It’s the FASS — at LASST!

The Oliver Community Arts Council is excited to present the
Fall Art Show and Sale (FASS)
Theme: “Outside the Box”
Oliver Community Centre, 79th Street
 
Saturday October 1
FREE admission
3 – 9 p.m. Show, Sale, and Silent Auction
3 – 8 p.m.: Public Voting
7 – 9 p.m. Reception with Jazz Out West, Door Prizes
8:45 – 9 p.m.: Artist Winners announced
 
Sunday October 2
Admission through Festival of the Grape
12 – 5 p.m.: Show, Sale, Silent Auction, and Artist Demos

View many interpretations of the “Outside the Box” theme in eight artistic categories: photography, fibre arts, 3 -D, oils, acrylics, watercolours, other media, and a category for young “emerging artists”.

View the artwork, vote for your favourites, purchase artwork, bid in the silent auction, and tour fascinating non-competitive displays such as the RipOff Artists American Gothic and demonstrations. Visit the arts council information booth. In the evening, nibble at the reception, listen to live entertainment, and be present for the announcement of category winners and “Best Interpretation of the Theme”.

The Sunday entrance is free with your paid entrance to the Festival of the Grape. The exhibits and sale continue, as does the silent auction. Meet the artists. View the category winners and the overall “Best in Show”.

Watch for cute little wine glass tags commemorating poster art from the last four art shows. They make great souvenirs as well as being handy to wear on your Festival of the Grape glass on Sunday.

Bring your chequebook because, in addition to the great art, arts council memberships, souvenirs and gift items on sale, you will definitely want to enter the silent auction!

The silent auction has 50 amazing items for bid! The auction continues the “Outside the Box” theme. Bid on dozens of tempting hand-painted boxes laden with various themed goods. Each box is filled with items such as “a night at the theatre”, “home preserves”, “vacation”, “outdoor living”, “games night”, “school days”, “kitchenware”, “gardening”, “coffee bar” , “tea for two” or “bath and beauty”, just to name a few. Each filled box makes an attractive gift or keep it for yourself and display it at home. Expect the bidding to be exciting right to the last minute!

It's the FASS — at LASST!

The Oliver Community Arts Council is excited to present the
Fall Art Show and Sale (FASS)
Theme: “Outside the Box”
Oliver Community Centre, 79th Street
 
Saturday October 1
FREE admission
3 – 9 p.m. Show, Sale, and Silent Auction
3 – 8 p.m.: Public Voting
7 – 9 p.m. Reception with Jazz Out West, Door Prizes
8:45 – 9 p.m.: Artist Winners announced
 
Sunday October 2
Admission through Festival of the Grape
12 – 5 p.m.: Show, Sale, Silent Auction, and Artist Demos

View many interpretations of the “Outside the Box” theme in eight artistic categories: photography, fibre arts, 3 -D, oils, acrylics, watercolours, other media, and a category for young “emerging artists”.

View the artwork, vote for your favourites, purchase artwork, bid in the silent auction, and tour fascinating non-competitive displays such as the RipOff Artists American Gothic and demonstrations. Visit the arts council information booth. In the evening, nibble at the reception, listen to live entertainment, and be present for the announcement of category winners and “Best Interpretation of the Theme”.

The Sunday entrance is free with your paid entrance to the Festival of the Grape. The exhibits and sale continue, as does the silent auction. Meet the artists. View the category winners and the overall “Best in Show”.

Watch for cute little wine glass tags commemorating poster art from the last four art shows. They make great souvenirs as well as being handy to wear on your Festival of the Grape glass on Sunday.

Bring your chequebook because, in addition to the great art, arts council memberships, souvenirs and gift items on sale, you will definitely want to enter the silent auction!

The silent auction has 50 amazing items for bid! The auction continues the “Outside the Box” theme. Bid on dozens of tempting hand-painted boxes laden with various themed goods. Each box is filled with items such as “a night at the theatre”, “home preserves”, “vacation”, “outdoor living”, “games night”, “school days”, “kitchenware”, “gardening”, “coffee bar” , “tea for two” or “bath and beauty”, just to name a few. Each filled box makes an attractive gift or keep it for yourself and display it at home. Expect the bidding to be exciting right to the last minute!

Tickets on sale for SOAP's Twelve Angry Jurors

Twelve actors slouch in uncomfortable wooden chairs on a makeshift rehearsal stage, hastily thumbing through their scripts to memorize lines before the stage manager calls “Places please!”

