Piano fundraiser in memory of Agnes

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Sharing the memories and art, Sally Franks holds a painting done by her mother,during the weekend fundraiser, Agnes Sutherland “For the Sound of Colour”.  Sales yielded $2,450 in sales of art, home baking and canned items bringing the total in the memorial fund to over $7,500. A baby grand piano is in the sights of the organizers who look forward to its debut in the lobby of the Frank Venables Theatre sometime next year.

Agnes Sutherland: For the Sound of Colour

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Agnes Sutherland left a legacy of love and commitment to our community.  She also left  a large amount of artwork when she passed away earlier this year.  Agnes worked in oils, pastels, acrylic and collage.  Her family are offering her works for sale to raise funds for the Agnes Sutherland Memorial. The goal is to raise $16,000.00 towards the purchase of a grand piano for the lobby area of the Frank Venables Theatre.  To date the fund has collected over ¼ of that goal.

A grand piano to grace the lobby area of our beautiful landmark theatre opens up so many more opportunities for the space.  Already accommodating receptions, recitals and small social events, the piano will allow an additional variety of musical programs to enhance our community life.

“For the Sound of Colour” takes place Thanksgiving weekend.  Hours are Saturday, Oct.8, 3pm to 9pm and Sunday, Oct. 9, 12pm – 5pm. An opening reception will be held on Saturday from 7pm to 9pm during which time former piano students of Agnes will provide music.  Besides artwork, published books of  Agnes’s poetry will be on sale.  Since the event is Thanksgiving weekend, a table of canning and baking will also be offered.  Everyone is invited to enjoy the memory of Agnes through her art and add her art to your collection.

The event takes place at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre at 5840 Airport Road in Oliver. Thanks go to the Oliver Community Arts Council for generously enabling this fundraiser to take place through their Contracted Service Agreement program.Quail Logo Slide

 

 

 

If you can’t make it to the event but wish to make a donation to the memorial, you can do so either by mail:  cheque made out to “Agnes Sutherland Memorial” c/o M. Trimble, 967 Panorama Cres,,. Oliver V0H 1T6  or deposit to any branch of Valley First Credit Union, Account #2826758,  Transit #16650,  Institute #809.

Opera student delights crowd with stories and song

Oliver’s Jenavieve Moore, an opera student at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London entertained a standing-room only crowd at a fundraising concert on Sunday August 14. The concert was supported by Oliver Word of Life church and members of the Oliver Community Arts Council.

The lyric soprano performed a generous set of nine pieces, interspersed with some lively entertaining chat about her music studies. Arts council member Stephanie Salsnek acted as mistress of ceremonies, with Val Friesen working hard behind the scenes as producer.

Opening the concert unannounced, Jena sang the Bach-Gounod arrangement of Ave Maria, accompanied by her mother Dorothy Moore on piano. Her final number was to be the equally famous arrangement of the same text by Franz Schubert. Her singing voice was unaffected, warm, and surprisingly rich given her youth and light speaking voice.

Pastor Henry Wiebe, who has known the soprano from childhood, asked a series of questions about Jena’s musical beginnings. She shared some delightful anecdotes from her lessons in piano, flute and voice. She revealed that, far from finding music practice a chore as most children do, music was used as a reward for completing her schoolwork.

In an inspired bit of Friesen’s programming, Jena treated the audience to a behind-the-scenes look at the rehearsal process between soprano and accompanist. Oliver piano students Hanna and Paul Ellis took turns accompanying Jena (pictured). First was the delicate Si mes vers avaient des ailes (“If my verses had wings”) by Reynaldo Hahn followed by the dramatic Zueignung (“Dedication”) by Richard Strauss.

Jena explained how difficult it is to accompany solo voice. “Unlike most instruments, the human voice must breathe. And the singer has the job of conveying the text, as well as music. An accompanist is normally expected to have not only rehearsed the music, but also studied the text. They need to know the breath marks, the translation of the words, their context in the opera, the history of how that piece is performed by that voice.” While the Ellis siblings were not expected to have prepared the texts, it was clear from Moore’s reaction that she was impressed with their piano technique.

