Screaming success

ripoffs 2016Here is a photo of the RipOff artists with their creations just after the bell rang on Saturday signalling the end of this year’s challenge.

Although the iconic painting, “The Scream” by Edvard Munch is considered a depressing picture, the RipOffs did their best to liven it up.   Each of the nine artists added an element from the previous nine years challenges: perhaps a dancing girl from Toulouse Lautrec, a cypress by Vincent van Gogh, or a tulip by Geoorgia O’Keeffe. In addition, the current challenge was to add an anachronism – often a reason for the “scream”. For example, a number of artists chose some form of industrialization or climate change in the background as their anachronism. Guest artist, Bethany Handfield with her encaustic talent was a delightful addition.

To celebrate the group’s 10th anniversary, a grand opening reception was held in “big blue”.  Guests were surrounded by previous year’s RipOff challenge pieces.  Shown together the impressive display gave kudos to the merits of the RipOff’s artistic achievements.

The artists wish to thank the Oliver Community Arts Council  for their support in mounting this year’s special anniversary challenge.

Who knows what the group will conjure up for next year.  Perhaps something acknowledging Canada’s 150th birthday….any suggestions?

Rockies documentary features Oliver artwork

Flyer Documentary, 2013, 3

The artwork of Oliver painter – and Swiss native —  Kurt Hutterli will be featured on the cover of a new DVD release, “Swiss Guides in the Canadian Rockies: Beyond Adventure”, a documentary produced by the Consulate General of Switzerland in Vancouver as part of the Swiss 100 Canada project. This year, Swiss 100 Canada celebrates 100 years of official relations between Switzerland and Western Canada.  The documentary, directed by  Josias Tschanz,  features interviews with mountaineering experts against a backdrop of stunning Canadian alpine scenery as they reflect on the impact Swiss mountaineers had on opening up the backcountry of the Canadian Rockies.

Swiss alpine guides had accompanied English mountaineers in the Rockies during the 1800s, but it wasn’t until a fatal climbing accident on Mount Lefroy in 1896 that the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) hotels hired Swiss guides to work for the mountain parks. Between 1899 and 1954 Swiss alpinists led hundreds of first ascents and taught safe climbing techniques to thousands of climbers. They also laid some of the most beautiful mountain trails, most notably the stone pathways in the Lake O’Hara region of Yoho National Park. Arguably, their skills training, and enthusiasm, helped to create the current cultural appreciation of the Canadian Rockies, together with a desire to preserve this remarkable landscape.

Kurt Hutterli

Kurt Hutterli (pictured at left) explains how he was personally contacted to help with this Swiss 100 Canada project:

“A while ago I got a phone call from the Consul General of Switzerland in Vancouver, Urs Strausak. He told me about the projects planned for the Centennial Celebrations of the diplomatic relations between Switzerland and British  Columbia. One of the projects was a documentary about the Swiss guides in the Canadian Rockies by director Josias Tschanz (Counting Ants Productions) and produced by the Swiss government through the Consulate General of Switzerland in Vancouver. Urs Strausak asked me for ideas for the cover of the DVD. I sent him a copy of my RipOff Artists painting from 2010. All the people involved in the production of the movie liked it and it was decided to use the painting also for the flyers and the posters.”

Feuz on Saddleback Mt

Hutterli’s painting (above at top) was originally created as part of the 2010 challenge by Oliver’s RipOff Artists to recreate the iconic work by Group of Seven artist Lawren Harris, “Mount Lefroy”. Kurt’s contribution to the multimedia event was a whimisical interpretation that blended two famous works: Harris’ Mount Lefroy painting (below), and a black and white photograph of Swiss alpinist Eduard Feuz Jr  guiding an unidentified visitor up Saddleback Mountain in the Lake Louise region near Mount Lefroy (at left).

Lawren-Harris-Mount-Lefroy-500x500

Hutterli’s work often blends reality and fantasy. True to form, Kurt let his
imagination run wild in naming the “unidentified visitor” clutching Feuz’s hand in the photograph. He titled his piece “Ed Feuz Jr Guiding Emily Carr at Mount Lefroy”, giving a teasing doff of the cap to another BC artist! Hutterli delights in blurring the lines between legend and history in his art, whether working in oils or three-dimensional installations. Hutterli further describes this particular piece as “a contribution to BC mythology”.