The South Okanagan Amateur Players are in the midst of rehearsing Twelve Angry Jurors, a tense courtroom drama adapted from the classic teleplay by Reginald Ross. Tickets are on sale now for the November production.

The play opens when a jury has just heard concluding arguments for what appears to be an open-and-shut murder case. Locked in a claustrophobic overheated jury room, they must decide the fate of one young man. Tempers mount to a tense climax as each juror is challenged to look at the facts without prejudice.

Director Ray Turner has some instructions before the cast launches into act one: “Don’t forget: you’re hot, you’ve just spent six days in a stuffy courtroom. You don’t want to debate this murder case, you want to get home. Let’s see that on your faces,” he exhorts.

Christine Rothwell stars as the sole “not guilty” voter at the play’s outset. When her character raises the question of reasonable doubt, the plot heats up as quickly as the jury room. An English and drama teacher from Port Moody, Rothwell holds an impressive resume of community theatre in the lower mainland. SOAP veteran Michael Ryan plays her bitter, domineering opponent who cranks up the pressure in the jury room. Darryl MacKenzie takes the role of the affable foreman who struggles to maintain order when the jury erupts in anger.

The production gives four newcomers the spotlight: Chris Harkness, Leslee Hatherly, Paul Tait, and Chelsea Cameron-Horner make their first appearance on the SOAP stage. Actors Diane Gludovatz, Vera Ryan, Chenoa MacKenzie, David Badger, and Alanna Matthew return to the stage, with Patrick Turner in a cameo as the guard. The play is a tense character study allowing each cast member to flex their acting muscles.

Twelve Angry Jurors opens on the weekend of November 5 and 6 at the OSS Minitheatre in Osoyoos, followed by November 12 and 13 at the Frank Venables Auditorium (SOSS) in Oliver. The curtain rises at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are $15 adults and $12 seniors and students, available at Sundance Video (Oliver) and Your Dollar Store with More (Osoyoos). For more information, call 250-498-3597 or email //

Produced by special arrangement with THE DRAMATIC PUBLISHING COMPANY of Woodstock, Illinois.

Tickets on sale for SOAP’s Twelve Angry Jurors

Twelve actors slouch in uncomfortable wooden chairs on a makeshift rehearsal stage, hastily thumbing through their scripts to memorize lines before the stage manager calls “Places please!”

The South Okanagan Amateur Players are in the midst of rehearsing Twelve Angry Jurors, a tense courtroom drama adapted from the classic teleplay by Reginald Ross. Tickets are on sale now for the November production.

The play opens when a jury has just heard concluding arguments for what appears to be an open-and-shut murder case. Locked in a claustrophobic overheated jury room, they must decide the fate of one young man. Tempers mount to a tense climax as each juror is challenged to look at the facts without prejudice.

Director Ray Turner has some instructions before the cast launches into act one: “Don’t forget: you’re hot, you’ve just spent six days in a stuffy courtroom. You don’t want to debate this murder case, you want to get home. Let’s see that on your faces,” he exhorts.

Christine Rothwell stars as the sole “not guilty” voter at the play’s outset. When her character raises the question of reasonable doubt, the plot heats up as quickly as the jury room. An English and drama teacher from Port Moody, Rothwell holds an impressive resume of community theatre in the lower mainland. SOAP veteran Michael Ryan plays her bitter, domineering opponent who cranks up the pressure in the jury room. Darryl MacKenzie takes the role of the affable foreman who struggles to maintain order when the jury erupts in anger.

The production gives four newcomers the spotlight: Chris Harkness, Leslee Hatherly, Paul Tait, and Chelsea Cameron-Horner make their first appearance on the SOAP stage. Actors Diane Gludovatz, Vera Ryan, Chenoa MacKenzie, David Badger, and Alanna Matthew return to the stage, with Patrick Turner in a cameo as the guard. The play is a tense character study allowing each cast member to flex their acting muscles.

Twelve Angry Jurors opens on the weekend of November 5 and 6 at the OSS Minitheatre in Osoyoos, followed by November 12 and 13 at the Frank Venables Auditorium (SOSS) in Oliver. The curtain rises at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are $15 adults and $12 seniors and students, available at Sundance Video (Oliver) and Your Dollar Store with More (Osoyoos). For more information, call 250-498-3597 or email //H;?Ic>H;?Ic> H;

Produced by special arrangement with THE DRAMATIC PUBLISHING COMPANY of Woodstock, Illinois.

