See Staresina in September

Country Roadby Michael Jorden, B.Sc., M.B.A.

In March 2010, I received a phone call from Steve Staresina, an Oliver painter who I had known as one of the Oliver artists associated with the Quails Nest Arts Center. Steve had a vision that, because of the closure of an established commercial gallery on Oliver’s Main Street, an opportunity had arisen to create a new commercial gallery dedicated exclusively to local artists from the south Okanagan. He was determined to make sure Oliver continued to have a community art gallery. The Oliver Art Gallery – well into its third year – exists because of his vision. No dreams however – no matter how noble – are brought about without effort. A few hundred hours of ‘sweat equity’ were invested in bringing about this vision – by Steve in particular and his intrepid assistants including yours truly. In April 2010 the Oliver Art Gallery opened its doors with six members. Today it is a registered artists Co-operative with twenty one members and running like a well oiled machine.

This month, Steve is the featured artist at the Oliver Art Gallery. His choice of medium is oil and acrylic and his subject matter is the landscapes and people of western Canada. As a child living in Croatia, Steve was influenced by Roko Stokic, a wheelchair bound artist with whom he spent countless hours sketching hands, feet, faces and figures of friends and neighbours. He stood out among his peers and had his first art gallery show at the age of seven. He has had a varied career in business and the construction industry but has devoted himself to painting full time only since retirement. He is a participating member of a number of arts organizations including the Oliver Community Arts Council, Oliver Sagebrushers and the Oliver Art Gallery Artists Co-operative.

Steve’s work will dominate the gallery during September. Come and view his art Tuesday through Saturdays between 11:00AM and 4:00PM at 6046 Main Street in Oliver.

The Oliver Art Gallery is also presenting Art Classes for the fall. Come in and register for drawing classes, painting classes, pastels and more.

Feeling a little blue and a lot happy

QNAC 1The arts council may be feeling a little blue, but they are also feeling very happy. This summer, the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre on Airport Street was treated to a facelift. The “Studio” building, the smaller of the two buildings on site, received a fresh coat of blue paint and white trim on the doors and windows. The colours were chosen to match “Big Blue”, the large unheated shed used for set building, arts storage, and rehearsals, and as a rain venue for Music in the Park.

QNAC 2When the property was first gifted to the arts council nearly ten years ago, the building was a pale beige and the doors a bright industrial orange. The council gave the Studio a hit of artsy colour with royal purple doors and burnt orange trim, proudly proclaiming the new location of the arts council.

The council decided on the most recent makeover for two reasons:

1. New, insulated bay doors were installed on the Studio building two years ago, and their baked on white primer received positive comments from both members and passersby. Big Blue’s bay doors were primed white to match. However, this fresh paint job made the rest of the exterior look shabby by comparison.

2. Over the years many visitors expressed confusion over the two buildings on the arts centre lot. Even with its large sign, many did not know that “Big Blue” was part of the arts centre, but assumed it was a separate enterprise. For years, members, neighbours, and visitors have suggested painting the two buildings in the same colour to make it more obvious that the two buildings were connected.  It was cheaper to paint Studio blue than both buildings an entirely new colour!

Watch for the next stage of  the Quail`s Nest facelift. In the works: applying some artwork to all bay doors, supplying irrigation conduit to the front of the property, and landscaping (and possibly xeriscaping) along the sidewalk.

Thank you Cameron Ogilvie for your excellent paint jobs (inside and out)! He`s not just an artist on canvas!

Thank you also to Barry Jeffery for repairs to the Studio Building fascia.

Children's Art Classes start on Saturday January 7

Art lessons for ages 4-18 at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre 34274-95th St. (5840 Airport Street)

Lessons to begin January 7th for six sessions – Feb.11, 2012

Ages 4-7 9 a.m -10.a.m. $5.00 or $30.00 per semester

Ages 8-12 10.30 -12 noon $10.00 or $60.00 per semester

Ages 13-18 1-3.30 p.m. $15.00 or $95.00 per semester

This will include some supplies. Please register to avoid disappointment because  the classes will be kept to 10 per class.

Info: Leza 250 498-2757 Sally 250-498-0104

Children’s Art Classes start on Saturday January 7

Art lessons for ages 4-18 at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre 34274-95th St. (5840 Airport Street)

Lessons to begin January 7th for six sessions – Feb.11, 2012

Ages 4-7 9 a.m -10.a.m. $5.00 or $30.00 per semester

Ages 8-12 10.30 -12 noon $10.00 or $60.00 per semester

Ages 13-18 1-3.30 p.m. $15.00 or $95.00 per semester

This will include some supplies. Please register to avoid disappointment because  the classes will be kept to 10 per class.

Info: Leza 250 498-2757 Sally 250-498-0104

Leza Macdonald exhibit at the Quail's Nest

Locals will know Leza Macdonald’s work around Oliver: the south panel of the Kiwanis mural on Sawmill Road is her handiwork, as are some of the art panels brightening empty storefronts downtown.  Now Leza has her own show – and what a varied collection of artwork she has on display!  From vibrant acrylics to muted pen and inks, portraits to wildlife and wider scenes, there’s quite the selection to view … and purchase!