The trailer for “Swiss Guides in the Canadian Rockies: Beyond Adventure” can be viewed here:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=00ndBrrgCmw

More about Swiss100Canada is here: www.Swiss100Canada.com 

The premiere screening of the documentary is on Sunday June 23 at 5:30 at the Banff Centre, Margaret Greenham Theatre. No word yet on the release of the DVD to the public, but Kurt will keep you posted!

Friday June 21: Due to the heavy rain and flooding, and out of respect for those affected in Southern Alberta, the Consulate General of Switzerland in Vancouver has cancelled the Premiere Screening that was to be held in Banff this Sunday, June 23rd, 2013. The documentary Swiss Guides in the Canadian Rockies – Beyond Adventure will be screened at a later to be determined date.

Logo CH-CA-LikeMinded_RBW

RipOff Artists bring colour to Ansel Adams’ Warehouses

As their name suggests, the RipOff Artists are a cheeky bunch. Not content to let famous artists rest, the group chooses lesser-known works by the great masters and reinterprets them — each in their own medium.  In previous years, this multimedia collective of local artists has tackled van Gogh, Klimt, the Group of Seven’s Lawren Harris, Georgia O’Keeffe , and others.

In 2012 the artists took on the challenge of  “ripping off” the famous American landscape photographer, Ansel Adams, by reimagining his black and white images as colour.  The group gathered for their annual Challenge Week August 6 – 11 at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre.  Working in colourful yarn, paints, threads, cloth, and digital images,  the RipOff Artists brought new energy and life to one of his little-known photographs, “San Francisco Warehouses”.  Not simply adding colour,  many of the RipOff artists added humourous touches, changed the geographical location, or even included sociological and environmental messages in their adaptations.

Their week in studio is set as a “challenge” in which each artist must complete their interpretation within a set time, before the bell rings on Saturday afternoon.

The public was invited to watch them at work throughout the week. Besides chatting with each RipOff Artist about their work, they could view displays outlining Adam’s life, work, and theories of photography, as well as the RipOffs’ own background research on colour, materials used, and artistic styles.

Enid Baker, quilter, selected warm tones that contrasted with the Depression era black and white photograph, first painting on cloth, then sewing the pieces together (top photo). Baker decided the Depression definitely needed a facewlift!

Terry Irvine, fibre artists first dyed her fibres choosing symbolic colours representing the various zodiacal signs in her family. She then wet felted the wool fibres until they formed a bright and whimsical picture. Terry envisioned a post-apocalyptic version of the San Fransisco warehouses, when  flora and fauna have taken over the dingy neighbourhood. Sheep, birds, and even honeybees cavort among the abandoned, vine-covered buildings.

Russell Work, photographer, found new inspiration at the last minute. Originally he had planned to digitally add single colours to a series of black and white reproductions of Adams’  photo, creating a panel of repeating images, each in their own hue.  During the RipOff Artist challenge week, he was suddenly inspired by the sight of Oliver’s rooftops to hunt out buildings around town with similar  architectural designs to those in the original artwork, photograph them, and digitally cut and paste them together to form a modern-day collage  with the same geometric angles in Adam’s work.

Russell spent considerable time looking for a smokestack to incorporate into the photo, but trips to the industrial area proved fruitless. He even stopped the driver of a transport truck, asking him to belch some fumes from his exhaust. he was told, by the driver and others working in the industrial area, that current practices have eliminated harmful smoke and exhaust. Russell was happy to eliminate the smoke from his digital adaptation, saying the ecological message was a profound one.

Besides printing a finished photograph, he displayed the image on computer as a “transmogrification” from Ansel’s original black and white, to Russell’s “Oliver Warehouses”. A separate photograph labels each roof and piece of corrugated siding with building names and streets for easy Oliver reference.

JoAnn Turner, painting on wood, revelled in having four “canvases” to work on. Her choice of material was a plain pine firewood box. Each side of the box was painted in a different style: a faithful reproduction of the original black and white, a sepia-toned version, a colour reproduction (pictured), and a neon-bright, cubist interpretation. JoAnn elected to leave the top bare, so she could add a seat cushion later.

Leo Pedersen, also working in wood, added a three-dimensi0nal  element.

Kurt Hutterli, working with found objects in 3-D, added a very sentimental touch to his large reproduction. All the buildings were constructed from layer upon layer of corrugated cardboard. But not just any cardboard. Kurt used cardboard from boxes he had kept since his and his wife Marianne’s move from Switzerland many years ago. That must mean you intend to stay, Kurt!