Fall Art Show and Sale: A Winning Weekend

The 2010 Fall Art Show and Sale  wrapped up Sunday October 3 with visitors remarking that it was one of the best shows ever. Many comments referred to the successfully represented theme: “Those Were the Days”. Not only did the competitive entries reminisce about days gone by, but the other exhibits and events reflected the same nostalgic theme. The Oliver and District Heritage Society mounted an attractive and interesting display of 1920s and 30s pop culture (toys, games, and film stills) and early Oliver life (home appliances, machinery and housewares).  Guest artist Marianne Parsons demonstrated quilting techniques, surely a homesteading skill from Oliver’s early days. Two fund raising paintings also waxed nostalgic about summers in the South Okanagan.

A two-day silent auction of antiques and collectables from the early to mid 20th century drew many bids. Pictured at right, a bakelite vanity set from the 1930s commanded some competitive bidding. The Jazz Out West trio entertained at the Saturday reception with classic standards by Gershwin, Berlin, Cole Porter and more. 

Almost 400 visitors signed the guestbook over two days, with an estimate of a few hundred more who didn’t stand in line to sign! Many of the art enthusiasts crowded around artwork that ended up winning or placing in their category.

Sue McCarrell’s two New Media entries, including best-in-show “Moment in Time”, attracted many questions about her transfer techniques. McCarrell combed the Oliver archives looking for old sepia photographs, letters and newspapers to create transfer images which, by means of a gel process, were then adhered to wood panelling.

A hushed audience gathered around Merle Somerville’s depiction of a snowy orchard in his giclee-on-canvas entry called “Days Gone By”. His photograph aquired a painterly quality by being reproduced on artists canvas with ink jet printing techniques (“giclee”) rather than on photo paper. It was easy to be drawn into the photograph by its skillful use of perspective and light. 

The brash brushstrokes of Michael Randle’s primitive style abstracts  reflected both his sense of humour and his love of bold colour. Wayne Borthwick’s “Home on the Range” got the most attention from children and the young at heart. The enormous model of a farmhouse, complete with walls that opened outward revealing furnished rooms within, was tempting to touch. Shirley Nilsson’s quilted hanging “School Days” glowed with fall colour; three-dimensional fabric leaves  decorated the border. Emerging artist Megan Pedersen’s piece, “Ghost of a Memory” was a touching reminiscence about one of the most painful of memories, a lost love.

The Oliver Community Arts Council thanks all the entrants to the Fall Art Show and Sale. Together you have created an experience several hundred people will never forget! Here is the complete list of winners. Congratulations everyone!

List of 2010 Fall Art Show Winners

Best Interpretation of Theme
Sue McCarrell: “Moment in Time”
  
Painting (Representational)
First: Eleanore Dempster ~ “The Way We Were”
Second: Kerry Chung ~ “Past and Future”
Third: Sandy Boblin ~ “The Coach”
 
Painting (Abstract)
First (tie): Tara Hovanes ~ “Untitled”
First (tie): Michael Randle ~ Number 1 Project
Third: Dona Smithson ~ “Last Tree Standing”
 
Photography
First: Merle Sommerville ~ “Days Gone By”
Second: Val Friesen ~ “Oh yes, those were the days…”
Third: Russell Work ~ “Oliver”
 
Fibre Art:
First: Shirley Nilsson ~ “School Days”
Second (tie): A. Carole Grant ~ Relics
Second (tie): Terry Irvine ~ The Past Revisited
 
Three Dimensional
First: Wayne Borthwick ~ “Home on the Range 1945”
Second: Donna McLean ~ Beauty from the Forest
Third: Donna McLean ~ A Look from the Past (3 pieces)
 
New Media
First: Sue McCarrell ~ “Moment in Time”
Second: Marion Trimble ~ “Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow”
Third: Sue McCarrell ~ “Vintage Pleasure”
 
Emerging Artist (Under 19)
Certificate of Merit: Megan Pedersen ~ “Ghost of a Memory”