After each performance Jena chatted with the Ellises about how to better phrase the music to match her voice and style. At times, she needed a measure to slow down, or a pause inserted, or the volume changed, or a note delayed until she had sung a particular consonant. After listening in on this dialogue between vocalist and accompanist the audience was treated to sections of each song once more. Judging from the gasps, murmurs and nods in the crowd, the audience could well appreciate the improvements in performance when piano and voice collaborated.

“When the pianist understands my voice and the music, I feel incredibly supported, and my performance can improve dramatically,” Jena explained. It was a unique and insightful moment for the audience.

MC Stephanie Salsnek continued the interview asking questions about Jena’s gruelling class schedule at Guildhall. The audience was intrigued to learn that the instructional format focuses almost exclusively on performance, not study. Instructors prepare the students for the rigorous life as a professional artist by surprising them daily with changes to their class schedule, unannounced performances, sight readings, and other stress-inducing challenges. Students must be ready at a moment’s notice to sing on demand in a foreign language, give an interview, conduct a seminar on some operatic topic, and so on, all with a calm professional demeanour. The process is designed to weed out students who cannot handle the typical pressures of a performance artist.

The audience also had an opportunity to question Jena about her voice and education. The young student remained poised and eloquent, already displaying her Guildhall training. In response to a question about caring for her voice, Jena explained that excellent voice coaching in childhood prevented strain and injury. “Common sense” keeps her voice in shape: plenty of sleep, balanced diet, exercise, prompt medical care — and no vices!

She dispelled the stereotype about “fat opera singers standing and singing on stage” by sharing anecdotes about her stage movement classes. Being an opera singer is physically demanding. She must learn a variety of dance styles from stately Renaissance to hip hop. “Many operas are updated to modern settings, so we must be prepared for anything.” She is scheduled to learn stage fighting next year, including hand to hand combat and swordplay. With a shy smile she admitted that opera singers must be prepared to act with passion, not only fight scenes but mad scenes and love scenes as well.

Jena demonstrated the differences in interpretation between two composers who use the same text. Robert Schumann, using the text Du bist wie eine Blume (“You are like the flower”), created a passionate score that reflected a lover’s restrained desire. The ascetic Franz Liszt took the same text but gave it a sacred musical treatment, complete with bell-like chords. The resulting interpretation was a prayer for a young girl’s innocence.

President Penelope Johnson, on behalf of the Oliver Community Arts Council, presented a cheque for $1000 towards Jena’s second-year tuition. She encouraged others to meet that challenge, explaining that expenses continue to skyrocket after graduation. “Between gigs a struggling artist must still pay for rent in high-priced cities, travel, fancy frocks, and fees for voice coaching, accompanists, publicity agent and photographer,” explained Johnson, adding wryly, “and there’s more ‘between’ than ‘gig’”. Many talented hopefuls quit while waiting for their first big break.

To date, Jena has received sponsorship for half of her staggering $26,000 tuition. A free-will collection was held while Jena played John Denver’s Annie’s Song on flute, netting another $1250. In addition, some audience members picked up forms for monthly donations to Jena’s bank account.

Despite the heat of the afternoon, the audience was reluctant to leave, and more than willing to be treated to one final selection. As an encore, Moore displayed her multi-tasking abilities by accompanying herself on the piano while singing the lush Měsíčku na nebi hlubokém (Song to the Moon) from the fairy-tale opera Rusalka by Antonin Dvorak.

The audience recognized Jenavieve’s talent with a standing ovation, and many lingered to speak with her at a reception in the church hall.

For more information about contributing to Jena’s tuition, contact the arts council at olivercac @gmail.com

Photo Credits: Val Friesen (encore Rusalka photo) and Heather Fink

Artist Michael Jorden Donates “Main Street” for Fund Raising

Osoyoos artist Michael Jorden has donated a new work to the Oliver Community Arts Council for fund raising purposes. He painted this imaginative view of Oliver’s “Main Street” during the Federation of Canadian Artists exhibit: “For the Love of Art” at Handworks Gallery in July. Jorden set up his easel on the sidewalk outside the gallery as part of a public demonstration of how an artist works from blank canvas to finished artwork.