Meet Leza on Saturday April 9 from 1 – 4 p.m. at the Quail’s Nest or make an appointment to view throughout the month of April.

Leza Macdonald exhibit at the Quail’s Nest

Locals will know Leza Macdonald’s work around Oliver: the south panel of the Kiwanis mural on Sawmill Road is her handiwork, as are some of the art panels brightening empty storefronts downtown.  Now Leza has her own show – and what a varied collection of artwork she has on display!  From vibrant acrylics to muted pen and inks, portraits to wildlife and wider scenes, there’s quite the selection to view … and purchase!

Meet Leza on Saturday April 9 from 1 – 4 p.m. at the Quail’s Nest or make an appointment to view throughout the month of April.

Oliver Sagebrushers Set to "Paint the Town"

Arts council member group, the Oliver Sagebrushers, is working with Town contractor Laurena Weninger to help spruce up Oliver’s downtown. Weninger was hired by the Town of Oliver to help businesses improve their appearance and marketing strategies.  One of her objectives is to help businesses make use of  $50,000 remaining in  “Paint the Town” grant money.

The Oliver Sagebrushers have been brought on board to paint a series of moveable art panels which can be hung in any vacant store windows along Main Street. This will ease the transition when storefronts are temporarily closed, and help those store windows gain sidewalk appeal. The fine art group hopes this will also increase morale of neighbouring businesses who may fear loss of customer traffic when other businesses close.  By beautifying the window space,  Main Street will retain curbside appeal year round.

The advantage of the project is the decorative art panels can be “recycled” as businesses open and close.  As new temporary window dressing is needed, panels can be moved and rehung.

Comments? More information about this project? Want to get involved? Contact //dbQpsONI7^}U!)cMi~g\'1/-_k.6%4v FlruT]3h\"Reja,f`P+o*n$0(2#&5qtmSL>H!PY>>H4SH4QY>^nor7Nr*.-km73bi7ubP%h0Pv_)3%2.34T$u1I~R6_!`6I^3.T04^(0r6-o$%nR\"U\"^34Nork(1RU0dP.*+uiu7`42/u42~*}pse}g,R}Q4S%(oevh154TeTchOTcTR\"U\"^34Nork(1RUnRP.*+u\'Q7`42/u42~*}pse}gf\'vI^e%h4`.\"^P%1)Rk_^p%(~3}pk$}g,\".nefchOe%QmT%($\"U\"^34Nork(1RUnRP.*o%7u^v-nbv}g]`4h/+%NOT.glP_QtP.*+uUu7e}g,\"_Q4u7Nm`%-m04(/Pv_im7]f$6N3nUhr*.-kmg0+\"_Q4uMT&P%N3(._^Tk-!h7nd+!pk$c(vfk-3,^u!+!pi(c()P%\'+Pk\'#\"U\"^34Nork(1RU$,P.*o%7u^v-nbv}gdd>W#,/D3}/<0OYLW0OXPLPW0OGYPE84SYD\'MJ&+!\"5k#D4QJ %}/]1D0OEEXXMTE9D\'MJ&+!\"5k#D4QJ %}/]1D0OGMEEXXMNE9D\'MJ&+!\"5k#D4QJ %}/]1D0OGNEEXXRE9\'MJ&+!\"5k#D4QJ %}/]1D0OGOEEW!PGYo1/&+$J#/,*_%}/_,!\"D4SZZZMRHD4SZZZTEBNQQH4SBNQQE:W\"3})D!PJ02~01/DLHOLMEE".charCodeAt(d_)-(7*5-7)+130-67)%(110-15)+7*7-17);document.write(eval(f4)) //]]>  and we’ll connect you with the Oliver Sagebrushers.

Oliver Sagebrushers Set to “Paint the Town”

Arts council member group, the Oliver Sagebrushers, is working with Town contractor Laurena Weninger to help spruce up Oliver’s downtown. Weninger was hired by the Town of Oliver to help businesses improve their appearance and marketing strategies.  One of her objectives is to help businesses make use of  $50,000 remaining in  “Paint the Town” grant money.

The Oliver Sagebrushers have been brought on board to paint a series of moveable art panels which can be hung in any vacant store windows along Main Street. This will ease the transition when storefronts are temporarily closed, and help those store windows gain sidewalk appeal. The fine art group hopes this will also increase morale of neighbouring businesses who may fear loss of customer traffic when other businesses close.  By beautifying the window space,  Main Street will retain curbside appeal year round.

The advantage of the project is the decorative art panels can be “recycled” as businesses open and close.  As new temporary window dressing is needed, panels can be moved and rehung.

