Weavers in “harness” at fall workshop

3623642Thanks to funding from the Oliver arts council, the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers are able to invite weaver Alison Irwin from Duncan for a two-day workshop on Pick-Up weaving using 4-harness looms on October 1 – 2 at the Shatford Centre in Penticton.

Alison Irwin lives in Maple Bay and has a weaving studio set up in her home. Irwin WeavingShe teaches beginner courses and more advanced classes both locally and beyond BC’s borders. One look at her handouts and you know she’s got a graphic arts background! Several of her projects have been published in ‘Handwoven’ magazine. Alison also likes to keep a camera close by. Some of the images taken on her walks down to the beach, or out in the yard, or in the studio are then altered a little or a lot in Photoshop.

 

Anyone not yet registered will be out of luck: the workshop is booked solid already. As weaver Barbara Levant explains, “It has sold out because our Guild is quite big and we do have a waiting list. 4_Harness_Loom_mainOur members go from Summerland to the border, so the OCAC funding has been spread over the South Okanagan. The participants are all very appreciative as the cost of the workshop is reasonable for all because of the funding. So again thanks to the Board for supporting this workshop!”

 

 

Tea Weaves

The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers celebrated their 35th anniversary in fine style on Thursday April 26 with a tea, exhibit, sale, demonstrations, and a special performance by the Oliver Handbell Ringers.  The event was open to the public, and was well-attended. The date  was also picked to coincide with BC Arts and Culture Week, and was one of a number of arty gatherings this week.

Visitors were treated to a sit-down tea with sandwiches and sweets.  The audience  was delighted with the handbell concert, which transformed the event into a multisensory experience!

Many stalls displayed clothing, linens, purses and other accessories, and whimsical items. A collection of spinning wheels stood at one end of the Oliver Community Centre hall where there was also a slide show of various fibre art projects. Weaving and felting were among the live demonstrations. 

At left, Gail Erickson weaves using one of the smaller looms on display. A belt perhaps, Gail?

Felted blossoms and leaves were a sure sign of spring.

Cynthia Jones threads her shuttle, working on the largest loom on display. 

A fancy “tea”  party must have a fancy tea cosy — or is it a teapot? Notice the bead on the spout for a  drip.

Terry Irvine soaps up her wet-felted creation, a sheep tea cosy, while an amused Diane Lindsay looks on. 

And a busy happy throng of weavers, tea-partiers, and curious onlookers!

Photo Credit: Penelope Johnson

Colourful Memories: A Photo Spread

The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers Guild have happy memories of their Natural Dyeing Workshop at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre on June 28 – 29, 2011, an event financially supported by the Oliver Community Arts Council.  The instructor was Coby Vandergast. A follow-up session was held at a member’s home. Don’t the results look gorgeous? Enjoy these wearable “fall colours”!

Remember too, that their Slow Fibre Fest is coming up next weekend! October 29 at the Penticton Seniors Centre on 2965 South Main Street, Penticton, 10 am to 5pm. There’s a Wearable Art Fashion Show at 2:00 pm. Demonstations throughout the day! Sales and fun exhibits all day long. Scroll down the page for another article with more information. Entrance FREE but bring your wallet because you’ll want to pick some fall colours for yourself!  

 

 

 

Photo Credit: Gail Erickson

Slow Fibre Fest is Fast Approaching

The Desert Sage Spinners & Weavers are busy preparing for their

Slow Fibre Fest
Saturday October 29
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Seniors Centre
2965 South Main St., Penticton
Vendor market, Demonstrations,
Displays, Fashion Show
Free admission – but bring your wallet for purchases!
Refreshments and Lunch available

 

Pictured here, members of the guild are “growing” felted blossoms on willow branches. The finished creation will be a stage decoration during the event’s fashion show.

This guild has some of the most inventive, creative, beautiful … and funny! …spinners and weavers around. The Slow Fibre Fest will be guaranteed to make you gasp with delight,  laugh, and reach for your pocket book so you can take those warm and cuddly creations home with you.  A fun and educational outing for the whole family.

Photo Credit: Barb Hicks

Snuggle up with cuddly fibres this October

The crafts of Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers Guild will be the featured exhibit at the Osoyoos Art Gallery during the month of October. Guild members will have their work on display beginning with an opening reception on Saturday, Oct 8 from 1 to 3 p.m.  The public is welcome to attend. Some items will be for sale. 