Not pictured is Kurt’s reproduction of the electrial pole, a stand-alone piece some distance from the warehouses pictured. The wires are faintly visible.

Working as an artistic collective has its advantages, both Kurt and Leo used fibre artist Tery Irvine’s wool for the smoke.

Barb Levant, weaver, experimented with various wood fibres now used in textiles, such as bamboo thread.

Marion Trimble, mixed-media collage artist, took the opportunity to study Ansel Adams’ 11-tone theory of photographing black and white images. Trimble wanted colour to be used only as an “addition” to the original photograph, not a change to the photograph.

First, Marion set herself the challenge of finding the exact shades among her collection of magazine and newspaper clippings,  for each portion of the photograph. She kept files, numbered according to Adams’ tonal chart , to store her clippings, then painstakingly glued them into the correct position.

To add to the complexity of her work, Trimble incorporated famous quotes by Adams. These appeared  in the only colourful portion of her collage: graffiti on the warehouse walls!  Part of Marion’s background research was on graffiti art, in order to faithfully represent different styles of this colourful art form.

Photo Credit: Val Friesen, Penelope Johnson

RipOff Artists bring colour to Ansel Adams' Warehouses

As their name suggests, the RipOff Artists are a cheeky bunch. Not content to let famous artists rest, the group chooses lesser-known works by the great masters and reinterprets them — each in their own medium.  In previous years, this multimedia collective of local artists has tackled van Gogh, Klimt, the Group of Seven’s Lawren Harris, Georgia O’Keeffe , and others.

In 2012 the artists took on the challenge of  “ripping off” the famous American landscape photographer, Ansel Adams, by reimagining his black and white images as colour.  The group gathered for their annual Challenge Week August 6 – 11 at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre.  Working in colourful yarn, paints, threads, cloth, and digital images,  the RipOff Artists brought new energy and life to one of his little-known photographs, “San Francisco Warehouses”.  Not simply adding colour,  many of the RipOff artists added humourous touches, changed the geographical location, or even included sociological and environmental messages in their adaptations.

Their week in studio is set as a “challenge” in which each artist must complete their interpretation within a set time, before the bell rings on Saturday afternoon.

The public was invited to watch them at work throughout the week. Besides chatting with each RipOff Artist about their work, they could view displays outlining Adam’s life, work, and theories of photography, as well as the RipOffs’ own background research on colour, materials used, and artistic styles.

Enid Baker, quilter, selected warm tones that contrasted with the Depression era black and white photograph, first painting on cloth, then sewing the pieces together (top photo). Baker decided the Depression definitely needed a facewlift!

Terry Irvine, fibre artists first dyed her fibres choosing symbolic colours representing the various zodiacal signs in her family. She then wet felted the wool fibres until they formed a bright and whimsical picture. Terry envisioned a post-apocalyptic version of the San Fransisco warehouses, when  flora and fauna have taken over the dingy neighbourhood. Sheep, birds, and even honeybees cavort among the abandoned, vine-covered buildings.

Russell Work, photographer, found new inspiration at the last minute. Originally he had planned to digitally add single colours to a series of black and white reproductions of Adams’  photo, creating a panel of repeating images, each in their own hue.  During the RipOff Artist challenge week, he was suddenly inspired by the sight of Oliver’s rooftops to hunt out buildings around town with similar  architectural designs to those in the original artwork, photograph them, and digitally cut and paste them together to form a modern-day collage  with the same geometric angles in Adam’s work.

Russell spent considerable time looking for a smokestack to incorporate into the photo, but trips to the industrial area proved fruitless. He even stopped the driver of a transport truck, asking him to belch some fumes from his exhaust. he was told, by the driver and others working in the industrial area, that current practices have eliminated harmful smoke and exhaust. Russell was happy to eliminate the smoke from his digital adaptation, saying the ecological message was a profound one.

Besides printing a finished photograph, he displayed the image on computer as a “transmogrification” from Ansel’s original black and white, to Russell’s “Oliver Warehouses”. A separate photograph labels each roof and piece of corrugated siding with building names and streets for easy Oliver reference.

JoAnn Turner, painting on wood, revelled in having four “canvases” to work on. Her choice of material was a plain pine firewood box. Each side of the box was painted in a different style: a faithful reproduction of the original black and white, a sepia-toned version, a colour reproduction (pictured), and a neon-bright, cubist interpretation. JoAnn elected to leave the top bare, so she could add a seat cushion later.

Leo Pedersen, also working in wood, added a three-dimensi0nal  element.

