Four arts groups win contracts

Arts Jam  blank

Four local arts groups have been awarded funds from the Oliver Community Arts Council (OCAC) to supply public arts programming in the

2013-14 season.  Contracted Service Agreements permit groups to function as an “arm” of the arts council by providing public artistic events  in accordance with the OCAC mandate.

The Oliver Sagebrushers  was awarded a contract to run two weeks of “Art and Gardening” during August 2013. The lessons will be open to both children and adults.

The South Okanagan Concert Society was granted an award to assist with their upcoming concert series: Bergmann Duo (piano), Musica Intima (vocal ensemble) , Khac Chi (bamboo instrumentalists), and Ken Lavigne (tenor).

The Sage Valley Voices Community Choir received funding for their Christmas Concerts, December 7 – 8, 2013.

The Friends of the Oliver Library successfully applied for financial assistance for their 2014 Summer Reading Program for Children, specifically, to hire a professional magician to entertain participants at one event.

The maximum amount an applicant can request is $500. The award is based on adherence to the OCAC constitutional mandate, meritorious programming, and demonstrated financial need. All applicants were successful this year, receiving full funding for the amounts they each requested.

The next round of Contracted Service Agreements (CSAs) will be evaluated next year, in June 2014 for programming from Sept 2014 – August 2015. CSA applications are always available for downloading from the OCAC website (oliverartscouncil.org) on the “Forms” page. Deadline: June 1 of each year.

Landscaping continues at Quail’s Nest beginning April 22

Quail's Nest2

Contracted landscaping work will be occurring at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre at 5840 Airport Street, beginning the week of April 22 – 26.

PJR Contracting Ltd. has been hired by the Oliver Community Arts Council to remove the chain link fencing and weed trees along the northern perimeter of the property and the remaining fence along the road on the eastern side north of the “Big Blue” Building. In addition they will also be placing, levelling and packing 3/4 crush gravel on the northern end of the property. This is a continuation of the landscaping project begun in the summer of 2012.

The arts council  anticipates that this work will be completed within a maximum of two weeks, weather permitting. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause, especially in terms of noise or access. The council  anticipates the latter to be minimal, with work confined to a small area within the  property. Street parking is recommended during the day.

The fence and weed trees have been an ongoing maintenance issue at the arts centre, with the fence preventing removal of weed trees. The outcome will be a neater exterior with less weeding required  for the council and its northern neighbours.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding this project, please contact the Oliver Community Arts Council at OliverCAC @ gmail.com

Thank you to our new Operations team of Betty Lou Trimmer Bahnsen and Bob Parker for their work on this project. Look for more projects later in the year, including painting the exterior of the smaller Studio Building, and some design elements added to the doors of both buildings.

Landscaping continues at Quail's Nest beginning April 22

Quail's Nest2

Contracted landscaping work will be occurring at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre at 5840 Airport Street, beginning the week of April 22 – 26.

PJR Contracting Ltd. has been hired by the Oliver Community Arts Council to remove the chain link fencing and weed trees along the northern perimeter of the property and the remaining fence along the road on the eastern side north of the “Big Blue” Building. In addition they will also be placing, levelling and packing 3/4 crush gravel on the northern end of the property. This is a continuation of the landscaping project begun in the summer of 2012.

The arts council  anticipates that this work will be completed within a maximum of two weeks, weather permitting. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause, especially in terms of noise or access. The council  anticipates the latter to be minimal, with work confined to a small area within the  property. Street parking is recommended during the day.

The fence and weed trees have been an ongoing maintenance issue at the arts centre, with the fence preventing removal of weed trees. The outcome will be a neater exterior with less weeding required  for the council and its northern neighbours.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding this project, please contact the Oliver Community Arts Council at OliverCAC @ gmail.com

Thank you to our new Operations team of Betty Lou Trimmer Bahnsen and Bob Parker for their work on this project. Look for more projects later in the year, including painting the exterior of the smaller Studio Building, and some design elements added to the doors of both buildings.