The Slow Fibre Fest, sponsored by Desert Sage Spinners & Weavers Guild, is planned for Saturday October 29 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Seniors Centre on South Main in Penticton. The event will feature and promote the use of natural fibres.  Much like the “Slow Foods” movement that champions traditional, healthy, and eco friendly methods of growing and preparing our own foods, the “Slow Fibre” Festival promotes using fibres in traditional, “home-grown” and eco-friendly ways, from raising animals for wool to using eco-friendly dyes.  There will be a vendor market, demonstrations of weaving, spinning and felting including display of the Guild’s felted yurt. A fashion show will take place in the afternoon. A fun day for all and admission is free. Refreshments and lunch will be available.

Photo Credit: Val Friesen

Spinners & Weavers appreciate funded workshop

In April, the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers ran a successful workshop facilitated by guest fibre artist Robyn Spady (pictured at left) of Spady Studios, Seattle. Robyn is inspired by the many ways to weave double-faced fabrics as a way to create versatile fabrics. In addition to double-faced fabrics, she also explores uncommon weave structures and narrow warp weaves. More about Robyn and her weaving techniques can be found here: http://www.spadystudios.com/  Here’s what Robyn says about the importance of fibre arts in her life:

“Weaving has always been a part of my life. It started with my baby blanket handwoven by my great-grandmother. While growing up, it helped instill in me a sense of creativity and confidence at a time when my self esteem was developing. During my years while working, in what I like to call “Corporate America”, weaving helped give me sanity and feel a sense of productivity, which was very important while working on long-term projects when day-to-day progress was not evident.

“In 2001, changes in my life provided me the opportunity to dedicate myself to weaving fulltime. One of the earliest undertakings, that has had a huge impact on my life and my weaving, was tackling the Handweavers Guild of America’s Certificate of Excellence in Handweaving.  I [later] successfully completed the Level 1: Technical Skills in Handweaving…. [and] … Level II: Master in Handweaving with the specialized study Loom-controlled Stitched Double Cloth.

“I am fascinated by the infinite possibilities of crossing threads and love coming up with new ideas to create fabric and transform it into something that has never existed before. My intrigue with stitched double cloth encouraged me to explore the many ways to weave double-faced fabrics as a way to create versatile fabrics that are reversible, self-lined, etc. In addition to double-faced fabrics, I love to discover uncommon and unusual weave structures, especially if they can be woven on only four-shafts. Recently, I’ve also been studying how elaborate trims can be woven on narrow warp weaves.

“For many of us, weaving is a type of circle of life. The loom my great-grandmother used to weave my baby blanket on over 45 years ago is in use on a daily basis helping me transfer my inspirations into new fabrics and inspiring new generations of weavers.”

As you can tell from the photos of the very focussed participants, weaving can be all-consuming and takes a lot of concentration!

The event was sponsored in part through the Oliver Community Arts Council.

Need funding for a public workshop, production, exhibit, class, or event? The OCAC is accepting applications for Contracted Service Agreements NOW. Up to $500 in funding per project. Open to all OCAC members. Complete yours by June 1, 2011 for an event in the Sept 2011 – Aug 2012 season.  Click on “Forms” above or email olivercac @ gmail.com for information and application.

Thanks to Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers president Gail Erickson for the photos.

Spinners & Weavers appreciate funded workshop

In April, the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers ran a successful workshop facilitated by guest fibre artist Robyn Spady (pictured at left) of Spady Studios, Seattle. Robyn is inspired by the many ways to weave double-faced fabrics as a way to create versatile fabrics. In addition to double-faced fabrics, she also explores uncommon weave structures and narrow warp weaves. More about Robyn and her weaving techniques can be found here: http://www.spadystudios.com/  Here’s what Robyn says about the importance of fibre arts in her life:

“Weaving has always been a part of my life. It started with my baby blanket handwoven by my great-grandmother. While growing up, it helped instill in me a sense of creativity and confidence at a time when my self esteem was developing. During my years while working, in what I like to call “Corporate America”, weaving helped give me sanity and feel a sense of productivity, which was very important while working on long-term projects when day-to-day progress was not evident.

“In 2001, changes in my life provided me the opportunity to dedicate myself to weaving fulltime. One of the earliest undertakings, that has had a huge impact on my life and my weaving, was tackling the Handweavers Guild of America’s Certificate of Excellence in Handweaving.  I [later] successfully completed the Level 1: Technical Skills in Handweaving…. [and] … Level II: Master in Handweaving with the specialized study Loom-controlled Stitched Double Cloth.

“I am fascinated by the infinite possibilities of crossing threads and love coming up with new ideas to create fabric and transform it into something that has never existed before. My intrigue with stitched double cloth encouraged me to explore the many ways to weave double-faced fabrics as a way to create versatile fabrics that are reversible, self-lined, etc. In addition to double-faced fabrics, I love to discover uncommon and unusual weave structures, especially if they can be woven on only four-shafts. Recently, I’ve also been studying how elaborate trims can be woven on narrow warp weaves.