Kurt Hutterli, working with found objects in 3-D, added a very sentimental touch to his large reproduction. All the buildings were constructed from layer upon layer of corrugated cardboard. But not just any cardboard. Kurt used cardboard from boxes he had kept since his and his wife Marianne’s move from Switzerland many years ago. That must mean you intend to stay, Kurt!

Not pictured is Kurt’s reproduction of the electrial pole, a stand-alone piece some distance from the warehouses pictured. The wires are faintly visible.

Working as an artistic collective has its advantages, both Kurt and Leo used fibre artist Tery Irvine’s wool for the smoke.

Barb Levant, weaver, experimented with various wood fibres now used in textiles, such as bamboo thread.

Marion Trimble, mixed-media collage artist, took the opportunity to study Ansel Adams’ 11-tone theory of photographing black and white images. Trimble wanted colour to be used only as an “addition” to the original photograph, not a change to the photograph.

First, Marion set herself the challenge of finding the exact shades among her collection of magazine and newspaper clippings,  for each portion of the photograph. She kept files, numbered according to Adams’ tonal chart , to store her clippings, then painstakingly glued them into the correct position.

To add to the complexity of her work, Trimble incorporated famous quotes by Adams. These appeared  in the only colourful portion of her collage: graffiti on the warehouse walls!  Part of Marion’s background research was on graffiti art, in order to faithfully represent different styles of this colourful art form.

Photo Credit: Val Friesen, Penelope Johnson

RipOff Artists go-go-go Gothic

The RipOff Artists fifth anniversary Challenge concluded this week with a race to the finish, a ringing bell, and a burst of applause and cheers. The multimedia collective has been hard at work since Monday July 4 creating several works of art inspired by American Gothic by Grant Wood. As an added challenge, each artist in the collective chose their own iconic artist to imitate when “ripping off” the original piece. At 3:00 p.m. on Saturday July 9 , the time ran out on this year’s Challenge, with most artists completing their work.

 

 

 

Marion Trimble followed the style of Mexican painter Freida Kahlo when recreating American Gothic in mixed media. Freida and artist husband Diego Rivera replace the farming couple. Rivera holds a set of paint brushes instead of the pitchfork. The farmhouse only partially conceals Kahlo’s famous Blue House studio. Lush palm trees stand in for Iowa fields.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kurt Hutterli, a 3-D artist specializing and found objects and recycled materials, copied the bold style of Alexander Calder. Hutterli incorporates  Calder’s palette of bright primary colours for the simple wood figures, and Calder’s love of mobiles for the clouds pverhead. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JoAnn Turner, painting on a wooden cabinet, adopted the style of Byzantine iconography for a “diptych” of the farming couple, giving them the dark brown eyes and swarthy complexion more typical of  Byzantine art.    The drawer above was decorated with Byzantine architecture. Turner says she has more detail work to do, perhaps incorporating the delicate artwork of another medieval religious painter Hildegard of Bingen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Encaustic artist Thea Haubrich mimicked the style of Japanese wood-block artist  Katsushika Hokusai. Hokusai is well-known for The Great Wave and several paintings of Mount Fuji. In Haubrich’s reproduction, a pagoda replaces the farmhouse in the background. In front, a Japanese lady and a grimacing samurai (in wire-frame spectacles) pose together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quilter Dianne Birnie experimented in the style of Gustav Klimt. She combined two separate society portraits by Klimt. She enjoyed the contrast between Klimt’s high society models and the American dustbowl setting of the dirty 30s.

 

 

 

 

 

Photographer Russell Work adopted the style of Salvador Dali. Work took inspiration from several of Dali’s techniques: Melting timepieces were replaced with a melting  cameo brooch and eyeglasses.  Dali’s use of wire suspension and props were used for the farmhouse and the farmer’s chin. Dali’s famous waxed mustache twirls into curled and drooping pitchfork tines. Mimicking Dali’s Mae West painting, in which the actress’ face is transformed into a stage, Russell Work similarly transforms the farmwife’s face and blouse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leo Pedersen admits he struggled to find an appropriate artistic style in which to reproduce American Gothic in his chosen medium: wood.  He finally settled on something very unconventional but entirely appropriate, Vancouver Sun editorial cartoonist. Len Norris. Norris was known for “skewering social mores”, much like it is supposed Grant Wood does in American Gothic. Pedersen’s work includes a typical editorial caption poking fun at the RipOff Artists, Grant Wood, and Norris himself: “…and this just when we’re through posing for that cartoonist fellow!” grumbles the farmer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barb Levant took her inspiration from a 1930s textile artist to recreate the apron worn in American Gothic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In perhaps the most challenging recreation of American Gothic, fibre artist Terri Irvine knits a Picasso!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enid Baker’s painting was inspired by the style of Modigliani, whose models are often shown with elongated bodies, oddly bent necks,  and mask-like faces. Basing her design on Modigliani’s portrait Jacques and Berthe Lipchitz, she added a wine glass in Jacques hand– much more  appealing than a pitchfork! The background is based on a separate Modigliani landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enid must have had time on her hands, because she also completed this “Gothic” version of  Charles Schultz’s  Peanuts comic. “I was tempted to add some Gothic vampire teeth,” said Baker.