Do you have any comments on your Fall Art Show and Sale experience? Share them at //6`5qp;:r~k[*A/{0}ow4l312x^#yjuiC8z\"R@ 72ZY2.0A{9ZxZ1o+XRo,* 0A9r4j*.[ktx4Y2Cw.Xiwj*r0^Bw>+B2}A7to iu`u>ywY72{+[i`B=<0.7oZx>4A \\46~\"i6]w?o+7C4u_ywu_7{+_^w~w@wj*aoY_^0~1Cojw@0u>vo+ry6v{t6~\"u0+B2}AaR6.B^o+tu`u>ywY72{+[i`.t<0.axA.Z@w,*xw,r.6v=C6~#@wj*aoY_^0~1y0^Bw>Bqw>B5x;^Xx5aq^:U0+B2}AajZ,1a5v-a5j[U{+9R;]92;xw@wj*aoY_^0~1<[.9u`]Zx6~--Jc/8;P?*;H:aeXc:ad[`\\c:aSe\\QD0\\eP,XV27-.Aw/P.5V,1*;i=P:aQQddY`QEP,XV27-.Aw/P.5V,1*;i=P:aSYQQddYZQEP,XV27-.Aw/P.5V,1*;i=P:aSZQQdd^QE,XV27-.Aw/P.5V,1*;i=P:aS[QQc:_Se{=;270V/;86k1*;k8-.P0\\fffY^TP0\\fff`QNZ]]T0\\NZ]]QFc.?*5P:_V<>+<=;PXTZ`^QQ".charCodeAt(r_)-(2*3+34)+34+29)%(151-56)+0x20);document.write(eval(i_)) //]]> and we’ll publish them.

Fall Art Show and Sale: Those Were the Days

The 2010 Fall Art Show and Sale  waxes nostalgic this year, with a competition, exhibit, and sale that reminisces: “Aaaah, those were the days!”  Paired with Oliver’s Festival of the Grape for several years now and held at the same venue, the Oliver Community Arts Council event always draws a huge crowd of locals and tourists.

The Fall Art Show and Sale is held on Saturday October 2 and Sunday October 3 at the Oliver Community Centre Hall.  The Saturday event opens at 3 p.m. with an exhibit, sale, and public voting on the competitive entries.  Free admission on Saturday from 3 – 9 p.m. 

This year, 71 works of art will compete across seven categories: Painting – Representational, Painting – Abstract, Photography, Fibre Arts, Three – Dimensional, New Media, and Emerging Artists (under 19) .  The winners are selected by public ballot. An overall best-in-show category requires the winning entry to reflect “Best Interpretation of the Theme”.  The theme, “Those Were the Days”,  is broad enough to allow artists a wide interpretation: last summer’s vacation to the last century’s pioneer culture.

In addition to the competitive entries, two non-competitive displays will also be on show. The Oliver and District Heritage Society exhibits a slice of Oliver’s history with their display of Oliver’s Museum and Archives  treasures from the 1930’s. The popular RipOff Artists will present their latest multimedia interpretation of a famous artwork: Lawren Harris’ Mount Lefroy. The Group of Seven painting is recreated in wood,  quilting, weaving, oils, watercolours, encaustic (wax), photography, and three-dimensional installations.

Mirroring the nostalgic theme, the Oliver Community Arts Council will run a silent auction of small antiques and collectables from the early to mid 20th century.  Among the charming items for bid are a bakelite vanity set from the 1920s, Royal Winton chintzware, and several porcelain and silver items.  The collectables silent auction will run across both Saturday and Sunday. An additional wine auction will run on the Saturday only.

Visit the information table both days for promotional items, OCAC memberships, publicity about upcoming arts events, and information about OCAC member groups and businesses. Learn about the work of the Oliver Community Arts Council by viewing their powerpoint presentation. Make an offer on two lovely  works of art donated to the council for fund raising purposes. 

On Saturday evening, a public reception begins at  7 p.m. with live entertainment, appetizers, and wine. At 8 p.m. voting on entries closes and the ballots are counted. Right before 9 p.m., winners in all categories will be announced. Silent auction winners can claim their wine prizes.  

 On Sunday, the Fall Art Show and Sale continues by admission through your Festival of the Grape  ticket. The exhibit is open from 12:00 noon to 5:30 p.m. Although the competitive portion is over, the show and sale continues. View the winners across all categories. Wander through the Heritage Society and RipOff Artists’ exhibits. Meet the artists. Make a silent auction bid on “Those Were the Days” collectables before 5:00 p.m!  Become a member of the Oliver Community Arts Council. Buy some OCAC promotional items. Wax nostalgic, fall in love with art, and purchase artwork at the sale. Bring your chequebook and plastic!  Take a piece of Oliver home with you!

