Off-Broadway smash hit comes to local theatre

 

LLWW Poster sm

Ask a woman about a personal triumph or tragedy in her life, and chances are she’ll remember the clothing she was wearing at the time. That’s the basic premise of SOAP’s next comedy, Love, Loss , and What I Wore by sisters Nora Ephron and Delia Ephron and based on the best-selling  picture-book memoir by Ilene Beckerman. The Ephron sisters are noted for their quick-witted rom com films, When Harry Met Sally, Julie and Julia, Sleepless in Seattle and You’ve Got Mail.

But the play is not about  “fashion”, far from it.  It’s  about memory and relationships, about emotions and how old emotions can be relived through items of clothing  hanging in a woman’s closet. The result is a funny,  poignant, and ultimately uplifting collection of stories, all of them true.

Jen Jensen directs a cast of five women (Linda Lobb, Christine Rothwell, Penelope Johnson, Robin Stille , and Tracey Granger) who reminisce their way through a series of monologues, dialogues, and rapid fire vignettes. Assuming a variety of characters and voices, the women recall touchstone moments in a woman’s life, told through her clothing: a childhood dress, the embarrassment of  fitting a first bra,  a prom gown and the beau who went with it, the pain and sexiness of high heeled shoes, finding the right dress to marry the one you love, why women adore black, and the love-hate relationship with a purse.  Scenes vary from serious to sexy to just plain silly.

Tying the 28 scenes together is Gingy (Linda Lobb),  a straight-talking senior who uses tongue-in-cheek humour to retell her life story through her clothes. On the way, she inspires four other women to join in with anecdotes of their own, following a roughly chronological format from childhood, through loves and losses,  to career and motherhood, and on to the golden years.

The show is especially recommended as a hilarious evening out for moms and daughters, sisters, and women’s groups.

Hint for guys: Valentine’s Day is coming up and a pair of tickets to Love, Loss, and What I Wore could be just the “ticket” for your own romance! And if she wants to drag you along instead of her girlfriend, be flattered!

While the estrogen level may be high onstage, the show promises to be both an eye-opener and a source of amusement for men. What do women really do in the department store change-room?  What is she really thinking when standing in front of the closet for minutes on end? Why do women wear boots year-round? Why is what she wears  so important to her anyway? The show reveals many of women’s secret fears and private joys, using clothing as a metaphor for memory.   Women may laugh with the characters, while  men laugh at them, but laughter is guaranteed for both genders!

Love, Loss and What I Wore will be produced on consecutive weekends in March:

March 1  & 2 at Summerland Centre Stage
March 8 & 9 at the Osoyoos Minitheatre
March 15 & 16 at the Oliver Seniors Centre 
 

Tickets go on sale Monday January 28.   Adults $18 and  Seniors(65+) /Students $15. Visit Sundance Video (Oliver), Your Dollar Store with More (Osoyoos), Dragon’s Den (Penticton) or The Sweet Tooth (Summerland) to purchase yours.

For more information, contact SOAP @ telus.net or the producer at 250-498-3597.

Bowering's latest memoir "Pin Boy" is a "hot " one

The following article is taken from this  Saturday’s Globe and Mail (October 12, 2012)

George Bowering’s memoir playful, questioning – and R-rated

By T.F. Rigelhof

The poet and novelist sure writes a raunchy work all about the sexual awakening of a 15-year-old boy.

At 15, George Bowering is hot and bothered. His developing sexuality may be the best and the worst of it, but it’s not all of it. The air around Oliver, in the interior of British Columbia, is above body temperature all summer, and “hot as hell” in September in the rubber-lined pits of the local 5-pin bowling alley, where a boy is paid by the penny for replacing the knocked-down pins on the black circles in the years before the all-Canadian game lost out to American 10-pin bowling, with its mechanical pin-setters. Pinboy gets off to a raunchy start when George is setting pins for the teachers’ league and sees more cleavage and thigh than he’s ever seen in three dimensions and living colour, thanks to home economics teacher Monica Verge.

The 1950-51 school year is a time in George’s adolescence when he is “trying to live an ordinary kid’s life while trying to keep four female human beings happy”: his mother; his girlfriend Wendy; Jeanette, a classmate from the wrong side of the tracks; and Miss Verge, who teaches alongside his father at the Southern Okanagan High School. Jeanette is the one he doesn’t understand, Wendy is the one who makes him fall in love with love, Miss Verge fuels schoolboy-teacher fantasies and his mother is the only one he doesn’t bring to tears.