Missed the show? Watch for a RipOff Artists exhibit later in the year….

 Photo credit: Penelope Johnson

Kurt Hutterli has a REvision

Oliver’s Kurt Hutterli, a 3-D artist specializing in found objects or recycled art, has had three pieces accepted into a juried art show titled “ReVision: The Art of Recycling” at Granville Island’s Creekhouse Gallery in Vancouver this July 8 – 17.

Hutterli is well-known among local artists for his whimsical works, whether as a solo artist or as a member of the collective RipOff Artists, who have their own studio demonstration and exhibit in Oliver this July.  Kurt recrafts rusted metal scraps, broken tools, and appliance parts into mythical archaeological artefacts. His designs are often deceptively simple, leaving much room for interpretation.  Using a question mark after many of his artwork titles, Hutterli invites viewers to decide for themselves what purpose a mysterious “artefact” once served.

At left is “Royal Insignia?”. Below is “A Twin Soul Catcher?”. At the bottom is “A Cosmic Sensor?” All three are entered into the Granville Island exhibit, competition, and sale.

Revision – the Art of Recycling held its first show in October 2007 to celebrate Canada-wide Waste Reduction Week and to provide a showcase for artists using recycled materials as a major component of their work. The Society continues to dedicate itself to advancing public awareness in issues of sustainability by featuring art of high quality by artists who embrace recycling in their creative process.

Revision at Creekhouse is a 10 day juried exhibit, sale, and festival featuring art made from recycled, salvaged, scrounged or found materials, be it useful, beautiful, odd, playful, or thought provoking. On the final two days of the show (July 16-17) additional artwork will be on view as well as a creation station and an interactive sound station by SWARM member Bill Wallace. On July 17th a wearable art fashion parade is scheduled for the afternoon.

Check out the ReVision website here:  Revision: What is Recycled Art and here:  ReVision Gallery

The Creekhouse complex is a popular, high profile venue that will be showcasing many large and small scale works in both an indoor and outdoor setting. During the month of July visitors to Granville Island are estimated to be 35,000 per day.

Can’t get to Vancouver? Prefer the sunny, relaxing Okanagan? See Kurt at work on the RipOff Artists’ “American Gothic” Challenge, July 4 – 9 at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre, 34274 – 95th St,. Oliver, BC. Scroll down for full details!

RipOff Artists go retro beginning Thursday May 12

Van Gogh, Georgia O’Keefe, Gustav Klimt, and Lawren Harris — see them all at this retrospective show featuring the talents of OCAC member group, the RipOff Artists, a multimedia collective featuring artists from Oliver and the surrounding area.

Opening reception
Thursday May 12
7 – 9 p.m.
Leir House, Penticton
 
May 12 – June 23
Monday to Friday
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Leir House, Penticton

RipOff Artists Retrospective Opening May 12

The RipOff Artists are a multimedia collective who set themselves a new challenge each year to “rip off” a famous work of art, reproducing it in their own medium. Photography, fibre art (weaving, felting, and quilting), painting, 3-D, found objects, encaustic (hot wax painting), and more!   2011 is their fifth anniversary, and in celebration they are mounting  a retrospective of their previous work.

Do you need to catch up on any of the four RipOff challenges over the years? Missed any of the following exhibits: Wheatfield with Cypresses by Vincent van Gogh (2007), Emilie Floge by Gustav Klimt (2008), Pink Tulip by Georgia O’Keeffe (2009), or Mount Lefroy by Lawren Harris (2010)?

Here’s a taste of their work. At left is Klimt’s Emilie Floge interpreted in mixed-media collage by Marion Trimble. Below is Harris’ Mount Lefroy reimagined as a small painted cabinet by JoAnn Turner.