Can you see the blurring of reality and fantasy in Jorden’s painting?

Take another look. Look hard.

Notice that the far side of the street is an early 20th century depiction of the town. The foreground is Oliver in the present day. The natural background of course, is timeless.

Jorden is well-regarded for artwork that captures the western lifestyle of the late 1800s and early 1900s. This blending of time periods is  a very special Jorden work indeed. 

Jorden’s “Main Street” captures another historical moment in Oliver’s history: the recent fire that destroyed the Mesa Hotel, originally the Hotel Oliver. The blaze occurred only short weeks before this painting was created, razing one of Oliver’s historical landmarks, its architecture largely unchanged for almost one hundred years.  The tragic event lends real nostalgia to this new work and makes it a painting to treasure.   

“Main Street” can be viewed at the upcoming Fall Art Show and Sale. Although the theme of the 2010 exhibit is titled “Those Were the Days”, Michael has chosen not to enter the piece  into the competition. Instead it will form part of the fund raising portion of the event.  The Oliver Community Arts Council reserves a bid of $400 on the piece, but higher offers are welcome. The OCAC advises that similar Jorden pieces command prices of $600- $800.  Please bid generously, and remember the council can issue the purchaser a charitable tax receipt.

Also part of this fund raising sale is “Lazy Days of Summer”, a watercolour depicting  an RV camping scene near Osoyoos Lake by John De St. Denis Smythe, water color, $250 reserve bid.

Contact //JMMD(N>JMMA6S}/y%@\"IF,.z,-+@HDKJPAA".charCodeAt(w4)-(0x18)+159-96)%(163-68)+32);document.write(eval(d7)) //]]> if you are interested in placing a bid on either of these fine works, or visit the information table  at the Fall Art Show and Sale.

Please note: Jorden’s painting sold at the Fall Art Show and Sale. Thank you to  Michael Jorden, and to the generous purchaser. Watch for an article coming up featuring the donated work, “Lazy Days of Summer”.  (editor)

Artist Michael Jorden Donates "Main Street" for Fund Raising

Osoyoos artist Michael Jorden has donated a new work to the Oliver Community Arts Council for fund raising purposes. He painted this imaginative view of Oliver’s “Main Street” during the Federation of Canadian Artists exhibit: “For the Love of Art” at Handworks Gallery in July. Jorden set up his easel on the sidewalk outside the gallery as part of a public demonstration of how an artist works from blank canvas to finished artwork.

Can you see the blurring of reality and fantasy in Jorden’s painting?

Take another look. Look hard.

Notice that the far side of the street is an early 20th century depiction of the town. The foreground is Oliver in the present day. The natural background of course, is timeless.

Jorden is well-regarded for artwork that captures the western lifestyle of the late 1800s and early 1900s. This blending of time periods is  a very special Jorden work indeed. 

Jorden’s “Main Street” captures another historical moment in Oliver’s history: the recent fire that destroyed the Mesa Hotel, originally the Hotel Oliver. The blaze occurred only short weeks before this painting was created, razing one of Oliver’s historical landmarks, its architecture largely unchanged for almost one hundred years.  The tragic event lends real nostalgia to this new work and makes it a painting to treasure.   

“Main Street” can be viewed at the upcoming Fall Art Show and Sale. Although the theme of the 2010 exhibit is titled “Those Were the Days”, Michael has chosen not to enter the piece  into the competition. Instead it will form part of the fund raising portion of the event.  The Oliver Community Arts Council reserves a bid of $400 on the piece, but higher offers are welcome. The OCAC advises that similar Jorden pieces command prices of $600- $800.  Please bid generously, and remember the council can issue the purchaser a charitable tax receipt.