Arts council seeks nominations for president and treasurer

Nominations committee members are busy seeking new volunteers for executive and director  positions on the  arts council Board. The Annual General Meeting is slated for Monday February 25th.

Current president Penelope Johnson will not be seeking re-election for an executive position in 2013. She has offered to stand for another year as  a director on the Board to provide a supportive resource to an incoming chair.  Johnson stated that her “exit strategy when becoming president [for her first term in 2011] was a three year limit”. She has completed two years as president, and believes the best succession plan is to serve as a director in 2013 while acting unofficially in a supportive  “past-president” role to provide continuity in leadership if requested.

Johnson stressed, in recent correspondence to the Board: ” Successive executives have worked hard to create a comprehensive Board manual that can assist new leadership. Board committees have digitally archived their material to ensure that programmes and administration can continue to run effectively despite changes in leadership. Every Board member has at their fingertips all the basic information needed to lead the Oliver Community Arts Council. Even if individuals aren’t replaceable, positions certainly are, and I trust that new leadership will step forward from the membership.”

The outgoing president has also reassured prospective incumbents that ” the role of president is primarily administrative. The president prepares for and chairs the meetings, calls exec meetings as required, and does some public face stuff like answering official communications. The additional things I have done during my terms , such as the Creative Minds newsletter and the website, occasional MCing, writing funding applications, etc can be done by anyone — they are not part of the “package” . They are my contribution as a “director” or “volunteer”. Others can pick those up if interested without being president too! And I am willing to continue most of those functions as my schedule permits.”

Treasurer Arleyene Farnworth  has also announced she is stepping down, and the hunt is on for a replacement. Previous Treasurer Jack Bennest as well as Farnworth have navigated the arts council through a number of changes in their financial accounting, including changing the fiscal year end, uploading financial information to  to CADAC (a public funding database required for all arts councils), and streamlining the bookkeeping.

At their January meeting, the Board will be discussing the feasibility of breaking the position of Treasurer into two components: a bookkeeper to perform the accounting functions of preparing monthly statements, year-to-date, and year end review and an elected “executive Treasurer” who liaises with the bookkeeper and reports at the meetings. This position would require no advanced bookkeeping skills, but some responsibility in handling money and reporting to the Board. This executive treasurer may perform some of the simpler duties such as collecting invoices,  receipts, and revenue for the bookkeeper, writing cheques, and keeping an eye on the overall budget.

The Board will be discussing the cost of hiring a bookkeeper and a cost-benefit analysis of dividing the duties in this way. “Paying that monthly expense may be worth it if it means finding a person willing to stand as Treasurer AND making their  job much more pleasant to do,” explains Johnson. “We just have to crunch the numbers. If we can find someone who can do both functions, that’s great too!”

Overall the arts council president reassures, “No arts council Board position should  be daunting. And no one should feel they are working on their own. We have more resource material now than at any previous point on the council, both in terms of written records and in terms of personnel. People are available to support newcomers to the Board and to give guidance to new executive roles, whether that’s consultation or hand holding! It’s an opportunity for someone new to put their own stamp on a position and take their role  in a new direction!”

Nominations for any Board position or information about  Board duties can be directed to the committee by contacting the arts council at or by reaching the committee chair at 250-498-3597. (Nominations will be confirmed   with the approval of the person nominated, and must be seconded at the Annual General Meeting to appear on the final slate.)  

 

Farewell to Esther – We will miss you!

Esther Brown, currently serving as the Oliver Community Arts Council’s Vice President, will be moving to Vancouver Island in August.  She is pictured enjoying the conversation at July’s Arts Jam at the Quail’s Nest.  

Esther became a business member of the arts council in 2005 as the owner of Handworks Gallery. She added a strong voice to the Board and helped the arts council develop a more professional business model to its operations and programming. From Board director, she was elected Vice President and later served three terms as the President. Her gallery soon became an unofficial arts council office  and gathering place.