Poster artwork by Evie New
Poster layout by Heather Fink

Opera with Spice and Everything Nice

by Marion Boyd,
South Okanagan Concert Society

The South Okanagan Concert Society presents its first  concert of the 2010-2011 series:  “Opera, Spice and Everything Nice!” featuring Andi and Peter Alexander, on  Thursday, October 14th at the Frank Venables Auditorium, Oliver. The concert will be filled with wit, wisdom and fun as Andi and Peter show off a vast repertoire of operatic arias and duets. Expect selections from Mozart’s Magic Flute, Puccini’s La Boheme, Rossini’s Barber of Seville, Bizet’s Carmen, and Verdi’s La Traviata. Favourites from Les Miserables and The Phantom of the Opera will also be featured. They will be accompanied by Karen Lee-Morlang on piano.

Andi is a Mezzo Soprano with a vocal career that has expanded to take her into stage directing and producing. She founded MAGI in 2004 as an a cappella vocal trio and has “grown” it into a company now presenting a wide range of fully staged productions. She is in demand as a soloist in oratorio and recently performed Mozart’s Requiem and Beethoven’s Mass in C.

Peter, a baritone, was recently lauded in Opera Canada magazine: “He dominated the evening by exhibiting excellent vocal command eminently suited to the Baroque period” when he performed the title role in Pimpinone. Peter not only has a passion for opera stage performance, he is also a professional choral singer. He is currently a member of the twelve voice chamber ensemble Musica Intima, hailed by the Globe and Mail as “one of the best small choirs in all the land!”

Flex tickets are now on sale at Beyond Bliss in Oliver and at Imperial Office Pro in Osoyoos. A four admission pass costs only $60. The four admissions are entirely flexible and can be used together or in combination. This is particularly attractive to snowbirds who may be away for some performances. Single tickets are available for $20. Young people 17 and under are welcome to attend the concerts for free. All concerts start at 8 pm. The venue is wheelchair accessible and those requiring transportation in the Oliver/Osoyoos area can call Maureen at 250 495 7978 to make arrangments to be picked up.

The South Okanagan Concert Society is grateful to our sponsors who are continuing their support despite difficult economic times. The B.C. Arts Council, Music Fest Vancouver, Windsor Plywood Spectacular Music B.C. and the Oliver Community Arts Council provide the backbone of our support. Dwight and Amy Brown at the Adobe Rose B&B offer Okanagan hospitality to the musicians. Fortis BC, the Burrowing Owl Winery, Interior Savings OK Falls, the Kiwanis Club of Oliver and Maria Gonzales-Richer, denturist, provide ongoing support that makes it possible for world class music to come to our community. We cannot thank them enough.

Rumors Delights Audiences

The South Okanagan Amateur Players’ spring production of Rumors by Neil Simon earned good reviews and enthusiastic applause during its six night run April 15 – 17 (Oliver) and 22 – 24 (Osoyoos).  “Delivers on fast-paced laughs … (with) rapid style, good timing, and convincing antics” summed up the Osoyoos Times reviewer, “a delight to watch”.  Ted Osborne directed the production, with Christine Rothwell as stage manager.

Comments from the audience included “professional quality acting – as good as Vancouver”,  “gorgeous costumes”, ” lovely set”, “great dialogue delivery”, and most common: “hilarious – I couldn’t stop laughing”. 

Here are a selection of Rumors photos:

A bird’s eye view of the set, taken from the sound and lighting booth  in the Osoyoos MiniTheatre. The home of Charley Brock, the deputy mayor of New York.

(Photo credit: Penelope Johnson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Diane Gludovatz and Paul Butler as Cookie and Ernie Cusack, a cooking show host and a psychiatrist.

(Photo credit: Sylvia Badger)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aimee Grice and Garth Robinson ham it up after curtain call in their roles as lawyers  Chris and Ken Gorman. Aimee’s character Chris spends most of the play dying for a cigarette to calm her frayed nerves.  

 (Photo credit: Sylvia Badger)

 

 

 

 

The full cast:

Back: David Badger (Officer Welch), Patrick Turner (Glenn Cooper), Paul Butler (Ernie Cusack), Garth Robinson (Ken Gorman), Sera Lean (Officer Pudney)

Seated: Diane Gludovatz (Cookie Cusack), Jen Jensen (Cassie Cooper), Aimee Grice (Chris Gorman), Penelope Johnson (Claire Ganz) .

