 28
 6 – 8 p.m.
 
Daily Demonstrations in Studio:
Tuesday  to Saturday
9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

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