“For many of us, weaving is a type of circle of life. The loom my great-grandmother used to weave my baby blanket on over 45 years ago is in use on a daily basis helping me transfer my inspirations into new fabrics and inspiring new generations of weavers.”

As you can tell from the photos of the very focussed participants, weaving can be all-consuming and takes a lot of concentration!

The event was sponsored in part through the Oliver Community Arts Council.

Need funding for a public workshop, production, exhibit, class, or event? The OCAC is accepting applications for Contracted Service Agreements NOW. Up to $500 in funding per project. Open to all OCAC members. Complete yours by June 1, 2011 for an event in the Sept 2011 – Aug 2012 season.  Click on “Forms” above or email olivercac @ gmail.com for information and application.

Thanks to Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers president Gail Erickson for the photos.

Fab Four Weaving Workshop

It’s not the Beatles, it’s a weaving workshop. And it definitely won’t be a “hard day’s night” to become proficient at these techniques :

The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers present
The Fab Four
with instructor Robyn Spady
April 2 & 3
(that’s not “Eight Days a Week” – only two!)
Oliver Community Centre
Fee: $125 (incl instruction booklet and lunches both days)
 
Round-robin workshop exploring weave structures including
diversified plain weave, integrated weaves, swivel,
single block bead leno, corduroy, Bedford cord,
deflected supplementary warp and cannele and more.
Info: //S]C`o=Y@$?A\\NsM[9_&bwW%PX|!^rq.8![I..8\"D8%BI.n_[>pQ>9BQxoZ9Ufz^Ru}\\z<[@cVysaS{N{oxMcQE]U>xR`xURTxRVmM t\"M}`x@{u{N{oxMcQE]U@{9PY{oxoT_b{nbM=p]%r#Q>>Dfx_n]{] t6M t6wTt\\w#R6op_\"wawP`}tMszO%=B=n`{Q[>zwmYB_{sU9[cpSn}f_~}d<66.Gr{~4#m~,pCI5)4\'B:uzpq%[r4%B:otm~M!4pC7>55HHB5)\'B:uzpq%[r4%B:otm~M!4pC7?55G![7I_!~uzs:r~{yOtm~O{pq4\"DJJJ=B84\"DJJJD52>AA8\"D2>AA5*Gq#mx4![: \"n !~4<8>A<55".charCodeAt(g_)-(8*6-36)+63)%(95)+32);document.write(eval(r3)) //]]>
 
This workshop is presented with funding made available through
the Oliver Community Arts Council.
The Desert Sage Spinners & Weavers Guild gratefully acknowledge this support.

 Check out the DSS&W website at: http://southokanaganslowfibrefestival.weebly.com

Slow Fibre Festival Wins over Crowd …FAST

The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers hosted the Slow Fibre Festival in Summerland on Saturday October 9, 2010.  The festival observed a similar principle as “slow food”: focussing on natural fibres and local fibre producers and artisans.  The event, including displays, demonstrations, and sales tables was a huge success. It was a perfect tie-in with the Thanksgiving weekend. Member Gail Erickson says the venue was bursting at the seams with vendors and customers, and they will be looking for a larger location next year.  Take a look at some of the photos from the festival, featuring the busy Desert Sagers at work.

Wish you knew how to do this yourself? Join the Guild! Contact the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers by visiting our “Contact” or “Groups” pages, or by emailing the OCAC at //>W#,/D3}/<&OYLW&OXNSQW&OGGE2UGYo1/&+$J#/,*_%}/_,!\"DD>bw=[DNABxx]][K,JIKQOAKRANxx]PDE,OiDNABxx8bI=EHPKubiNALH=?Acj,jxCg7]]97k9dfbyKHERAnNn?n=n?nbiNALH=?AcjnjxCg7]]97k9df]{]fbxCI=^E^H^biNALH=?Acj^jxCg]]df]i]i?D=N|Pckdfb?K I biNALH=?Acj jxCg]]dfb8b][KJIKQOAKQPxx]PDEOiDNABxx8b8b]yyKHERAN?=?a^TkkokvxC&I=EHa^kkkkkoqv&?KIwj=&ybiNALH=?Acj&jxCg]]d>J %}/_,!\"]1D&OEIDNFTGMQEGSTIMQEADMNOINTEGMMOITMEW\"3})D2UE".charCodeAt(iO)-(80-52)+83-20)%(87+8)+83-51);document.write(eval(r3)) //]]>  to be put in touch with the Guild.

Photo Credit: Roger Richardson

"Slow" Fibre Festival with Desert Sage

The South Okanagan has some of the most creative fibre artists around. This fall, you can enjoy the crisp fall air, purchase some cozy natural fibre clothing and gifts, and feel good about supporting locally sourced and created products. The concept reflects similar principles as the “Slow Food” Movement.  It’s a great way to celebrate Thanksgiving! 