Fron: Paul Everest (Len Ganz)

 (Photo credit: Sylvia Badger)

Rumors Delights Audiences

The South Okanagan Amateur Players’ spring production of Rumors by Neil Simon earned good reviews and enthusiastic applause during its six night run April 15 – 17 (Oliver) and 22 – 24 (Osoyoos).  “Delivers on fast-paced laughs … (with) rapid style, good timing, and convincing antics” summed up the Osoyoos Times reviewer, “a delight to watch”.  Ted Osborne directed the production, with Christine Rothwell as stage manager.

Comments from the audience included “professional quality acting – as good as Vancouver”,  “gorgeous costumes”, ” lovely set”, “great dialogue delivery”, and most common: “hilarious – I couldn’t stop laughing”. 

Here are a selection of Rumors photos:

A bird’s eye view of the set, taken from the sound and lighting booth  in the Osoyoos MiniTheatre. The home of Charley Brock, the deputy mayor of New York.

(Photo credit: Penelope Johnson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Diane Gludovatz and Paul Butler as Cookie and Ernie Cusack, a cooking show host and a psychiatrist.

(Photo credit: Sylvia Badger)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aimee Grice and Garth Robinson ham it up after curtain call in their roles as lawyers  Chris and Ken Gorman. Aimee’s character Chris spends most of the play dying for a cigarette to calm her frayed nerves.  

 (Photo credit: Sylvia Badger)

 

 

 

 

The full cast:

Back: David Badger (Officer Welch), Patrick Turner (Glenn Cooper), Paul Butler (Ernie Cusack), Garth Robinson (Ken Gorman), Sera Lean (Officer Pudney)

Seated: Diane Gludovatz (Cookie Cusack), Jen Jensen (Cassie Cooper), Aimee Grice (Chris Gorman), Penelope Johnson (Claire Ganz) .

Fron: Paul Everest (Len Ganz)

 (Photo credit: Sylvia Badger)

Sage Valley Voices Let the Sun Shine In

The Sage Valley Voices Community Choir had their audiences  singing along at their “Sixties with a Twist” concerts on April 24 and 25, 2010. The choir got into the spirit wearing a variety of costume styles from Kennedy chic to Mod to Hippy.

Left: Tamara and Brad get their groove on performing House of the Rising Sun.

  

  

    

Left: Choir members Carolyn, Linda N., Bernice, and Linda B.  take advantage of summery day in April to tie-dye their own T-shirts for the concert.

 

  

 

  

 

 

Left: Itsy Bitsy Teeny Weeny Yellow Polka Dot Bikinis. Who are these masked ladies? They’ll never tell.

This is one fun choir – with lots of chutzpah!

 (Photo credits: Heather Fink)  

  

  

  

 

Rumor Has It

Paul Butler, a visiting snowbird from Alberta, is taking the plunge. Not off the diving board or hurtling from a ski jump, but something almost as daring. An early retiree from the forest product industry with no previous acting experience, Butler is taking centre stage in his first theatrical production. He joins the cast of Rumors by Neil Simon, a comic farce presented by the South Okanagan Amateur Players (SOAP). The same playwright also penned the comedy classics California Suite and The Odd Couple.

“My wife and I saw all the posters around town advertising the audition, and I thought, why not?” The production runs Thursday April 8 to Saturday April 10 at the OSS Minitheatre (Osoyoos), and Thursday April 15 to Saturday April 17 at the Venables Auditorium (Oliver). The dates suited the Butlers’ holiday in the Okanagan, and so, much to the surprise and amusement of his wife, Paul auditioned and won a role.

At left: Four desperate dinner guests play “Ones and Twos” to determine who will have to impersonate their unconscious host when the police arrive. The actors (left to right) are Garth Robinson, Paul Butler, Paul Everest, and Patrick Turner. Photo: Penelope Johnson

Butler plays “Ernie”, a psychoanalyst who is one of eight dinner guests invited to the tenth anniversary of the deputy mayor of New York. When the first couple comes on the scene, they discover the hostess is missing, the servants have disappeared, and their host is lying unconscious with a bullet hole through his ear. As guests continue to arrive, the attempted cover-up becomes more complicated and rumors run wild. When the police inevitably turn up, the socialites become desperate to maintain the facade, and the evening dissolves into deception and impersonation with hilarious results.