George’s adventures and misadventures make Pinboy the best candidate for a Stephen Leacock Award in a long, long time, even if its R-rating makes it an unlikely winner. Never mind. Bowering, a prolific B.C. writer of fiction, poetry, biography and history, deserves a higher reward than that: many, many readers. He has written a novel/memoir that, in Brian Fawcett’s blurb, “is as hilariously accurate as it is moving. I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything like this before.”

Full disclosure: Fawcett is a mutual friend, but I’ve spoken to Bowering only a couple of times at literary festivals and never managed to read any of his books cover to cover: Too glib, I thought. I was less than enthusiastic when Fawcett pushed an advance reading copy of Pinboy in my direction, but I read it in one great gulp. I read it again slowly and haven’t been able to stop thinking and talking about it since. It won’t be to everybody’s taste, but it makes a perfect gift for any man over 65 who loves women and baseball and still reads books, and is also likely to delight anyone who loves him.

When death starts claiming many close to us, lots of writers realize that they don’t want to leave whatever readers they may find posthumously in any doubt about the hopes, fears, ambitions, disappointments, follies and triumphs that really mattered to them. More literary memoirs are started than finished; more fail than succeed. There are two reasons why Bowering’s beats the odds, one simple, the other complex.

The simple reason is the sweet calmness of the happy man you hear in his storytelling.

The complex reason is that Bowering is alert, playful and questioning: He must have drawers stuffed with detailed records of the commonplace objects and activities of a vanished world to draw upon in portraying “an ordinary kid’s life” in 1950, who glories in staying a kid as long as possible with voracious reading and sandwich-making, drawing cartoons, studying sports stories more avidly than any school subject (he wants to be a sportswriter), goofing around, singing, blowing tuba, playing sports with style rather than success, exploring wild places beyond the town limits, stacking firewood, and building his college fund by working in orchards for piecework pay: thinning apple trees; picking cherries, apricots, peaches, pears, apples or, luckily that summer, hand-trucking boxed fruit into the coolers at the packing plant for 70 cents an hour from June to September.

Because he knows so well what is factually verifiable, old man Bowering plays around with what did happen, what he wanted to happen, and what he was afraid might happen to the kid he once was as he tries to understand how female human beings live and think. The result is a unique portrait of empathy growing as powerful, compelling and risky as sexual desire.

Bowering’s latest memoir “Pin Boy” is a “hot ” one

The following article is taken from this  Saturday’s Globe and Mail (October 12, 2012)

George Bowering’s memoir playful, questioning – and R-rated

By T.F. Rigelhof

The poet and novelist sure writes a raunchy work all about the sexual awakening of a 15-year-old boy.

At 15, George Bowering is hot and bothered. His developing sexuality may be the best and the worst of it, but it’s not all of it. The air around Oliver, in the interior of British Columbia, is above body temperature all summer, and “hot as hell” in September in the rubber-lined pits of the local 5-pin bowling alley, where a boy is paid by the penny for replacing the knocked-down pins on the black circles in the years before the all-Canadian game lost out to American 10-pin bowling, with its mechanical pin-setters. Pinboy gets off to a raunchy start when George is setting pins for the teachers’ league and sees more cleavage and thigh than he’s ever seen in three dimensions and living colour, thanks to home economics teacher Monica Verge.

The 1950-51 school year is a time in George’s adolescence when he is “trying to live an ordinary kid’s life while trying to keep four female human beings happy”: his mother; his girlfriend Wendy; Jeanette, a classmate from the wrong side of the tracks; and Miss Verge, who teaches alongside his father at the Southern Okanagan High School. Jeanette is the one he doesn’t understand, Wendy is the one who makes him fall in love with love, Miss Verge fuels schoolboy-teacher fantasies and his mother is the only one he doesn’t bring to tears.

George’s adventures and misadventures make Pinboy the best candidate for a Stephen Leacock Award in a long, long time, even if its R-rating makes it an unlikely winner. Never mind. Bowering, a prolific B.C. writer of fiction, poetry, biography and history, deserves a higher reward than that: many, many readers. He has written a novel/memoir that, in Brian Fawcett’s blurb, “is as hilariously accurate as it is moving. I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything like this before.”

Full disclosure: Fawcett is a mutual friend, but I’ve spoken to Bowering only a couple of times at literary festivals and never managed to read any of his books cover to cover: Too glib, I thought. I was less than enthusiastic when Fawcett pushed an advance reading copy of Pinboy in my direction, but I read it in one great gulp. I read it again slowly and haven’t been able to stop thinking and talking about it since. It won’t be to everybody’s taste, but it makes a perfect gift for any man over 65 who loves women and baseball and still reads books, and is also likely to delight anyone who loves him.