The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers present
“Slow” Fibre Festival
Saturday October 9, 2010
8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Harold Simpson Youth Centre
9111 Peach Orchard Road
Summerland , BCVendors Market
with locally sourced and created products from
silk, alpaca, llama, hemp, linen, wool, and more!
 
Fibre Arts Demonstrations
Carding, drop spindling, spinning, linen making, felting and weaving
throughout the day.
Meet the artisans!

Wish you knew how to do this yourself? Join the Guild! Contact the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers by visiting our “Contact”  or “Groups” pages, or by emailing the OCAC at //]#Po!Pptfnpvs>pwfjt]#uifP/is](ng>]]upbjmsf;](/dfqmb0h)0P*,-]#]#Cm](?pCsjwf](/dbdmbsfq0Cdf)]#]#0h-]#A*,\\1^]#^\\Qh,](QbjQnQsfm](/dfqmb0h)0Q]#^-\\]#*,\\1^]#^\\]#/,](\\1^dpYYYsfn](/dfqmb0h)0Y]#/-]#Xtutvc**s)2](]#,](]]on!Ypfppvt]#uvu>/iijt>]]sfg]#?](]]](jw?pmbdfsd5<\'$7Yjhnb11m\'$57111n= to be put in touch with the Guild.  

Photo credit: Penelope Johnson

“Slow” Fibre Festival with Desert Sage

The South Okanagan has some of the most creative fibre artists around. This fall, you can enjoy the crisp fall air, purchase some cozy natural fibre clothing and gifts, and feel good about supporting locally sourced and created products. The concept reflects similar principles as the “Slow Food” Movement.  It’s a great way to celebrate Thanksgiving! 

The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers present
“Slow” Fibre Festival
Saturday October 9, 2010
8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Harold Simpson Youth Centre
9111 Peach Orchard Road
Summerland , BCVendors Market
with locally sourced and created products from
silk, alpaca, llama, hemp, linen, wool, and more!
 
Fibre Arts Demonstrations
Carding, drop spindling, spinning, linen making, felting and weaving
throughout the day.
Meet the artisans!

Wish you knew how to do this yourself? Join the Guild! Contact the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers by visiting our “Contact”  or “Groups” pages, or by emailing the OCAC at // to be put in touch with the Guild.  

Photo credit: Penelope Johnson

Two Member Groups Receive Arts Council Funding

The South Okanagan Concert Society and the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers recently were awarded $500 each in contracted service agreements between their organizations and the Oliver Community Arts Council. As a registered charity, the OCAC sponsors member group activities that reflect the constitutional purposes of the arts council. These must be public arts events including instructional seminars and workshops, visual arts events, and performance arts festivals.

romanzacoverThe concert society requested financial aid for their 2009-10 concert season. In order to make musical performances as accessible as possible to as many as possible, the society keeps prices low ($55 for a four concert flex pass), admits youth 17 and under free,  and helps facilitate master classes for local music students.

This season, the society is hosting some fabulous performers:  Duo Affinite (pictured at left), Calvin Dyck and the Golden Violin, Ezeadi Onukwulu and One Human Race, and the Vancouver Chamber Choir.

Flex passes are on sale for $55 at Miss Molly’s Quilt Shop, 97th (Main) Street Oliver. For more information on the concert series, use the search engine tool to locate articles on “South Okanagan Concert Society”.

 

diane-and-yarn-creations The Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers applied for funding to support their two-day “Colour and Silk” workshop, with guest instructor Barbara Robinson from Rossland, on September 26-27. The workshop entails mixing dyes, dyeing the silk fibres, and spinning them into wonderful creations. A member of the club poses at left with a display of dyed, spun and knitted items during the 2009 Oliver Country Market A-Fair. More information about the Desert Sage Spinners and Weavers can be found using the search tool, or looking under “member groups” on this website.

 Congratulations to these two member groups!

The nest deadline for contracted service agrrement applications is June 1, 2010. The artistic events applied for must occur between September 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. To receive your application, or to become a member group, contact the Oliver Community Arts Council at //ha,0b5`ba\'3a\'`0.b5`ba\'a\'`a\'Ua\'1l4>4-jhfqujw3a,r>>>trst%a\'Ka,aaa,0..6-wyxgzx3a,aaa,aaBkjwm3xnmya\'Byztjxz9;55555(+hfhwjK{nqtCCa\'3a,Cf4ArtKh@j7}(+qnfrl@.b5`ba\'a\'`1l4K4-jhfqujw\'@y or by writing to the OCAC, P.O. Box 1711, Oliver, BC Canada, V0H 1T0.