When Esther “retired” the gallery in 2011, she also took a leave as executive officer, returning to a less demanding role as Board director. But she admitted to missing some of the action, and was warmly received as Vice President for 2012.  

Esther will be remembered for her inclusive attitude at the Board table, often asking “What say you all?” and pointedly inviting each director to share their views on an agenda item before a motion was called for.  Direct, firm, and fair, Esther encouraged annual reviews of programmes, inviting many guest speakers and facilitators to educate and stimulate the Board.

We will all miss her ready laugh, her fabulous coffees and wines, tales of her world travels, and her listening ear. Enjoy your extended “holiday lifestyle” on the Island, but come back often to — you know it — the heart of BC art in Oliver!

New arts council Board has several new faces

The arts council elected its new board of directors  at its Annual General Meeting on Monday February 27.

Stepping down this term are directors  Marilyn Marsel, Leann Parrent, Steve Staresina, and Roger Ulasovetz. All were thanked for their many contributions to the board and to arts council projects.

Two executive officers, Jack Bennest and Shirley Corley-Rourke, are relinquishing their duties as treasurer and secretary respectively but have been re-elected as directors. Their presence on the board will provide continuity and support for new officers.

Returning as president of the arts council is Penelope Johnson. Esther Brown steps into the role of Vice President, from her previous position as director.  Two new members, Arleyene Farnworth and Diane Gludovatz, have been elected as treasurer and secretary.

Besides Bennest and Corley-Rourke, returning directors are Sally Franks, Brian Mapplebeck, and Jennifer Mapplebeck. They are joined by newcomers to the board Bernice Myllyniemi, Bob Parker, and Betty Lou Trimmer- Bahnsen, for a total of eight directors.

The new board has its first meeting on Wednesday March 21, wheren they will receive an orientation to the arts council and each choose a program or administrative committee to oversee.

Many members in attendance at the AGM remarked on the balanced composition of the board between new and returning directors, and on the expertise brought to the board table. As one member said in her endorsement, ” This board is made up of DO-ers!”

More “do-ers” are always needed to assist with organizing arts events,  repairs and projects at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre, and administrative tasks.  Email OliverCAC @ gmail.com to find out more about pitching in!

 

AGM for Quails

All Oliver Community Arts Council members and visitors are welcome to the OCAC’s  Annual General Meeting on Monday February 27 at 9:30 a.m. at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre, 5840 Airport Road.  Renewing and new memberships are welcomed at the meeting. Coffee, tea, and refreshments provided.  The AGM is kept short, with a financial year-end report from the Treasurer, a report from the president, and the election of 2012 officers and directors.

Nominations for officers are: Penelope Johnson (President), Esther Brown (Vice President), Diane Gludovatz (Secretary) and Arleyene Farnworth (Treasurer). Ten additional nominees will stand for eight positions as directors of the Board, assuring a democratic election.  Additional nominees for all positions are welcomed.

The 2011 Board gave a vote of thanks at its recent meeting for retiring directors Marilyn Marsel, Steve Staresina, and Roger Ulasovetz, and for officers Jack Bennest, treasurer,  and secretary Shirley Corley-Rourke.  Bennest and Corley-Rourke are both running  for director positions in 2012.

Following the AGM is Arts Jam! the monthly gathering to share local arts news and views. Meet the creative crowd, and find out what’s coming up in the local arts scene!

 

Rolling into the New Year

Over the December holidays, two new rollup doors were installed on the Studio Building at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre.  The doors are insulated to improve heating efficiency, and have four windows each to improve natural light.  Larger window panels were considered by the Board, but concerns with overall weight and loss of insulating R-value resulted in the four smaller panes. However, Studio building users have already commented on the “exceptional natural light” now available for art classes.  Currently primed white, the doors will be painted in the spring along with all other exterior doors at the Quail’s Nest. Watch for a call for a volunteer painting party  – or submit your suggestions now for a colour!