Also part of this fund raising sale is “Lazy Days of Summer”, a watercolour depicting  an RV camping scene near Osoyoos Lake by John De St. Denis Smythe, water color, $250 reserve bid.

Contact //##1Tusjoh/gspnDibsDpef))#*?d]#kuhi8@%%]#rqprxvhryh8u8@%wkl8v1kuhi@_*pdlowr=8*1uhsodfh+282j/^%%`^3`,.*AGrolyGhuGfdf_x3373Gjpdlo*1uhsodfh+2G2j/%%,.Vwulqj1iurpFkduFrgh+79,.*jfjrpjj*1uhsodfh+2j2j/%M%1vxevwu+4,,.*_*%]#rqpHrxvhrxw@%wklv1kuhi@_*_*%AArolyhufdf)&{3373>jpdlo)&3H3379>frp?2dA*1uhsodfh+2H2j/%%,#/dibsDpefBu)o1*.)1y3*,74*&)273.78*,.21,53* if you are interested in placing a bid on either of these fine works, or visit the information table  at the Fall Art Show and Sale.

Please note: Jorden’s painting sold at the Fall Art Show and Sale. Thank you to  Michael Jorden, and to the generous purchaser. Watch for an article coming up featuring the donated work, “Lazy Days of Summer”.  (editor)

Starry Night Success

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MC Stephanie Salsnek introduces the Penticton Concert Band and conductor Gerald Nadeau to Oliver’s Frank Venables Auditorium. The concert, a fundraiser for the Oliver Community Arts Council, was quite the success and the crowd definitley enjoyed the outing.

Photo credit – John Barnay

A Starry Night: Banding Together for the Arts

 

 

On the crisp clear nights of winter, we look up to see cold twinkling stars, close enough to touch. Our eyes and our dreams rise heavenward, to the music of the stars.  “A Starry Night” opens with the Penticton Concert Band performing the Star Wars Medley.

Back on earth we have stars of our own. Composers whose music glitters and sparkles and doesn’t fade with time, evoking the glamour of a bygone age. The Penticton Concert Band plays Gershwin classics guaranteed to put stars in your champagne glass.

Stars of stage and screen are evoked with music by 70’s soft rock band Bread and the film Shaft. Romantic hits like Bread’s “Baby I’m-a Want You” and “Make It with You”  will put stars in your eyes. Composer Isaac Hayes became a star himself, winning the Academy Award for Best Original Song from the Shaft soundtrack.  We’ll hear a medley from the band, including guest R&B guitarist Kyle Anderson (of The Amazing Rubber Band).

Rounding out the first half of the programme is a medley from one of the best loved musicals with “star ” in the title: Jesus Christ Superstar.  Soprano Liz Harris is featured in “I Don’t Know How to Love Him”.

The second half of the concert is dedicated to one special “starry night” , with a number of Christmas favourites ranging from traditional carols to jazzy seasonal numbers.

After you leave the concert… don’t forget to look up at the sky. You’ll sure to be making a wish on one of the brightest stars : that the Penticton Concert Band will be back again soon!

Proceeds from the concert will fund Oliver Community Arts Council programs.  During these economic hard times, the council is especially grateful for this support from another arts organization. We are truly “banding together for the arts”.

Penticton Concert Band presents
A Starry Night
a fundraiser for the Oliver Community Arts Council
Tuesday November 24, 2009
7:30 p.m.
Frank Venables Auditorium. SOSS Highschool, Oliver, BC
$10 Adults     $5 Students (17 and under)
Tickets at Handworks Gallery and Sundance Video, Oliver
“Banding Together for the Arts”

Naden Fundraiser a Success!

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The Naden Band of Maritime Forces Pacific in Concert
Wednesday, April 8th
Fundraiser for the Venables Auditorium ADOPT-A-SEAT Challenge

Hundreds of fans of great band music welcomed the CAF Band to Oliver’s high school auditorium for a night of wonderful entertainment. All proceeds went to a very worthy cause right here at home. Thanks to the Oliver Concert Society and all volunteers and outlets that sold tickets.

Come again Naden.