You can see them all at once at the

RipOff Retrospective
May 12 – June 23, 2011
Opening reception: May 12, 7 – 9 p.m.
Leir House, 220 Manor Park Avenue, Penticton BC, V2A 2R2
Phone: (250) 492-7997  

 

RipOff Artists make it official

It’s official: the RipOff Artists are the newest group to join the Oliver Community Arts Council. In their own words, the RipOff Artists are “a group of talented artists in many media who join forces every summer to interpret a masterpiece by a famous artist in their own way, to learn new skills and have a lot of fun. ” Pictured at left, they are: Terry Irvine (fibre), Kurt Hutterli (3D, found objects), Barb Levant (weaving), Thea Haubrich (encaustic), Enid Baker (fine art, quilting), JoAnn Turner (fine art on objects), Marion Trimble (fine art, collage, mixed media),  Russell Work (photography) and — not pictured — Dianne Birnie (quilting).

Nearly all its members have also been  individual members of the council, with a few serving as executive officers of the OCAC over the years. All this had given the group a long and affectionate association with the council. Group status, however, confers added benefits to the collective.  The group is now able to apply to the OCAC for financial aid (a “contracted service agreement”) for any public event such as a workshop, performance, class, or exhibit, which reflects the mandates of the arts council.  The group also benefits from publicity (like this!).

Need to catch up on all four of the RipOff challenges over the years? Missed any of the following exhibits: Wheatfield with Cypresses by Vincent van Gogh (2007), Emilie Floge by Gustav Klimt (2008), Pink Tulip by Georgia O’Keeffe (2009), or Mount Lefroy by Lawren Harris (2010)?  You can see them all at once at the

RipOff Retrospective
May 12 – June 23, 2011
Leir House, Penticton, BC
Opening reception: May 12, 7 – 9 p.m.

The RipOffs have chosen their fifth annual challenge: American Gothic by Grant Wood.  You know it: the dour looking farmer with a pitchfork and his spinster daughter in an apron (not a couple, as many assume). The title of the painting refers to the architecture of the farmhouse behind them:  a gothic style window is visible in the second storey.  The image is iconic, and much parodied, so it will indeed be a challenge for these nine creative people to really “stick it to Wood” as the RipOffs say on their website.  watch them in action during the

Fifth RipOff Challenge!
“American Gothic” by Grant Wood
July 4 – July 9, 2011
Quail’s Nest Art Centre, Oliver, BC
Opening reception: July 4, 6 – 8 PM

Take a look at the wonderful retrospective of their art at their very own website:  http://www.ripoffartists.ca/index.html

RipOff Artists’ Mount Lefroy at Handworks Gallery

The multimedia collective has conquered another peak with their interpretation of Lawren Harris’ “Mount Lefroy”.  The RipOff Artists reached their first summit after a week of intense creation, demonstration and exhibit during  Summer at the Quail’s Nest. They reached another pinnacle with a feature on CHBC TV news.  They attracted attention during their guest exhibit at the Oliver Community Arts Council’s Fall Art Show and Sale on the weekend of October 2 -3 . Now the RipOff Artists have set their flag  atop Handworks Gallery for their latest show:

Handworks Gallery presents
The RipOff Artists: Lawren Harris’ Mount LeFroy
Opening Reception
Wednesday October 6
2 – 4 p.m.
Refreshments ~ Door Prize
Continuing:
October 5 – 29
9:30 – 5:00 Monday to Friday
10:00 – 4:00 Saturday
Handworks Gallery
35648 – 97 St. Oliver
250-498-6388

Oil painting, watercolours, photography, woodwork, 3-D, quilting, weaving, knitting, collage, encaustic (wax) — all media interpret this Group of Seven classic in their own way.

For more photographs and stories about the Mount Lefroy exhibit, see the July article on this website: http://oliverartscouncil.org/?p=1763

For a fantastic video of the RipOff Artists with Mike Roberts of CHBC, take a look at http://www.chbcnews.ca/video/index.html?releasePID=f5794obragGwCKDQACQpmpfwc7SlVcJm

RipOff Artists' Mount Lefroy at Handworks Gallery

The multimedia collective has conquered another peak with their interpretation of Lawren Harris’ “Mount Lefroy”.  The RipOff Artists reached their first summit after a week of intense creation, demonstration and exhibit during  Summer at the Quail’s Nest. They reached another pinnacle with a feature on CHBC TV news.  They attracted attention during their guest exhibit at the Oliver Community Arts Council’s Fall Art Show and Sale on the weekend of October 2 -3 . Now the RipOff Artists have set their flag  atop Handworks Gallery for their latest show:

Handworks Gallery presents
The RipOff Artists: Lawren Harris’ Mount LeFroy
Opening Reception
Wednesday October 6
2 – 4 p.m.
Refreshments ~ Door Prize
Continuing:
October 5 – 29
9:30 – 5:00 Monday to Friday
10:00 – 4:00 Saturday
Handworks Gallery
35648 – 97 St. Oliver
250-498-6388

Oil painting, watercolours, photography, woodwork, 3-D, quilting, weaving, knitting, collage, encaustic (wax) — all media interpret this Group of Seven classic in their own way.

For more photographs and stories about the Mount Lefroy exhibit, see the July article on this website: http://oliverartscouncil.org/?p=1763

For a fantastic video of the RipOff Artists with Mike Roberts of CHBC, take a look at http://www.chbcnews.ca/video/index.html?releasePID=f5794obragGwCKDQACQpmpfwc7SlVcJm

Fall Art Show and Sale: Those Were the Days

The 2010 Fall Art Show and Sale  waxes nostalgic this year, with a competition, exhibit, and sale that reminisces: “Aaaah, those were the days!”  Paired with Oliver’s Festival of the Grape for several years now and held at the same venue, the Oliver Community Arts Council event always draws a huge crowd of locals and tourists.

The Fall Art Show and Sale is held on Saturday October 2 and Sunday October 3 at the Oliver Community Centre Hall.  The Saturday event opens at 3 p.m. with an exhibit, sale, and public voting on the competitive entries.  Free admission on Saturday from 3 – 9 p.m. 

This year, 71 works of art will compete across seven categories: Painting – Representational, Painting – Abstract, Photography, Fibre Arts, Three – Dimensional, New Media, and Emerging Artists (under 19) .  The winners are selected by public ballot. An overall best-in-show category requires the winning entry to reflect “Best Interpretation of the Theme”.  The theme, “Those Were the Days”,  is broad enough to allow artists a wide interpretation: last summer’s vacation to the last century’s pioneer culture.

In addition to the competitive entries, two non-competitive displays will also be on show. The Oliver and District Heritage Society exhibits a slice of Oliver’s history with their display of Oliver’s Museum and Archives  treasures from the 1930’s. The popular RipOff Artists will present their latest multimedia interpretation of a famous artwork: Lawren Harris’ Mount Lefroy. The Group of Seven painting is recreated in wood,  quilting, weaving, oils, watercolours, encaustic (wax), photography, and three-dimensional installations.

Mirroring the nostalgic theme, the Oliver Community Arts Council will run a silent auction of small antiques and collectables from the early to mid 20th century.  Among the charming items for bid are a bakelite vanity set from the 1920s, Royal Winton chintzware, and several porcelain and silver items.  The collectables silent auction will run across both Saturday and Sunday. An additional wine auction will run on the Saturday only.

Visit the information table both days for promotional items, OCAC memberships, publicity about upcoming arts events, and information about OCAC member groups and businesses. Learn about the work of the Oliver Community Arts Council by viewing their powerpoint presentation. Make an offer on two lovely  works of art donated to the council for fund raising purposes. 

On Saturday evening, a public reception begins at  7 p.m. with live entertainment, appetizers, and wine. At 8 p.m. voting on entries closes and the ballots are counted. Right before 9 p.m., winners in all categories will be announced. Silent auction winners can claim their wine prizes.  

 On Sunday, the Fall Art Show and Sale continues by admission through your Festival of the Grape  ticket. The exhibit is open from 12:00 noon to 5:30 p.m. Although the competitive portion is over, the show and sale continues. View the winners across all categories. Wander through the Heritage Society and RipOff Artists’ exhibits. Meet the artists. Make a silent auction bid on “Those Were the Days” collectables before 5:00 p.m!  Become a member of the Oliver Community Arts Council. Buy some OCAC promotional items. Wax nostalgic, fall in love with art, and purchase artwork at the sale. Bring your chequebook and plastic!  Take a piece of Oliver home with you!

Poster artwork by Evie New
Poster layout by Heather Fink

RipOff Artists Reach the Peak with Mount Lefroy

During the last week of June, the South Okanagan’s  RipOff Artists attracted media coverage and crowds of curious onlookers with their fourth annual exhibit, “ripping off” Group of Seven’s Lawren Harris and his iconic Mount Lefroy. During a weeklong demonstration and exhibit, each of the ten artists in the collective interpreted the famous painting in their own medium.