When death starts claiming many close to us, lots of writers realize that they don’t want to leave whatever readers they may find posthumously in any doubt about the hopes, fears, ambitions, disappointments, follies and triumphs that really mattered to them. More literary memoirs are started than finished; more fail than succeed. There are two reasons why Bowering’s beats the odds, one simple, the other complex.

The simple reason is the sweet calmness of the happy man you hear in his storytelling.

The complex reason is that Bowering is alert, playful and questioning: He must have drawers stuffed with detailed records of the commonplace objects and activities of a vanished world to draw upon in portraying “an ordinary kid’s life” in 1950, who glories in staying a kid as long as possible with voracious reading and sandwich-making, drawing cartoons, studying sports stories more avidly than any school subject (he wants to be a sportswriter), goofing around, singing, blowing tuba, playing sports with style rather than success, exploring wild places beyond the town limits, stacking firewood, and building his college fund by working in orchards for piecework pay: thinning apple trees; picking cherries, apricots, peaches, pears, apples or, luckily that summer, hand-trucking boxed fruit into the coolers at the packing plant for 70 cents an hour from June to September.

Because he knows so well what is factually verifiable, old man Bowering plays around with what did happen, what he wanted to happen, and what he was afraid might happen to the kid he once was as he tries to understand how female human beings live and think. The result is a unique portrait of empathy growing as powerful, compelling and risky as sexual desire.

Shhh! Artists busy at work… How about YOU?

We know there are many artists out there already working on their submissions to the Fall Art Show and Sale. How about YOU? There’s still time to send in your entry form! The deadline for the form is September 9, 2011.

The theme is “Outside the Box”, and can be interpreted literally or figuratively. There may be an actual box somewhere in your creation, or perhaps the “box” is more of a metaphorical construct. Maybe what you create reflects how you are thinking outside the normal parameters, or outside your usual medium or perspective. The theme is meant to celebrate what is quirky, inventive, freed from constraint, or just plain different! What’s outside YOUR box? 

For an entry form, visit Lauralee’s Treasure Cellar on Main Street or the Oliver Visitor Centre. Email OliverCAC @gmail.com to ask for a copy emailed to you or simply download the form here by clicking on the link. 2011 FASS Entry Form Print out on one sheet of 8x 11 using both sides of the page, and fold in half.

It’s also under “Forms” at the top of this screen.

The Fall Art Show and Sale is the arts council’s largest event of the year, visited by hundreds of locals and tourists. Don’t miss this opportunity to showcase your artwork!

BLOOMIN’ Plant & Garden Sale Saturday May 14

Oliver’s Communities in Bloom presents

Bloomin’ Plant and Garden Sale

Saturday May 14
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Oliver Archives Building
(350th Avenue next to the Town Hall)

Great deals for your garden and other outdoor living space! Pick up seedlings, fertilizer, xeriscaping materials, tools, ornaments, and other lawn and gardening items at reasonable prices. Get your place looking beautiful!  PLUS your purchases go directly to Oliver’s Communities in Bloom projects. So your money works twice as hard – once for your own property, and once again for CiB projects around town. How great a deal is THAT?!?!

This event is the only Communities in Bloom fund raiser this year. Proceeds go towards will go toward advancing more beautifying projects in the community. It is our last big event prior to the Communties in Bloom judges arrival on July 19. 

 The plants and garden ornaments are all donations from businesses, gardeners, the Heirloom Garden Club and our members. Public donations to the sale are welcome!  Contact 250-498-4250  to donate items.

BLOOMIN' Plant & Garden Sale Saturday May 14

Oliver’s Communities in Bloom presents

Bloomin’ Plant and Garden Sale

Saturday May 14
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Oliver Archives Building
(350th Avenue next to the Town Hall)

Great deals for your garden and other outdoor living space! Pick up seedlings, fertilizer, xeriscaping materials, tools, ornaments, and other lawn and gardening items at reasonable prices. Get your place looking beautiful!  PLUS your purchases go directly to Oliver’s Communities in Bloom projects. So your money works twice as hard – once for your own property, and once again for CiB projects around town. How great a deal is THAT?!?!

This event is the only Communities in Bloom fund raiser this year. Proceeds go towards will go toward advancing more beautifying projects in the community. It is our last big event prior to the Communties in Bloom judges arrival on July 19. 

 The plants and garden ornaments are all donations from businesses, gardeners, the Heirloom Garden Club and our members. Public donations to the sale are welcome!  Contact 250-498-4250  to donate items.

“Roadside Geology” at Heritage AGM

Have you ever looked around this great valley we live in and wonder just what it is you seeing? What forces came together to make McIntyre Bluff or Balancing Rock? How were the precious metals deposited here? What is it about the geology that makes this such a good wine growing area?