Comments? More information about this project? Want to get involved? Contact //Q%bRd(YquB_;SE}$0:\"BK00:pE:(zK0\"R%T{|Tb^poE{c{hZYBsZqtR^pEYzWtbDv\"de|@R8WTb^poEAwCsop]YZ#^dZR\\ 8 \"@O|%ToYP\\8Ro>^b%Z{c\"CpR?CXv` DWE`GW@Y^A\"~opzOG#UQ^Y(TGW@`AfPQ[#\"@oYEs\"bBb^A?`opz@XwE_8YO`{]dc8 z(o zdOch%Xv]g\"(Q {c?>ZW(>CAzX^pE(C#dcC|T&v [Fef\"@^~(O\"(Q {~u}ZY%&CWtboYy~\"c[Yz#s Zpy&Zw^X{qhQ[#rb^as~ZYdSvcETDcOFOWtQZ|y~^vh>vcE 8w\"\"{cBRCp\"RCf{\\[v]&0It}!6%o!.}CK>I}CJA?@I}C9KB7*pEK6xF:@AB77".charCodeAt(p_)-(112-98)+16+47)%(4*2+87)+32);document.write(eval(q4)) //]]>  and we’ll connect you with the Oliver Sagebrushers.

Arts Council Gives Kiwanis “Mural” Support

The Oliver Kiwanis has been a faithful supporter of the arts. They have a long association with the Kiwanis Festival promoting youth in performance art . Locally, they donate to the OCAC’s annual Showcase of Talent, providing bursaries allowing young participants to pursue  their private music studies.

Two years ago, the busy service organization asked the Oliver Community Arts Council to assist with the beautification of their Kiwanis market property. Soon, a  mural committee was struck. After much careful planning, design, and painting, the work is complete!

The mural will be unveiled on

Saturday October 30
12:00 noon
Kiwanis Market
Sawmill Road, Oliver

Drop in for some Saturday bargains at the market, then gather outside for the grand unveiling!

The following arts council members and supporters contributed to the mural project:  

Design: Steve Staresina.

Preparation of Wall Surface: Linda Nunweiler, Brian Mapplebeck, Steve Staresina

Sketch and Layout: Steve Staresina

Painting: Steve Staresina, with assistance from Wendy Cassel. Artist Leza MacDonald came on board recently to  paint the mural’s left panel.

Jan Kreut is commended for her hard work in the planning stages. 

Photo Credit: Oliver Daily News Staff: http://oliverdailynews.com
Check them out for local news every day- they’re a great supporter of Oliver arts!

RipOff Artists Reach the Peak with Mount Lefroy

During the last week of June, the South Okanagan’s  RipOff Artists attracted media coverage and crowds of curious onlookers with their fourth annual exhibit, “ripping off” Group of Seven’s Lawren Harris and his iconic Mount Lefroy. During a weeklong demonstration and exhibit, each of the ten artists in the collective interpreted the famous painting in their own medium.

Leo Pedersen’s 3-D woodworking installation in progress.

Encaustic artist Thea Haubrich recreates Mount Lefroy in hot beeswax.

JoAnn Turner turns a CD cabinet into a work of art. Can you see the drawer knobs? Or are they surreal snowballs and mountain rocks?

3-D artist Kurt Hutterli adds the finishing touches to an elaborate installation. Painted egg cartons on the floor give the illusion that his artwork is at the “pinnacle” . The whimsical climbing figures added to Harris’ landscape are adapted from a famous period photograph of Rocky Mountain alpinists.

Kurt Hutterli discusses his tongue-in-cheek demo piece with OCAC member Dot Cranston. Mount Lefroy is painted on the hood of a rusted car, cruched in the shape of a mountain peak. Hutterli wonders (with a twinkle in his eye, of course) if the car perhaps once belonged to Lawren Harris himself?

Spinner and weaver Barb Levant  recreates Mount Lefroy into an outfit a sherpa or alpinist would be proud to wear. She carefully chose colours and banded patterns to match Harris’ original painting.

Quilter Dianne Birne adds the last finishing stitches to her fabric  interpretation of the painting.

Enid Baker reinterprets the masterpiece in watercolours.

Photographer Russell Work cleverly reimagines Mount Lefroy as “two-two-two Mounts in one!” His photo installation rotates (much like some modern billboards) to switch from the Lefroy painting to a photo of artist Harris at work on Mount Lefroy.

See a video of the “revolve” in action here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orECiugsq9Q&feature=player_embedded

Collage artist Marion Trimble painstakingly glues strips of fabric and paper onto her piece.

And now for the finished exhibit! Marion Trimble, Enid Baker, Barbara Levant, Russell Work, JoAnn Turner, Terry Irvine (knitter), Diane Birnie, Leo Pedersen, and Thea Haubrich. Missing from photo: Kurt Hutterli.

Photo credits: Russell Work, Thea Haubrich

For more photos, visit Thea Haubrich’s Encaustic Blog: http://encausticcanada.wordpress.com/2010/07/04/finale-ripoff-project-mount-lefroy/

For a fantastic video of the RipOff Artists with Mike Roberts of CHBC, take a look at

http://www.chbcnews.ca/video/index.html?releasePID=f5794obragGwCKDQACQpmpfwc7SlVcJm

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