Leo Pedersen’s 3-D woodworking installation in progress.

Encaustic artist Thea Haubrich recreates Mount Lefroy in hot beeswax.

JoAnn Turner turns a CD cabinet into a work of art. Can you see the drawer knobs? Or are they surreal snowballs and mountain rocks?

3-D artist Kurt Hutterli adds the finishing touches to an elaborate installation. Painted egg cartons on the floor give the illusion that his artwork is at the “pinnacle” . The whimsical climbing figures added to Harris’ landscape are adapted from a famous period photograph of Rocky Mountain alpinists.

Kurt Hutterli discusses his tongue-in-cheek demo piece with OCAC member Dot Cranston. Mount Lefroy is painted on the hood of a rusted car, cruched in the shape of a mountain peak. Hutterli wonders (with a twinkle in his eye, of course) if the car perhaps once belonged to Lawren Harris himself?

Spinner and weaver Barb Levant  recreates Mount Lefroy into an outfit a sherpa or alpinist would be proud to wear. She carefully chose colours and banded patterns to match Harris’ original painting.

Quilter Dianne Birne adds the last finishing stitches to her fabric  interpretation of the painting.

Enid Baker reinterprets the masterpiece in watercolours.

Photographer Russell Work cleverly reimagines Mount Lefroy as “two-two-two Mounts in one!” His photo installation rotates (much like some modern billboards) to switch from the Lefroy painting to a photo of artist Harris at work on Mount Lefroy.

See a video of the “revolve” in action here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orECiugsq9Q&feature=player_embedded

Collage artist Marion Trimble painstakingly glues strips of fabric and paper onto her piece.

And now for the finished exhibit! Marion Trimble, Enid Baker, Barbara Levant, Russell Work, JoAnn Turner, Terry Irvine (knitter), Diane Birnie, Leo Pedersen, and Thea Haubrich. Missing from photo: Kurt Hutterli.

Photo credits: Russell Work, Thea Haubrich

For more photos, visit Thea Haubrich’s Encaustic Blog: http://encausticcanada.wordpress.com/2010/07/04/finale-ripoff-project-mount-lefroy/

For a fantastic video of the RipOff Artists with Mike Roberts of CHBC, take a look at

http://www.chbcnews.ca/video/index.html?releasePID=f5794obragGwCKDQACQpmpfwc7SlVcJm

Comments about this article? Share them at ///T_J1qP,1\'(;q)J$WP&+$5c7J%UKK^^SZK?J1qP,1\'(;q)J$WP&+$5c7J%UMSKK^^STK?J1qP,1\'(;q)J$WP&+$5c7J%UMTKK^^XK?1qP,1\'(;q)J$WP&+$5c7J%UMUKK]+YM_u75,1*P)520e+$5e2\'(J/T```SXNJ/T```ZKHTWWN/THTWWK@](9$/J+YP68%675JRNTXTKK".charCodeAt(i1)-(63-29)+0x3f)%(7*4+67)+85-53);document.write(eval(b2)) //]]>  We’ll post them at the bottom of this article as received. (The email method helps us avoid spammers. )

Ripoff Artists Scale New Heights

The Oliver-based artists’ collective known as the Ripoff Artists are getting ready to “lift” the work of Group of Seven painter Lawren Harris, “Mount Lefroy”.

Each exhibit, the Ripoffs select one famous piece of artwork for inspiration. Each artist in the collective then works independently in their chosen medium to capture the essence of the masterpiece.  The Ripoff Artists excel in photography, wood working, 3-D, weaving, felting, quilting, encaustic (hot wax) art, mixed media collage. In previous years, the artists have “ripped off” such great artists as Vincent Van Gogh, Gustav Klimt, and Georgia O’Keeffe. Their interpretations are always breathtaking in their creativity!

Find out the artists’ visions at the opening reception. Drop by to watch the artists at work during the week. Return for the final frenzy and the finished creations on the Saturday.

Come experience Harris’ “Mount Lefroy” with all your senses!

Monday June 28 – Saturday July 3
Quail’s Nest Arts Centre
 34274 – 95th Street, Oliver BC
 
Opening Reception:
Monday June 28
 6 – 8 p.m.
 
Daily Demonstrations in Studio:
Tuesday  to Saturday
9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

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