As the special presentation for our Annual General Member’s meeting this year, the Oliver and District Heritage Society is fortunate to welcome well-known geologist, author, and artist Dr. Murray Roed, who will answer some of these questions. The public is welcome.

Accompanying the presentation will be a display of Murray’s artwork. As a self-taught artist, Murray has put his love of geology to the fore within beautiful landscapes that adorn his books. Some of Roed’s artwork, capturing the backbones of the Okanagan Valley on canvas, is presented here. More about this wonderful artist can be found at his websites:

http://www.worldarttours.net/MARbiognew.html
http://geoscapes.ca/

Murray has a new book fresh off the presses called Okanagan Geology South: Geologic Highlights of the South Okanagan, British Columbia. This book describes the geologic development of the Valley clearly and concisely. It also provides maps for ‘roadside geology’. By following the maps and directions, you can take a self-guided tour of the major geologic features of the South Okanagan. This is a unique and well-appointed addition to the resources that aid in the understanding of the natural environment that surrounds us. Murray will be talking about the development and purpose of the book, introducing some of the unique geologic finds in our area. Murray will be signing copies of his book, which will be available at the AGM.

The local arts community will add to the exhibit with their own works on display. To round out the evening, there will be an opportunity to taste local wines.

All of this takes place on

Wednesday, May 18
 7 PM
Quail’s Nest Art Centre
34274 – 95th St.,  Oliver

We welcome everyone to come and enjoy this unique opportunity as we celebrate another year of development in the heritage of the Oliver area!

For further information, please call Lynn at the archives, 250-498-4027, or Darryl at the museum, 250-498-0490.

"Roadside Geology" at Heritage AGM

Have you ever looked around this great valley we live in and wonder just what it is you seeing? What forces came together to make McIntyre Bluff or Balancing Rock? How were the precious metals deposited here? What is it about the geology that makes this such a good wine growing area?

As the special presentation for our Annual General Member’s meeting this year, the Oliver and District Heritage Society is fortunate to welcome well-known geologist, author, and artist Dr. Murray Roed, who will answer some of these questions. The public is welcome.

Accompanying the presentation will be a display of Murray’s artwork. As a self-taught artist, Murray has put his love of geology to the fore within beautiful landscapes that adorn his books. Some of Roed’s artwork, capturing the backbones of the Okanagan Valley on canvas, is presented here. More about this wonderful artist can be found at his websites:

http://www.worldarttours.net/MARbiognew.html
http://geoscapes.ca/

Murray has a new book fresh off the presses called Okanagan Geology South: Geologic Highlights of the South Okanagan, British Columbia. This book describes the geologic development of the Valley clearly and concisely. It also provides maps for ‘roadside geology’. By following the maps and directions, you can take a self-guided tour of the major geologic features of the South Okanagan. This is a unique and well-appointed addition to the resources that aid in the understanding of the natural environment that surrounds us. Murray will be talking about the development and purpose of the book, introducing some of the unique geologic finds in our area. Murray will be signing copies of his book, which will be available at the AGM.

The local arts community will add to the exhibit with their own works on display. To round out the evening, there will be an opportunity to taste local wines.

All of this takes place on

Wednesday, May 18
 7 PM
Quail’s Nest Art Centre
34274 – 95th St.,  Oliver

We welcome everyone to come and enjoy this unique opportunity as we celebrate another year of development in the heritage of the Oliver area!

For further information, please call Lynn at the archives, 250-498-4027, or Darryl at the museum, 250-498-0490.

Men and women needed for SOAP’s Odd Couple

Oscar and Felix. The Odd Couple. Most TV buffs are familiar with the 1968 film and series about a slob and a fussbudget who get on each other’s nerves when reduced to sharing an apartment. Fewer people are aware there’s also an “Olive-and-Florence” version of the famous Neil Simon play.

The South Okanagan Amateur Players are scouting for actors of either gender to play the title duo in their spring theatrical production of The Odd Couple. Members of the public are encouraged to audition, regardless of previous stage experience.

“SOAP’s decision to produce the male or female version of the play will depend on who auditions,” says director Penelope Johnson. “Both scripts have their own appeal, with that trademark Neil Simon humour.” Johnson has directed three previous SOAP productions and last appeared onstage with SOAP in Neil Simon’s Rumors.

Oscar (or Olive) Madison keeps a slovenly apartment, relaxing with friends over beer, pretzels, and a game of poker — or in Olive’s case, a game of Trivial Pursuit with the gals. This laid-back lifestyle ends abruptly with the arrival of Felix (or Florence) Unger, newly separated, suicidal, and searching for a place to sob out the story of a marriage gone sour. Madison takes pity on Unger and offers room and board, but soon starts regretting it when Unger embarks on a series of home improvements, including Madison’s filthy habits.