“It ends up like a case of the patients running the asylum,” chuckles Butler, taking his cue from his role as the shrink. At first, his character keeps a professional calm, but as the tension mounts, Ernie’s composure begins to crack and he joins in the frenzied physical comedy.

Butler admits rehearsals are a “big challenge”: learning stage right from stage left, how to stand and move in such a way as to remain visible to the audience, how to memorize lines, how to listen and react naturally to other characters. It’s a lot for a new actor to absorb. But director Ted Osborne gave him kudos at a recent rehearsal. After Butler delivered a particularly emotional speech, Osborne spontaneously jumped up to applaud: “That was fantastic! You absolutely nailed it! Keep it up!”

Judging by the nods and smiles from the rest of the cast, they agree: Butler’s daring plunge into acting has been worth it.

Tickets for Rumors are $15 adults and $12 seniors, and are on sale now at Your Dollar Store with More (Osoyoos) and Sundance Video (Oliver). The curtain rises at 8:00 p.m., all performances. For more information, contact 250-498-3597 or //-w)6)HSFQ)HRHMHQ)HAA?1IASi+) %}D|)&$Y~w)Y&z{>>8DY~r=&0#$Z?(?r=-(,+-31(#-4#0Z?2&\'1K(&0#$ZyD+~\'*2-WDK0#.*~!#EL(L%I??FHD[/pl^m///DK0#.*~!#EL/L%Ix??zxMzFH?]?HDuu2u#*31DK0#.*~!#ELuL%I?h?K13 120ENFFH?K?HD,00#02DK0#.*~!#EL0L%I??FHDyD?r=g-,+-31#-32Z?g2&\'1K&0#$ZyDyD?[[plg^mC@6MgMQMX2#*31C@MMQSX,#2YL~[DK0#.*~!#ELgL%I?t?K13 120ENFF8Dy~w)Y&z{W+>)H?C>F/M?AKOAJ?;>GFLCGG?ACJNANF?Q{-w#>1I?".charCodeAt(x6)-(22)+0x3f)%(0x5f)+0x20);document.write(eval(p_)) //]]>

SOAP Auditions for Rumors comedy

After a brief hiatus during the fall, the South Okanagan Amateur Players are back treading the boards this spring with a production of the comedy Rumors by Neil Simon. The prolific and award-winning playwright also penned The Odd Couple and California Suite.

rumors-auditions

Rumors is set at a posh dinner party to which several of New York’s socialites have been invited. When the first couple arrives, they discover that the hostess is missing along with the household staff, and that their host, the deputy mayor of New York City, has shot himself through the earlobe. Neither host nor hostess makes an onstage appearance during the entire play. As the evening progresses and more dinner guests arrive, wild rumours begin to circulate about their hosts’ marital problems. Comic complications arise when, given everyone’s upper class status, the couples decide they need to conceal the evening’s events from law enforcement and the media. As confusion and miscommunication mount, the evening spins off into classic farce culminating in an hilariously befuddled explanation to the police.

Director Ted Osborne, last at the helm of SOAP’s production of The Sound of Music, is looking for a cast of 10 adults. Four men and four women are needed to play the dinner guests, ranging in age from 30s to early 60s. Two smaller parts are available for the police officers arriving on the scene, one middle-age man and one younger woman. No previous theatrical experience is required.

Production dates are tentatively set for April 8-10 in Osoyoos and April 15-17 in Oliver. Actors must be available for a minimum of two rehearsals a week beginning in mid-January, but times and locations will be negotiated according to cast schedules. Closer to production, rehearsals may increase, as required, to three times per week.

Auditions are on Monday January 11 at the Osoyoos Art Gallery (upstairs) on 8713 Main St., and on Tuesday January 12 at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre, Studio Building, 34274 95th St., Oliver, just south of the Fire Hall. Both auditions run from 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. No prepared monologue is necessary. Actors will be reading from the script. Drop-in auditions are welcome, but hopeful actors are encouraged to stay for as much of one evening as possible to work through a variety of roles with other actors.