The arts council wishes to thank the Vancouver Foundation for their aid in financing 50% of this project. Thanks are also due to past Vice President Darryl MacKenzie for making the application to the Vancouver Foundation last summer, and to Steve Staresina, Operations chair, for overseeing the project on the ground this December. Doors installed by OK Door Service.

Watch for further capital projects to be completed at the arts centre  in 2012.

Curious about renting the Studio Building or Big Blue for  art studio space, meetings, workshops, or giant garage sales? Contact us at olivercac @gmail.com to receive a perusal copy of the rental contract and rates.

Vancouver Foundation "rolls" out grant money for new doors

The Board of the Oliver Community Arts Council is “ready to roll”!

In October, the arts council submitted an application for capital funding to the Vancouver  Foundation. The grant request was for 50% of the cost of new steel rollup doors for the two bays of the Studio Building (pictured) at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre on 95th (Airport) Street.  The doors would be similar in style to those of  Oliver’s Firehall Bistro, complete with R-16 insulation  and a horizontal panel of double paned windows. Last week, the charity approved the arts council’s application, agreeing to pay out just over $4700 when the work is completed. Wasting no time, the arts council Board selected the bid from OK Door Penticton (the same company that installed the Firehall Bistro overhead doors) at their Board meeting this week.  

The Vancouver Foundation surprised the local organization in late summer with a personal invitation to submit an application. “It’s rare for a sponsor, foundation, or other revenue source to approach us with an offer of financial aid.  Usually we’re the ones having to chase the cash,” says OCAC president Penelope Johnson. “It was a good morale boost to the arts council to realize charitable foundations of this size are aware of us and want to support the work we do.”   

Even rarer is finding a source of revenue for capital projects. Most funders in the arts sector want to finance artistic events or operational costs, not  physical plant improvements.

The application outline four benefits to replacing the existing doors with new ones.

1. Immediate Curbside Appeal: The rollup doors are part of a larger Capital Improvements Plan to increase the Quail’s Nest property’s curbside appeal. Not only will the new doors be a visual improvement, the windows will illuminate the property and make it appear more inviting  when in use at night. All exterior doors on the property will be painted in one colour scheme once the new rollup doors are installed and when weather allows.   

2. Increased Heating Efficiency: The Studio building  currently heats with natural gas and blower. The system is very noisy, and is especially disruptive for classes and meetings.  Better overhead door  insulation will decrease the need for the blower and help keep operational costs down. 

3. Natural Lighting:  Artistic groups have been requesting improved natural lighting for years.  The window panels will make such studio work easier. The Board agreed to an upgrade to install one horizontal panel  of  aluminum glass per door (the basic quote was for four small windows per door). The upgrade will substantially improve the natural lighting.

4. Increased Usage:  Other artists and arts groups have been inquiring about usage for classes and exhibits.  The council is excited about the possibility of increasing revenue through member use, while at the same time decreasing operational costs.

The Board has already issued a letter of thanks to the Vancouver Foundation for their financial aid. The council hopes that this will be the beginning of a beneficial relationship with this charity.

Vancouver Foundation “rolls” out grant money for new doors

The Board of the Oliver Community Arts Council is “ready to roll”!

In October, the arts council submitted an application for capital funding to the Vancouver  Foundation. The grant request was for 50% of the cost of new steel rollup doors for the two bays of the Studio Building (pictured) at the Quail’s Nest Arts Centre on 95th (Airport) Street.  The doors would be similar in style to those of  Oliver’s Firehall Bistro, complete with R-16 insulation  and a horizontal panel of double paned windows. Last week, the charity approved the arts council’s application, agreeing to pay out just over $4700 when the work is completed. Wasting no time, the arts council Board selected the bid from OK Door Penticton (the same company that installed the Firehall Bistro overhead doors) at their Board meeting this week.  