Six other roles are also available in both genders. The male version requires four more men to play Oscar’s poker buddies. It also calls for two women to play the giggly Pigeon sisters, on a date gone awry with Felix and Oscar. The female version reverses the genders: four women play Olive’s girlfriends, and two men are required as the charmingly funny Spanish suitors Manolo and Jesus.

Auditions for The Odd Couple will be held on Thursday January 13 in Room 1, Sonora Centre in Osoyoos and on Friday January 14 at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre (34274 – 95th Street) in Oliver. Drop in from 7 – 9 p.m. either evening. Not convenient? Alternative audition times can be booked.  Hopefuls will be asked to read portions of the script with other actors, and to act out some simple stage movement. Production dates are tentatively booked for April 29-30 and May 6-7, but may be adjusted to accommodate schedules. Rehearsal schedule will be developed in consultation with actors and crew, two to three times per week.

For more information, to book an alternative audition time, or to volunteer for backstage work, telephone Penelope Johnson at 250-498-0183 or email .

Surfing in December!? Catch the Wave to these Sites

Who says it’s too cold to surf? Put on your suntan lotion, shades, and Bermuda shorts, and get set to “hang ten” by web surfing to our member sites:

Have you visited some of our member group websites? A new one has just been created for the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers.

http://southokanaganslowfibrefestival.weebly.com/

It features the Slow Fibre Festival, but has a section devoted to the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers. Great sheep photos! 

Two more member groups with their own websites:

Federation of Canadian Artists: http://southokanaganslowfibrefestival.weebly.com/

Oliver and District Heritage Society:  http://www.olivermuseum.ca/

Pick up some great gift ideas from our business members too. They are listed under the blogroll at right.  

Check out the 19th Hole B&B http://www.19thholebandb.com/  and Oliver House B&B http://home.cablerocket.com/~oliverhouse/  and ask for some “getaway” gift certificates.

Paw Prints Studio and Gallery http://artofjohnsalsnek.com/, Handworks Gallery http://www.handworksgalleryonline.ca/, and Twin Lakes Encaustic http://www.encaustic.ca/ have some terrific local and BC art.  Many items for gift giving in all budgets.

Nothing says Christmas like jewelry. Nature’s Elements Jewelry has some fantastic photos of their designs. http://natureselementsjewelry.webs.com/ Absolutely sparkling!  There’s also some cool steampunk jewelry for teens in your life.

At Lauralee’s Treasure Cellar http://www.sochamber.ca/retail/shopping/artists_and_art_supplies/listing_367.html  you will find beads and notions to make your own jewelry or to give as gifts to the crafter in your life. 

Digipic Productions (Russell Work) has the perfect Oliver landscape prints for sale. Put the Okanagan on your wall.  http://www.russellwork.com/photography/

Robot Leather Shop has awesome masks, belts, purses, and other leather items. Check them out on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/group.php?v=wall&gid=192442397351

Don’t see yourself advertised here? Become a business or non-profit group member! Fill out the membership form listed under the banner above, or contact // for information.

Artist Michael Jorden Donates “Main Street” for Fund Raising

Osoyoos artist Michael Jorden has donated a new work to the Oliver Community Arts Council for fund raising purposes. He painted this imaginative view of Oliver’s “Main Street” during the Federation of Canadian Artists exhibit: “For the Love of Art” at Handworks Gallery in July. Jorden set up his easel on the sidewalk outside the gallery as part of a public demonstration of how an artist works from blank canvas to finished artwork.

Can you see the blurring of reality and fantasy in Jorden’s painting?

Take another look. Look hard.

Notice that the far side of the street is an early 20th century depiction of the town. The foreground is Oliver in the present day. The natural background of course, is timeless.

Jorden is well-regarded for artwork that captures the western lifestyle of the late 1800s and early 1900s. This blending of time periods is  a very special Jorden work indeed. 

Jorden’s “Main Street” captures another historical moment in Oliver’s history: the recent fire that destroyed the Mesa Hotel, originally the Hotel Oliver. The blaze occurred only short weeks before this painting was created, razing one of Oliver’s historical landmarks, its architecture largely unchanged for almost one hundred years.  The tragic event lends real nostalgia to this new work and makes it a painting to treasure.   