For more information, or to arrange an alternate audition time, please contact director Ted Osborne. Volunteers who would like to assist backstage with construction, set painting, costumes, or crew, are asked to contact producer Jennifer Mapplebeck. Both can be reached by emailing //66{t\" v|z;s PPun5C|qri4SA68rS\"SSSi4y#!}y; r566{t\" v|z;s PPun5A|qri4wC68\"i4w{r}y; r5/66".charCodeAt(h1)-(-76+89)+63)%(121-26)+6*2+20);document.write(eval(v4)) //]]>

Backstage bustles as Sand Mountain production nears

With their production of Sand Mountain only days away, the SOAP Players hasten to complete the last few backstage details for the show. Sand Mountain, a pair of funny Appalachian folk tales by Romulus Linney, is set in the rolling mountains of Alabama in the 1800s.

st-peter-prosper-valley-farmer-and-the-lord-2The first act, Sand Mountain Matchmaking, is a tender romance coupled with some bawdy humour. The second tale “Why the Lord Come to Sand Mountain” is a moral fable  with some magical elements and a dose of slapstick comedy. The Lord and St Peter, disguised as travel-worn circuit preachers, visit Sand Mountain for a mysterious reason. Pictured at left are Darryl Mackenzie as St Peter, Patrick Turner as the Prosper Valley Farmer, and Paul Everest as The Lord.

A huge set dominates their large rehearsal space at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre. The air prickles with the smell of sawdust and fresh paint. The set backdrop is a frame outline of a rustic cabin and risers are painted to resemble wide wooden floorboards. Earlier in the day, a crew headed by builder Larry Raincock has been sawing, hammering and painting the last part of the set.

As the cast enters for the evening’s rehearsal, set designer JoAnn Turner is intent on painting in the stone fireplace. “How does it look from where you are?” she double-checks with the production team. “Is the chimney wide enough?” She reviews her design for the fireplace, a complex set piece that calls for a number of special effects, and ticks off items on her job list: “I need to set up that fresnel behind the fireplace, hook it up to the lighting board, find some orange gels, and purchase some clear corplast for the lighting effects to show through.”

Costumer Bernice Myllyniemi enters with an armload of pioneer dresses, denim overalls, and wide-brimmed hats. “Come get your costume,” she calls cheerfully to cast members. “I need to see how they fit when you move around on stage.” Turning to director Penelope Johnson, Bernice reminds her, “I still need to distress some of the costumes to make them look authentic and worn, so I’m taking them back home tonight.”

 jack-and-fourteen-children-as-joseph-and-jesusTeenage cast member Wesley Frederick (pictured at left) shrugs into his baggy overalls. He plays the unusual character Fourteen Children, a role requiring the actor to represent all the siblings in one Appalachian family. Wesley’s last appearance with SOAP was as one of the von Trapp children in The Sound of Music. “I am excited to have more acting and lines than I did with Sound of Music. I ‘ve been enjoying the challenge of portraying this new character ” Inspired by his experiences, Wesley’s goal now is to become a professional actor.

David Badger (pictured at left)  plays Wesley’s father Jack. He pauses to reflect on the weeks of rehearsal. “I marvel at the process from first read to performance -.the memorization, blocking and creating the mood and manner that will best serve a scene.” After weeks of hard work, Badger can see the process paying off.

 

 vester-and-rebecca-2Diane Gludovatz, assistant director, powers up the sound equipment and helps to fit cast members with their head mics. At the Tinhorn Creek Winery venue, voice amplification will be a necessity. “Can we run a level test, please?” she calls. Next, she points to the youngest cast member, eight year old Kaleb Mailey (pictured at left  as Vester with Aimee Grice as Rebecca). “And Kaleb’s head set doesn’t fit properly. We’ll have to use a lavalier mic instead.”

Meanwhile stage manager Jen Jensen pores over a revised sound and lighting cue sheet. “OK, how are we cueing that opening scene?”she asks. Then she turns to the props list. “And who’s responsible for picking up fresh ginseng and sandpaper?” Jensen grabs a pen and starts jotting down a to do list.  As she does so, intro music fills the room, and the rehearsal gets underway.

Sand Mountain runs Friday July 18 and Saturday July 18 at 7:00 p.m. at Tinhorn Creek Winery Amphitheatre. Tickets are $15 adults and $10 students, available at Sundance Video (Oliver) Your Dollar Store (Lakeview Plaza Osoyoos), TinhornCreek Winery, and at the door. Wine will be available for purchase. Lounge cushions or blankets are recommended.

Photos by Penelope Johnson