The Vancouver Foundation surprised the local organization in late summer with a personal invitation to submit an application. “It’s rare for a sponsor, foundation, or other revenue source to approach us with an offer of financial aid.  Usually we’re the ones having to chase the cash,” says OCAC president Penelope Johnson. “It was a good morale boost to the arts council to realize charitable foundations of this size are aware of us and want to support the work we do.”   

Even rarer is finding a source of revenue for capital projects. Most funders in the arts sector want to finance artistic events or operational costs, not  physical plant improvements.

The application outline four benefits to replacing the existing doors with new ones.

1. Immediate Curbside Appeal: The rollup doors are part of a larger Capital Improvements Plan to increase the Quail’s Nest property’s curbside appeal. Not only will the new doors be a visual improvement, the windows will illuminate the property and make it appear more inviting  when in use at night. All exterior doors on the property will be painted in one colour scheme once the new rollup doors are installed and when weather allows.   

2. Increased Heating Efficiency: The Studio building  currently heats with natural gas and blower. The system is very noisy, and is especially disruptive for classes and meetings.  Better overhead door  insulation will decrease the need for the blower and help keep operational costs down. 

3. Natural Lighting:  Artistic groups have been requesting improved natural lighting for years.  The window panels will make such studio work easier. The Board agreed to an upgrade to install one horizontal panel  of  aluminum glass per door (the basic quote was for four small windows per door). The upgrade will substantially improve the natural lighting.

4. Increased Usage:  Other artists and arts groups have been inquiring about usage for classes and exhibits.  The council is excited about the possibility of increasing revenue through member use, while at the same time decreasing operational costs.

The Board has already issued a letter of thanks to the Vancouver Foundation for their financial aid. The council hopes that this will be the beginning of a beneficial relationship with this charity.

Learning in your Pajamas

If you are a member of the Oliver Community Arts Council or one of its member groups, and you want to improve the effectiveness of your arts and culture organization, you are invited to register for two FREE seminars courtesy of ArtsBC.  They are “webinars” – seminars on the Web. You can attend while in your own home in your PJs!

Each seminar lasts one hour, using your computer Internet connection and a toll-free phone number to link with the guest speaker and other participants across BC.  Watch a Powerpoint presentation, view the speaker, chat with other participants, ask questions. No webcam or speakers required.

One has already been held, but all three seminars are independent.  Notes and documents will be available from the first seminar, “Creating an Effective Board”. 

The remaining two “webinars” are:  

How to Move Your Organization Forward
Wednesday, October 12 (7:30 pm – 8:30 pm) OR Saturday, October 15 (10:00 am – 11:00 am)
Including these topics: Benefits to planning, Who should be involved in planning, Barriers to successful planning, and a Planning document checklist

and

Fundraising/Friendraising
Monday, October 17 or Tuesday, October 18  (7:30 pm – 8:30 pm) 
How to secure the resources you need to achieve your goals.
Topics will include: The fund raising process, Barriers to successful fund raising, Sources of support, Developing an effective fund raising plan, and Fund raising techniques that work

These seminars are recommended for Board members or directors of any of Oliver’s  arts groups. For more information and a link to register, please contact olivercac @gmail.com

Arts BC, the webinar host, provides advocacy, leadership and support to community and regional arts councils in the province of BC, and supports the central role of arts and arts practices in building community and society. Arts BC helps to finance Arts and Culture Week and hosts a spring conference every year. www.artsbc.org

Treasurer signals Time for "Change"

Arts Council treasurer Jack Bennest has given the OCAC notice of his intent not to stand for re-election in February 2012. He has assured the Board that he has enjoyed his term and hopes to remain an active member of the council but that after three years, it will simply be “time for a change”.

Bennest has implemented a number of “changes” during his tenure, all of which have streamlined the job. One of his first projects was changing the fiscal year to the January-December model. This brought the council more into standard accounting, and in accordance with the the fiscal years of funding organizations such as the BC Arts Council. Jack has also simplified the monthly financial statements, making them more accessible to other Board members.