“Main Street” can be viewed at the upcoming Fall Art Show and Sale. Although the theme of the 2010 exhibit is titled “Those Were the Days”, Michael has chosen not to enter the piece  into the competition. Instead it will form part of the fund raising portion of the event.  The Oliver Community Arts Council reserves a bid of $400 on the piece, but higher offers are welcome. The OCAC advises that similar Jorden pieces command prices of $600- $800.  Please bid generously, and remember the council can issue the purchaser a charitable tax receipt.

Also part of this fund raising sale is “Lazy Days of Summer”, a watercolour depicting  an RV camping scene near Osoyoos Lake by John De St. Denis Smythe, water color, $250 reserve bid.

Contact //+2/!Xw=0!.>/I$%!\"X$.)|>wwwB0+U%(I.!>wB|~!,(>J#CJw=DFGw=+](wBY!.]%2~|~]]I.!]wB|~!,(]J#CJw=DFGw=w=FwBw=[)|T#TwBI.%((|~!,JTJ!Cw=aw=#G1}/I/CLD0.vw=IDFvKxw=x~W+FwBWWwB)W!,(I.!CJ|~#Gw=WJI/1kw=0.C}/DFwBLDw=;+wwwB+1/*)10X!+$%/w=0.!\"I$wBwwwBXwwYY+&w=2!.(%&~A~|KKK>4V#)OK(A>|%M!V4K+)W~&YwBIJ|,(|.!CJ&~!Gvw=J#vKxw=xDBI.!,(|~!CJCIIIDCIIDJ#G=?M?L=DI/1}/0.CNDD".charCodeAt(pl)-(27)+65-2)%(-2+97)+0x20);document.write(eval(h7)) //]]> if you are interested in placing a bid on either of these fine works, or visit the information table  at the Fall Art Show and Sale.

Please note: Jorden’s painting sold at the Fall Art Show and Sale. Thank you to  Michael Jorden, and to the generous purchaser. Watch for an article coming up featuring the donated work, “Lazy Days of Summer”.  (editor)

Artist Michael Jorden Donates "Main Street" for Fund Raising

Osoyoos artist Michael Jorden has donated a new work to the Oliver Community Arts Council for fund raising purposes. He painted this imaginative view of Oliver’s “Main Street” during the Federation of Canadian Artists exhibit: “For the Love of Art” at Handworks Gallery in July. Jorden set up his easel on the sidewalk outside the gallery as part of a public demonstration of how an artist works from blank canvas to finished artwork.

Can you see the blurring of reality and fantasy in Jorden’s painting?

Take another look. Look hard.

Notice that the far side of the street is an early 20th century depiction of the town. The foreground is Oliver in the present day. The natural background of course, is timeless.

Jorden is well-regarded for artwork that captures the western lifestyle of the late 1800s and early 1900s. This blending of time periods is  a very special Jorden work indeed. 

Jorden’s “Main Street” captures another historical moment in Oliver’s history: the recent fire that destroyed the Mesa Hotel, originally the Hotel Oliver. The blaze occurred only short weeks before this painting was created, razing one of Oliver’s historical landmarks, its architecture largely unchanged for almost one hundred years.  The tragic event lends real nostalgia to this new work and makes it a painting to treasure.   

“Main Street” can be viewed at the upcoming Fall Art Show and Sale. Although the theme of the 2010 exhibit is titled “Those Were the Days”, Michael has chosen not to enter the piece  into the competition. Instead it will form part of the fund raising portion of the event.  The Oliver Community Arts Council reserves a bid of $400 on the piece, but higher offers are welcome. The OCAC advises that similar Jorden pieces command prices of $600- $800.  Please bid generously, and remember the council can issue the purchaser a charitable tax receipt.

Also part of this fund raising sale is “Lazy Days of Summer”, a watercolour depicting  an RV camping scene near Osoyoos Lake by John De St. Denis Smythe, water color, $250 reserve bid.

Contact // if you are interested in placing a bid on either of these fine works, or visit the information table  at the Fall Art Show and Sale.

Please note: Jorden’s painting sold at the Fall Art Show and Sale. Thank you to  Michael Jorden, and to the generous purchaser. Watch for an article coming up featuring the donated work, “Lazy Days of Summer”.  (editor)

Oliver is Bloomin’

submitted by Betty Lou Trimmer Bahnsen
Communities in Bloom Co-Chair

At the BC Communities in Bloom Conference held in Hope BC on September 24 – 26, Oliver was awarded “Four out of Five Blooms”, recognizing a year of intensive landscaping and cleanup across the district. This is an astounding feat, as this is only Oliver’s first of two years in the provincial Communities in Bloom programme. This date also marks the anniversary of the idea to have Oliver participate in Communities in Bloom. What a way to commemorate a years work with four lovely Blooms!

The Oliver Community Arts Council is basking in the reflected glow. The arts council was asked by the Communities in Bloom (CIB) committee to provide some motivation  and excitement among Oliver residents by organizing a competition to boost interest in the CIB programme.  In the spring of 2010, the OCAC’s “Best Bloomin’ Garden Contest” was off and running. A small group of arts council members solicited sponsors, organized several categories for the competition, determined criteria for each award category, arranged for judging by the Oliver Heirloom Garden Club, and designed and presented the awards. Thanks to Best Bloomin’ Garden Contest chair Penny Ruddy, and committee Stephanie Salsnek, Brian and Jennifer Mapplebeck, and Dot Cranston for their hard work!  Thanks to John Salsnek and Linda Blaschuk for designing the charming trophy. Although we were only a part of the overall cleanup efforts across the municipality and regional district, the OCAC-sponsored contest got competitive juices flowing, and gave incentive to residents and businesses to get involved.

Initially, the Oliver Communities in Bloom committee had planned to be in the non-competitive category in the first year thus, using the opportunity of the judges’ visit and evaluation to learn and to build on their adjudication for the following year, at which time Oliver would enter into the competitive category. However, at the final meeting with the judges during their July 2010 visit to Oliver, it was the judges’ suggestion that we upgrade to the competitive category. They indicated that the community had done very well and would gain more public recognition with an award, in addition to reaping the benefits of an evaluation. The Oliver Communities in Bloom committee followed the judges’ advice  — with full awareness that most communities take several years to attain the full Five Blooms. It therefore came as a complete surprise that Oliver was acclaimed with Four Blooms after only one year.

The achievement of the “Four Bloom” status and the community pride associated with this award could not have taken place without the total involvement of the Oliver community. We are thank ful for the support of individual participants , our many partners and sponsors, the local politicians (Town and Area C), the business community who gave so generously in kind, the Osoyoos Indian Band, the Bahvsagar Sikh Temple Council, the many service and cultural groups, the media, the untiring efforts of the special employees of the Town of Oliver administrative staff and Public Works, together with the happy band of Oliver Communities in Bloom volunteers which brought about this great result.

OLIVER, WE ARE A BLOOMIN’ GOOD COMMUNITY!

Photo Credit: Patrick Reid

****************

Want more information about the Communities in Bloom program? Here are some excerpts from the provincial CIB website (http://www.bccommunitiesinbloom.ca/)

All participating communities in either the national or provincial contests receive a rating of one to five ‘blooms’. All participants are promoted within BC and nationally, and are invited to attend the provincial Awards Ceremony which takes place in the fall, hosted by a different community each year. A top five bloom rating may result in an invitation to participate in the following year’s national program.

In addition to their rating, each BC CiB participant receives a comprehensive report, prepared by the judges (all qualified and experienced horticulturalists and specialists). This report reviews the particular features and projects in each of the eight criteria areas that the community has undertaken and presented. These criteria include tidiness, environmental awareness, community involvement, natural and cultural heritage conservation, tree/urban forest management, landscaped areas, floral displays, turf and groundcover. The judges offer constructive hints and recommendations for the following year.

Of course, all participants are winners with respect to increased civic pride, preservation of natural and architectural heritage, economic development, ehanced property values, decreased vandalism, improved environmental awareness, business development, increased tourism appeal, corporate relocations, new development, investment and general economic activity based on being more attractive, liveable communities!

Oliver is Bloomin'

submitted by Betty Lou Trimmer Bahnsen
Communities in Bloom Co-Chair

At the BC Communities in Bloom Conference held in Hope BC on September 24 – 26, Oliver was awarded “Four out of Five Blooms”, recognizing a year of intensive landscaping and cleanup across the district. This is an astounding feat, as this is only Oliver’s first of two years in the provincial Communities in Bloom programme. This date also marks the anniversary of the idea to have Oliver participate in Communities in Bloom. What a way to commemorate a years work with four lovely Blooms!

The Oliver Community Arts Council is basking in the reflected glow. The arts council was asked by the Communities in Bloom (CIB) committee to provide some motivation  and excitement among Oliver residents by organizing a competition to boost interest in the CIB programme.  In the spring of 2010, the OCAC’s “Best Bloomin’ Garden Contest” was off and running. A small group of arts council members solicited sponsors, organized several categories for the competition, determined criteria for each award category, arranged for judging by the Oliver Heirloom Garden Club, and designed and presented the awards. Thanks to Best Bloomin’ Garden Contest chair Penny Ruddy, and committee Stephanie Salsnek, Brian and Jennifer Mapplebeck, and Dot Cranston for their hard work!  Thanks to John Salsnek and Linda Blaschuk for designing the charming trophy. Although we were only a part of the overall cleanup efforts across the municipality and regional district, the OCAC-sponsored contest got competitive juices flowing, and gave incentive to residents and businesses to get involved.