Besides making changes, Jack likes having “change”.  He has stressed that all programs must operate as “cost-neutral”. As a result, program committees have become much more budget- conscious, seeking sponsorships and partnerships to decrease program delivery costs. Bennest states he has been “happy-happy-happy” with high cost programs operating in the black during these last two years. The picture shows Jack smiling at the Fall Art Show and Sale 2009. He will be leaving his post with the arts council in a good financial position. Ka-ching!

Jack has recommended spending “spare change”. Far from clutching purse-strings tight, Jack has encouraged judicious spending of funds held in reserve. “Use reserve funds sooner rather than later” has been his mantra, to avoid reserves being drained of their value as the cost of inflation increases.  As a result, the Board has made several careful capital improvements, and has other capital spending in the works, courtesy of Oliver Rotary funds. These include partial funding of new insulated rollup doors on the Studio Building and the bulk of the funds for landscaping.

Currently Bennest is filling out the new online CADAC forms. CADAC (Canadian Arts Data/ Données sur les arts au Canada) is the new integrated financial and statistical online database for arts organizations to record their operational and programming finances. CADAC uses a web-based application that is intended to lighten the administrative burden on arts organizations applying for operating funding to one or multiple public funders by enabling them to submit one set of financial and statistical information.

The arts council has five months to locate a new Treasurer. This is an excellent opportunity for someone interested in the position to be trained while the current Treasurer is still in place. No artistic ability is required, just an interest in finances. Contact olivercac @gmail.com or speak to any Board member to recommend a volunteer or to find out more about the position.

Photo Credit: Val Friesen (file)

Treasurer signals Time for “Change”

Arts Council treasurer Jack Bennest has given the OCAC notice of his intent not to stand for re-election in February 2012. He has assured the Board that he has enjoyed his term and hopes to remain an active member of the council but that after three years, it will simply be “time for a change”.

Bennest has implemented a number of “changes” during his tenure, all of which have streamlined the job. One of his first projects was changing the fiscal year to the January-December model. This brought the council more into standard accounting, and in accordance with the the fiscal years of funding organizations such as the BC Arts Council. Jack has also simplified the monthly financial statements, making them more accessible to other Board members.

Besides making changes, Jack likes having “change”.  He has stressed that all programs must operate as “cost-neutral”. As a result, program committees have become much more budget- conscious, seeking sponsorships and partnerships to decrease program delivery costs. Bennest states he has been “happy-happy-happy” with high cost programs operating in the black during these last two years. The picture shows Jack smiling at the Fall Art Show and Sale 2009. He will be leaving his post with the arts council in a good financial position. Ka-ching!

Jack has recommended spending “spare change”. Far from clutching purse-strings tight, Jack has encouraged judicious spending of funds held in reserve. “Use reserve funds sooner rather than later” has been his mantra, to avoid reserves being drained of their value as the cost of inflation increases.  As a result, the Board has made several careful capital improvements, and has other capital spending in the works, courtesy of Oliver Rotary funds. These include partial funding of new insulated rollup doors on the Studio Building and the bulk of the funds for landscaping.

Currently Bennest is filling out the new online CADAC forms. CADAC (Canadian Arts Data/ Données sur les arts au Canada) is the new integrated financial and statistical online database for arts organizations to record their operational and programming finances. CADAC uses a web-based application that is intended to lighten the administrative burden on arts organizations applying for operating funding to one or multiple public funders by enabling them to submit one set of financial and statistical information.

The arts council has five months to locate a new Treasurer. This is an excellent opportunity for someone interested in the position to be trained while the current Treasurer is still in place. No artistic ability is required, just an interest in finances. Contact olivercac @gmail.com or speak to any Board member to recommend a volunteer or to find out more about the position.

Photo Credit: Val Friesen (file)