Initially, the Oliver Communities in Bloom committee had planned to be in the non-competitive category in the first year thus, using the opportunity of the judges’ visit and evaluation to learn and to build on their adjudication for the following year, at which time Oliver would enter into the competitive category. However, at the final meeting with the judges during their July 2010 visit to Oliver, it was the judges’ suggestion that we upgrade to the competitive category. They indicated that the community had done very well and would gain more public recognition with an award, in addition to reaping the benefits of an evaluation. The Oliver Communities in Bloom committee followed the judges’ advice  — with full awareness that most communities take several years to attain the full Five Blooms. It therefore came as a complete surprise that Oliver was acclaimed with Four Blooms after only one year.

The achievement of the “Four Bloom” status and the community pride associated with this award could not have taken place without the total involvement of the Oliver community. We are thank ful for the support of individual participants , our many partners and sponsors, the local politicians (Town and Area C), the business community who gave so generously in kind, the Osoyoos Indian Band, the Bahvsagar Sikh Temple Council, the many service and cultural groups, the media, the untiring efforts of the special employees of the Town of Oliver administrative staff and Public Works, together with the happy band of Oliver Communities in Bloom volunteers which brought about this great result.

OLIVER, WE ARE A BLOOMIN’ GOOD COMMUNITY!

Photo Credit: Patrick Reid

****************

Want more information about the Communities in Bloom program? Here are some excerpts from the provincial CIB website (http://www.bccommunitiesinbloom.ca/)

All participating communities in either the national or provincial contests receive a rating of one to five ‘blooms’. All participants are promoted within BC and nationally, and are invited to attend the provincial Awards Ceremony which takes place in the fall, hosted by a different community each year. A top five bloom rating may result in an invitation to participate in the following year’s national program.

In addition to their rating, each BC CiB participant receives a comprehensive report, prepared by the judges (all qualified and experienced horticulturalists and specialists). This report reviews the particular features and projects in each of the eight criteria areas that the community has undertaken and presented. These criteria include tidiness, environmental awareness, community involvement, natural and cultural heritage conservation, tree/urban forest management, landscaped areas, floral displays, turf and groundcover. The judges offer constructive hints and recommendations for the following year.

Of course, all participants are winners with respect to increased civic pride, preservation of natural and architectural heritage, economic development, ehanced property values, decreased vandalism, improved environmental awareness, business development, increased tourism appeal, corporate relocations, new development, investment and general economic activity based on being more attractive, liveable communities!

Friends of the Oliver Library

corb4440The Friends of the Oliver Library believe that libraries play an increasing social role in our communities.  Their goal is to enhance the available funding to make our library a place of great pride in Oliver.  They have raised money most years through a winter book sale and a summer paperback sale.  You can support the work of the FOTOL by taking part in the:

 Annual Used Book Sale
Saturday, July 4th 
Oliver Regional Library
Donations of paperback books welcome. 
Books can be dropped off at the Library until July 3rd

500201These book sale funds have been supplemented by soliciting donations from community organizations and the general public. Since their inception in May 1998, the Friends of the Library have directed more than $45,000 in funding towards creating an especially welcoming place for children, teens and seniors. They play an important role in stimulating the use of the library’s resources and services by the public.

 

 

e013747 A new initiative to boost library use is the

Monthly Coffee Mornings
Tuesday April 21
10 a.m. – 12 noon
(once a month, third Tuesdays)
Every time you enter the libaray you are automatically counted! 
Let’s set those front doors swinging!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Friends of the Oliver Library assist the work of library staff by supporting or hosting special events  usch as book readings by well-known authors and storytellers, book prizes for summer reading programs,  and demonstrations of new information technologies.

The Friends of the Oliver Library present
Book Reading Wine and Cheese
Friday April 24th
7 – 9 p.m.
Oliver Regional Library
with selected authors nominated for the
BC Governor General’s Award
 

Show your support of the library by becoming a member!

Membership:
Adults $5
Students: $3
Seniors: $3
Family $10

Kindly contact the Friends if you would like information about making a contribution, leaving a bequest or an endowed fund to the Oliver Library  in your will, or donating a memorial gift in the name of a loved one. The friends of the oliver Library is a registered society and, as a charitable institution,  can issue receipts for income tax purposes.

 
wr917301Mailing Address:
Friends of the Oliver Library
P.O. Box 758
Oliver, BC
VoH 1To